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Oiled Waterstone

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Miles

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Much to my surprise, I discovered that we actually have a waterstone at work, but I could tell immediately that someone had used oil on it, an assessment quickly confirmed by one of my colleagues.
I suspect that it's ruined, but I'm willing to at least give a shot at restoring it, since it would be nice to have a waterstone in the kitchen. I'm not willing to put a lot of time and effort into it, but
I was told that it happened only once, so it's possible that the oil may not have completely penetrated the stone. Plus it's really dished. I figured I'd flatten it and try soaking it in a dilute degreaser to see if it can be brought back.
Does anyone have any experience with this sort of situation? Any pearls of wisdom?
 

bieniek

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I did.
There was combination stone 400/1000 and somebody used vegetable oil on it, and one carborundum 120/220 same same.
The first one was dished also but with use and flattening the oil marks were gone. Problem was that 400 side was uneffective and came off pretty quickly, the 1000 grit is still in the kitchen and is perfectly fine.
The grittier stone is dead. I even tried to boil it in vinegar, the only thing it helped is that it smells acidic, and you cannot take it out. Then I tried to cook it in ecolabs grill and oven cleaner, but the stone is just slick and dead. It still leaves oily marks in the water if you try to soak it
 

kalaeb

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It's not a complete loss, although I would not sharpen my knives on it. Make it flat and use it as a dedicated spatula sharpener. That is what I did when some goon used oil on one of my cheap combo stones. Works like a champ and if it gets further damaged, no big loss.
 

Jim

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Can you flatten it and flip it over?
 

goodchef1

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Hello Miles,

try boiling it in salt water and let sit over-nite. The logic being that salt is the enemy of oil, and since oil is lighter than water, it should rise to the top. Never happened to me before, but i figured if it does not work, you really have not lost a lot of time and effort :)
 

Miles

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I figure it's basically a goner. Since it's currently unusable and there's a lot of stone left, I figure it's at least worth putting a little bit of effort into it. I'm going to give it a try. I'll post my results, good or bad.
 

SpikeC

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Why not try Simple Green or an automotive degreaser? Or simmering in dishwasher detergent?
 

Lefty

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Bring a piece of broken sidewalk into work and tell the guys to sharpen on it. They will likely get the same edge no matter what they use, judging by your post...
Am I a jerk?
 

Lefty

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Sorry, I'm grumpy...I just drove 16 hours, only to have to be in at work for 7am! Haha
I would see if flattening works. If not, try spike's method.
 

Eamon Burke

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Bring a piece of broken sidewalk into work and tell the guys to sharpen on it. They will likely get the same edge no matter what they use, judging by your post...
+1

More efficient. Skip flattening, sharpen on sidewalk.
 

Abattoir

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I worked at a restaurant once and one of the amigos actually did this with one of his prep knives.....
 

Miles

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After soaking in a dilute solution of Simple Green for 72 hours followed by flattening, I'm pleased to report that the stone is actually a waterstone again. I think that the key to success was the fact that the stone was only contaminated by oil once. Had it been used multiple times, I'm not sure I'd have had much success.
 

EdipisReks

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After soaking in a dilute solution of Simple Green for 72 hours followed by flattening, I'm pleased to report that the stone is actually a waterstone again. I think that the key to success was the fact that the stone was only contaminated by oil once. Had it been used multiple times, I'm not sure I'd have had much success.
well, i'm glad you didn't take my advice, then. :)
 
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