Opinion about Wüsthof Classic Ikon

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by calostro5, Oct 1, 2019.

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  1. Oct 9, 2019 #61
    I've done a lot of demos and cooking classes, knife skills classes for a local culinary store. They carry Wusties, Shun, offered Messermeister as special order, did carry Henckels. and even had Ken Onion for a bit.

    My recollection is that the Wusties were neutral balanced throughout their lines - one of the reasons I came to prefer the slightly blade heavy Messermeister.

    Henckels does not know where it wants to be in the knife world. When I first knew of them they had the Four Star line which was quite solid (still have a couple). Henks wanted some of the cheaper market so they offered the Spanish made lines that were crap. IIRC they make a line in South America. They wanted a piece of Shun's market so they offered Miyabi - a decent housewife knife but not for me. And in cheaper offerings they produce in China.

    Henks is still bouncing around and not able to commit to where they want to be, in contrast to Wustie who offers the solid Ikon lines and a less expensive department store line - and thats all.
     
  2. Oct 9, 2019 #62

    Bobby2shots

    Bobby2shots

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    Captaincaed, you might want to talk to this guy; go to the 4:00 mark for cut-test.
     
  3. Oct 9, 2019 #63

    calostro5

    calostro5

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    I read wrong Tour previous comment. I unterstood that you had ground tje knife.
    I confused gift with grind. :confused:
     
  4. Oct 9, 2019 #64

    captaincaed

    captaincaed

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    I mean, I guess? You can make a bronze age knife capable of cutting paper once.

    I'm all ready to admit I suck at sharpening but I have no sense of what type of edge that knife had
     
  5. Oct 9, 2019 #65

    ian

    ian

    ian

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    As some consolation, when I was starting out sharpening I did a Vic for someone and found it the worst knife to sharpen that I’d tried. Somehow I haven’t done one since, though, so I have no recent experience, and many on here seem to be pleased with the steel.
     
  6. Oct 9, 2019 #66

    Bobby2shots

    Bobby2shots

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    I haven't sharpened any of my Vic's,,, mostly because some are brand new and haven't been used yet,,, but, I bought my 6" Vic Rosewood chef/utility knife 10 months ago, and it's still razor sharp. All I've ever done to it is a very light feathering with either a steel, or my Idahone ceramic rod. Less than 10 seconds, and I'm back to "like new". I use that knife every day, sometimes 4-5 times a day. It's that experience which motivated me to buy a few more Vic's. (10" Rosewood/ 8" Fibrox/ Chinese Cleaver/ Rosewood paring knife). Had I known before buying some of my Wusthofs, I would probably have gone all the way with the Vic's. While I don't find them particularly "pretty",,, they've really grown on me. I love the feel and grip of the Rosewood handles too. It may not be readily noticeable or evident when you simply look at these knives, but a LOT of thought has obviously gone into the materials, ergonomics, and ease of maintenance. I love these Vic's, and may buy a few more. I may think differently after the first sharpening, but I really can't fathom that possibility given my present experience with them.
     
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  7. Oct 9, 2019 #67

    captaincaed

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    I just remember spending ages on the 220 stone, much longer than with any other knife. Then when it came to refinement, no dice.
     
  8. Oct 9, 2019 #68

    Bobby2shots

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    I can't imagine starting out on such a coarse stone, unless the blade was damaged in some manner. If the knife needed sharpening by virtue of the fact that it had become dull, to the point where a honing was insufficient, I'd probably start out with a trailing edge sharpening on a 1K stone.(depending on the quality of the stone of course). Sharpen 'til you feel the very first sign of a burr, by sliding your thumb "ACROSS" the blade in both directions. Don't wait 'til you have a large burr completely bent over to one side. You'll easily feel the difference in sharpness on one side vs the other. Then, flip the knife and repeat on the other side until you can feel the same point of progress on the blade. Now you can remove the burr with a VERY GENTLE stropping stroke on both sides. You can either use the same stone for stropping, or go to something finer, until the thumb-test tells you the blade feels sharp in both directions as you slide your thumb across the blade. Once you're there, you can use a leather strop to clean up the edge,, and if you don't have one, even a rolled-up piece of damp newspaper will do.

    To my way of thinking, coarse stones are strictly for repairing damaged edges (nicks, etc).

    Check out Peter Nowlan's knife-sharpening videos. He's excellent as a teacher,,and a master sharpener.



    Lesson #2;

     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2019
  9. Oct 10, 2019 #69

    ian

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    Fwiw, coarse stones are fine to sharpen on even if there’s no heavy damage. I’ll totally use coarse stones (eg 300 grit) to get out microchips. I don’t got time to wail on it with a 1k for 5 min...
     
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  10. Oct 10, 2019 #70

    Bobby2shots

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    I agree,,, micro-chipped, or any other damage, and very coarse is fine. If the edge is intact but dull, then I'll go to the finest stone I can go with,,, and usually for me, that's 1k. I won't automatically start on a much coarser stone if I can avoid it. Mind you, I'm not dealing with heavily rolled-over edges.

    A friend recently gave me 15 knives to sharpen for her. She got those knives at the local Centraide store,,,, that's an outfit that sells donated goods. Those knives were in terrible condition. I've never seen edges this bad. The best ones were extremely rolled over along their entire length, and some of the blades were actually split or cracked. All, with the exception of one forged German knife, were garbage. Most of them probably cost well under $10. when new, and most of those cost her under $1. I sharpened them anyway, but I didn't even go to the stones,,, I just ran them through a Chef'sChoice 1520 electric knife sharpener and made them passably usable, and able to smoothly cut paper. On stones, it would have been a several day freebie job. The German knife was worth sharpening however, and it turned out A-1. She was thrilled with all of them however.
     
  11. Oct 10, 2019 #71

    captaincaed

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    Depends how dull the knife is. These were pretty dull.
     

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