Paul Revere Copper cookware

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rahimlee54

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Ran across a set of copper cookware from someone on facebook market. The set belonged to the guy's grandfather and he isn't sure what it is. After looking around the net I think it is paul revere copper, from an early production run. Around 50 years old, if I am correct. SS fused to copper. Anyone used these or have any info? Gonna check them out on Saturday and may grab them and give a whirl.

Thanks
Jared
 
If it's truly 50yrs old, it would be tin lined... Paul Van Achter didnt perfect the technique of bonding stainless steel to copper until 1983.

You might want to ask about their thickness. You really want it to be 2.5mm+ (2mm is acceptable)

Edit: looked it up... The Revere 'copper' pieces are copper coated clad stainless and of thinner gauge. It's not true copper cookware so ignore my above post.

Revere introduced the Paul Revere Ware line in 1967. Produced only at the Oneonta, AL plant, the copper/stainless steel material it used was made in-house using a high temperature, pressure-bonding process, not the traditional Revere electro-plating process. Designed as much (or more) for visual appeal as for function, the solid brass handles were attached with rivets welded to the bodies (producing a riveted handle with no exposed rivet heads on the cooking surface).

Initial production carried "Limited Edition Collection" stamped on the undersides of the handles while a stylized Paul Revere "signature" was later added to the underside of each piece. This combination was designated the "Paul Revere Signature Collection" when the handle imprint was removed. A special issue commemorating the American Bicentennial added "1776-1976" to the hallmark."
 
copper.png


Photo of them
 
If it's truly 50yrs old, it would be tin lined... Paul Van Achter didnt perfect the technique of bonding stainless steel to copper until 1983.

You might want to ask about their thickness. You really want it to be 2.5mm+ (2mm is acceptable)

Edit: looked it up... The Revere 'copper' pieces are copper coated clad stainless and of thinner gauge. It's not true copper cookware so ignore my above post.

Revere introduced the Paul Revere Ware line in 1967. Produced only at the Oneonta, AL plant, the copper/stainless steel material it used was made in-house using a high temperature, pressure-bonding process, not the traditional Revere electro-plating process. Designed as much (or more) for visual appeal as for function, the solid brass handles were attached with rivets welded to the bodies (producing a riveted handle with no exposed rivet heads on the cooking surface).

Initial production carried "Limited Edition Collection" stamped on the undersides of the handles while a stylized Paul Revere "signature" was later added to the underside of each piece. This combination was designated the "Paul Revere Signature Collection" when the handle imprint was removed. A special issue commemorating the American Bicentennial added "1776-1976" to the hallmark."

Thanks for the reply, may have to pass on this one then. I don't really need them but figured if it was the real deal may be nice to have.
 
You would be getting all the maintenance and care requirements (assuming you do not like the tarnished look) without getting any of the thermal benefits that copper offers. They are two layer cookware, stainless steel with a thin layer of copper, mainly for appearance.
 
Have bought pots from swap meet. Just a few bucks each, they are durable & do the job. Figured the copper clad was a benefit not just for show. It must help with conductivity some.

Have read that the pots made overseas now are poor quality.
 
Revere 3 quart pot use a lot. Bought it cheap. The double ring & serial # older pot with twice as thick copper cladding.

Revere started making stainless steel copper bottoms bakelite handles in 1930's. They sold lots of them.
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It's not just a famous name. Paul Revere actually worked copper he provided below waterline copper cladding on Old Ironsides. His children & grandchildren kept it in the family making copper pots & pans in 1800's.
 
Revere 3 quart pot use a lot. Bought it cheap. The double ring & serial # older pot with twice as thick copper cladding.

Revere started making stainless steel copper bottoms bakelite handles in 1930's. They sold lots of them.
This ↑↑↑↑↑↑↑↑↑↑↑↑ is pretty much the key to identifying the older Revere pots with thicker copper bottoms. It's pretty much all I use at home. More historical info can be found on the web.

They also made great heavy-duty mixing bowls too (no copper bottoms, as one might expect). The older ones are non-magnetic. I haven't seen any difference in the markings.
 
Yes I have several of the pre 1968 thicker copper bottom. Revere if you don't abuse it heats quickly & evenly on medium or less heat. I often cook curries & other sauces in larger glass lid pan. Store leftover in glass jars. Reheat in 3qt pot never go over medium heat with lids Revere heats up quickly.

I once had a roommate that was boiling water for noodles forgot it. I came home house was all Smokey Revere pot completely dry all water gone. I had to thow it out pot was destroyed the bakelite handle was hot but in good shape. Lucky the house didn't burn down.

Ebay still has some decent deals you have to be selective often they are cleaned some harshly. Have to check condition of stainless steel cooking surface & copper bottoms.
 
Got this large 12" skillet off ebay couple years ago when already had vintage thicker copper pots. It had no lid so cheaper price. The condition of stainless steel cooking surface was excellent considering it's age. These pots & pans heat up quickly on lower heat settings. Stainless steel skillet needs technique to prevent sticking. Preheat pan before adding oil. Get oil hot shimmer but not smoking. If protein dry first room temp. better than adding refrigerator cold. I can get crispy edge over easy fried eggs. Even Fish pat dry at room temp. I remember my mom using Revere pots in 1950's & 60's. This line of stainless thick copper sold well starting in 1939 with bakelite handles.
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