Recipe Requested Pork Belly

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valgard

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Palm sugar, fish sauce, shallots, garlic, black pepper, water.
Sautee the aromatics, add the other stuff, mix well, cook on low heat for about 40 min and up the heat if needed to make the sauce very thick. I wing the proportions but roughly 1/2 cup sugar and 1/4 cup of fish sauce for a couple pounds of pork belly.

Sometimes I wear the pork belly cubes first and use that same fat that renders to saute the aromatics.

I eat it with Jazmine rice and garnish with cilantro and green onions.
 

MarcelNL

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Hui Guo Rou or twice cooked pork, Sichuan style using Pixian Doubanjian (fermented chili with broad beans) and fermented black beans...cook the belly in one piece for approx 20 min ( I throw some star anise black pepper corns and other flavoring according to the form of the day into the water) let cool down completely. (the colder it is the easier you can cut thin slices).

a recipe is here: Twice-cooked pork, the fast version (回锅肉) though I like a different brand of Pixian Douban better, this one from the brand 'greenhouse' Greenfood Pixian Bean Sauce 454g / 鹃城牌 郫县豆瓣酱 454克 | Amazing Oriental

I usually get rid of much of the rendered fat after stir frying the pork, save it for later.

Doing a version of it now, with some Iberico pork neck in the sous vide. To be finished Friday.
 
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Delat

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For really crispy skin, leave the pork belly skin-side up uncovered in the fridge for a day or two. Dry skin crisps up much better.
While you’re doing that, it also helps to salt the skin and periodically dry it with a paper towel as you see moisture coming to the surface. Great-looking recipes posted above and I look forward to trying them!

I love pork belly and make it a few different ways.

You can just do the classic dry roast in the oven with salt, pepper, garlic/onion powder. Basically a texas brisket rub. Tons of recipes online for that style and super simple. I think I do something like an hour at 350, then drop to 300 for 3 hours, then finish under the broiler to crisp the skin. Some recipes reverse that, starting off with crisping the skin instead.

If you like gravy/sauce, I love this recipe: Emeril's New Orleans' Asian-Style Braised Pork Belly

For the above, I also like to take some leftovers and wok them up with vinegar, brown sugar, extra pepper, and smoked sesame oil. It caramelizes and crisps up the meat and gives it a different character from the soft braise.

Just recently I made pork belly burnt ends, but in the oven instead of the smoker. I glazed them at the end with a mixture of maple syrup, scotch bonnet pepper sauce, vinegar, and salt. Lots of recipes out there as well for this, I just grabbed a random one to give me rough cooking time & temp. I think I did something like 350 for an hour then 275 for 3 more hours. Reminds me I should post a pic over in the what’s cooking thread.
 

daveb

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Pictures are gone but I'm not sure I've had better pork belly than the one described here.

 

ian

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Do the twice cooked pork. Nothing better.
 

MarcelNL

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Chasu sounds very similar to Char Siu (Honey, Soy, Hoisin etc glazed pork that goes red-ish, also a favorite here and probably more accessible for newcomers to Chinese food than the Sichuan twice cooked pork.
 

AT5760

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Thanks for all of the suggestions! I started a batch of twice cooked pork this morning. I'll let you know how it turns out tonight.
 

luuogle

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Pork belly cut into slices and stir-fried with green onions. Glazed with soy sauce and oyster sauce. Served with rice on the side.
 

Rangen

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I really enjoy braised pork belly. You can find recipes online by searching for Chairman Mao's favorite pork belly. I use the one from Fuchsia Dunlop's Hunan cookbook.
 

chefwp

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I'm late to the pork belly party, but over the holidays I cubed some PB and marinated it in garlic, soy, EVOO, and Korean gochujang overnight, and it joined some other meats for the oil fondue pot. It was certainly good enough to permanently join the table for our holiday tradition again next year. The last picture is a forkful of a piece post-frying.
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MarcelNL

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Oil fondue :p , and here I was, thinking we were the only with 70-ies nostalgia still doing that!
 

DitmasPork

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I work with pork belly quite a bit, my go-tos are Filipino Pork Adobo; Okinawan Rafute; Cantonese char siew and siu yuk. Pork belly is an awesome, versatile ingredient—a wonderful cut ripe for kitchen improvisation.

A couple of nights ago I made a lazy night dish—pork belly simmered with a bottle of Belgian style cidre, fennel seeds, bay laurel, garlic, black peppercorns, a bit of shoyu to boost umami, a little sugar and salt to balance it out. Brought to an initial simmer; transferred to a larger pan to evaporate some of the sauce; back into the clay pot to finish; took about 1.5–2 hours. Eaten with basmati and a dollop of Lao Gan Ma.

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AT5760

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I don't know, those lard-fired forges that TF uses have to be doing some damage to the environment! ;)

Thanks for all of the recipes and keep 'em coming.
 

parbaked

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I started using a lot more pork belly since I moved near Japantown and started cooking more Japanese food.
The Japanese market sells a really good duBreton pork belly from Canada, either sliced thin or in small 8-10 oz blocks.
I usually buy the blocks so I can adjust thickness depending on what I'm cooking.
These dishes feature smaller amounts of belly with veggies.
  • Tonjiru: Miso pork stew with root vegetables and konnyaku
  • Okonomiyaki, which has a lot of shredded cabbage to get the right texture
  • Shogayaki: (ginger pork) is usually made with loin chops, but belly is better.
  • Hoi Ko Ro: (Twice cooked pork) which is a popular Chinese dish in Japan.
I also like to use pork belly in my Japanese curry:
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