Pork Eye of round Ideas

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Skylar303

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Hello everyone, I don't usually cook pork (had a bad experience with someone else's pork) but seems okay when I do it although I probably over cook it a bit...

But I was looking for some recipe ideas. Most I googled seemed pretty basic roasts. Maybe a recipe that even if over cooked is still moist.

Thanks in advance! Hopefully I can whip something up for tonight, granted I have the ingredients on hand.

Ps. Tried to add tags like pork, recipe. But wouldn't let me separate them. Then eventually it stopped writing in that section.

Edit: It's a 2.5lb peice.
 

rmrf

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Bad experience, meaning got sick?

If you're worried about safety, my general advice is to get a thermapen or other good, precise thermometer and cook it to a temperature that you think is safe. I like the taste of cooking to 140F, but if you're worried, you can go higher or cook for longer. Reading sous vide websites can give you some confidence. I found this chart:

1649020877196.png

Following the poultry curve is probably overly safe?

I've never seen a pork eye of round. If its lean like a pork loin or something (which I'm assuming it is because its probably similar to a beef eye round), I would try slow cooking in the oven (200-250F) until the center reads safe (140 or 145 if you're really worried, keeping in mind it will keep cooking as it is resting). Wait for it to cool and hard sear in plenty of fat on the stove top. If you have a sous vide, that will be easier and safer but have less roast flavor. In my experience, it is very difficult to make a pork roast moist without a thermometer and thinking hard about bacteria safety and temperature.

If you're ok with salt, you can try a wet brine. It might make the roast more forgiving. I personally don't like the flavor, but I used to do it with thick pork chops before I got a thermometer.

Lean pork roast is pretty challenging for me without a thermometer. The timing is hard and you need to be precise or else it is dry. You can try covering up the dry flavor with a sauce or hot peppers. If you want to go away from a roast, I always like thinly sliced pork, seared with a wine sauce with mustard, butter and capers. I've also breaded and fried thin slice pork loin. By the time it sears, it probably is safe.

For next time, if you're worried about food safety, want a pork roast that will not dry out, and don't want to worry about temperatures, I'd recommend buying a pork butt (boston butt), taking the bone out, salting it, stuffing it with herbs and garlic and re-tying it, then roasting. Pork butt is pretty forgiving but fatty. If you over cook a pork butt, you get pulled pork which is still delicious. If you undercook a pork butt, you can slice thick slices and fry it and call it porchetta.

Happy cooking!
 
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Skylar303

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Bad experience, meaning got sick?

If you're worried about safety, my general advice is to get a thermapen or other good, precise thermometer and cook it to a temperature that you think is safe. I like the taste of cooking to 140F, but if you're worried, you can go higher or cook for longer. Reading sous vide websites can give you some confidence. I found this chart:

View attachment 173360
Following the poultry curve is probably overly safe?

I've never seen a pork eye of round. If its lean like a pork loin or something (which I'm assuming it is because its probably similar to a beef eye round), I would try slow cooking in the oven (200-250F) until the center reads safe (140 or 145 if you're really worried, keeping in mind it will keep cooking as it is resting). Wait for it to cool and hard sear in plenty of fat on the stove top. If you have a sous vide, that will be easier and safer but have less roast flavor. In my experience, it is very difficult to make a pork roast moist without a thermometer and thinking hard about bacteria safety and temperature.

If you're ok with salt, you can try a wet brine. It might make the roast more forgiving. I personally don't like the flavor, but I used to do it with thick pork chops before I got a thermometer.

Lean pork roast is pretty challenging for me without a thermometer. The timing is hard and you need to be precise or else it is dry. You can try covering up the dry flavor with a sauce or hot peppers. If you want to go away from a roast, I always like thinly sliced pork, seared with a wine sauce with mustard, butter and capers. I've also breaded and fried thin slice pork loin. By the time it sears, it probably is safe.

For next time, if you're worried about food safety, want a pork roast that will not dry out, and don't want to worry about temperatures, I'd recommend buying a pork butt (boston butt), taking the bone out, salting it, stuffing it with herbs and garlic and re-tying it, then roasting. Pork butt is pretty forgiving but fatty. If you over cook a pork butt, you get pulled pork which is still delicious. If you undercook a pork butt, you can slice thick slices and fry it and call it porchetta.

Happy cooking!
Hey thanks for the reply. Yeah super sick back when I was a kid, since then only pork I really ate was bacon... I also don't like meats rare because of it. Gimme a leather shoe over rare.

Sorry didn't get to it yesterday. But I'll try today or tomorrow. I do have a few good thermometers (they didn't apparently...) so maybe I'm just traumatized from that and shouldn't worry as long as the temp reaches where it should. I just generally Google recipes, nothing really in my wheelhouse.

I actually haven't heard of it until it was brought home and told to cook it. I have to google it, and yeah it's basically a beef eye of round. Yeah I definitely over cooked a loin last time I think internal was 160° when I pulled it. And then cooked more as it rested. But I used a thick honey based glaze so it still was tender and juicy. I may just chop it and make some chili haha... I haven't tried a salt brine, honestly it doesn't sound as appetizing as other marinades, although those would be different than brine but maybe in the same subcategory?

Ah thanks for some ideas, I generally don't cook big hunks of meats. So its nice to see what others are doing and like. I think I ended up with this cut because it was on sale... But I'll keep an eye out for some butts. 😄 Like you said either way you'll end up with something good.

Cheers!
 
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Put it in a pan with a lid just large enough to hold it. Add juice of 2-3 oranges, salt and pepper, some oregano, and some garlic. Cover it and stick it in the oven at 300-325 (depends on your oven really) for 3-4 hours.
 
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btbyrd

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I don't know if you have a circulator, but I'd hit it with some salt and then throw it in at 145 for four hours, pat it dry, hit it with some oil, herbs and pepper, and then throw it in the hottest oven you have (with convection if you have it) until it looks like you want to eat it.

Beef eye of round is best turned into ground beef and sold to someone else. It can also make halfway decent sandwich roast beef, but you have to cook it medium rare, slice it thin, and use it in sandwiches where you don't really care about tasting the beef that much.
 

Skylar303

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Put it in a pan with a lid just large enough to hold it. Add juice of 2-3 oranges, some oregano, and some garlic. Cover it and stick it in the oven at 300-325 (depends on your oven really) for 3-4 hours.
One idea I was thinking was garlic, lemon and rosemary. So pretty close. I tend to take various recipes and mash them for flavors. (Not cooking times, etc.)
 

Skylar303

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I don't know if you have a circulator, but I'd hit it with some salt and then throw it in at 145 for four hours, pat it dry, hit it with some oil, herbs and pepper, and then throw it in the hottest oven you have (with convection if you have it) until it looks like you want to eat it.

Beef eye of round is best turned into ground beef and sold to someone else. It can also make halfway decent sandwich roast beef, but you have to cook it medium rare, slice it thin, and use it in sandwiches where you don't really care about tasting the beef that much.
I don't I'm limited to very basic home kitchen equipment. I think the fanciest thing here is an electric can opener...

Ha I laughed at that first bit of the beef eye. Maybe that cut won't be on my short list. 😆
 
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Wasn’t really familiar with this cut so I googled. This guy’s advice seems sound. I heartily endorse his concept that getting the roast cooked to the correct temperature is 90% of the game

 
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