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"Pride Abrasives" stones?

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JDC

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I have pride abrasive 600, a soaker. Excellent stone, fast, consistent, very nice finish with deep contrast. Feedback is a bit like gesshin 4K.
 

Staystrapped

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It was the only time I saw someone mention them
 
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Yet-Another-Dave

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I've been following this because I'm curious about the line of stones. I just searched for reviews and didn't find many. Interpreting what I'm seeing these seem to be coarse & fast cutting for their grit ratings and very sensitive to pressure. It looks like anyone could successfully sharpen with them, but might prefer the feel of other stones.

I do note a couple respected woodworking stores are stocking this line, but I didn't find store reviews (yet?). Carefully reading the Amazon reviews might be the best bet for feedback at this point. (Buy some & tell us what you think? ;) )
 

Bert2368

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When I dropped the " knife merchant" and/or "sushi chef" from search string, several more videos of people sharpening with Pride Abrasives stones made since 2018 showed up in Google and YouTube results. Have not had time to watch, a lot are 30 minute or longer-
 

Knife2meatu

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Got experience with this line yet?

Coarsest waterstone I own is a Shapton glass 500. Don't own any 1,000 waterstones, next stone up is a Shapton pro 2,000, thinking to maybe fill 2 holes in progression with one purchase.
After goofing around for a while with the 4 stones I bought, I think the best I can do might be to just describe the 220 & 1k as being quite similar to a Pink Brick and a hypothetical Bester between the 700 & 1k. Except I guess the 1k Pride holds water a little better than those Besters.

Even after soaking the 220 drinks like a sieve; wore down pretty fast, produced a scratchy dark haze. Seems pretty fast though.

The 1k had a similar looking, but obviously more refined scratch pattern, produced mud easily, holds water decently.

A blurb I read in multiple places -- which makes me think it might come from the manufacturer -- stated that these Pride stones should be considered in some higher category of stones, along with Shapton Glass & Sigma Select IIs; adding " They perform better than Norton, Bester/Imanishi, Chosera and cheaper imported stones."

But I'd be hard pressed currently to say what justifies considering them markedly superior to Besters (up to 2k), or Nortons. Both of which seem to me similar enough; albeit perhaps not as aggressive as the Pride stones. Meanwhile, I'd say of the Cerax stones I've tried, that they were smoother feeling than the Pride stones for similar nominal grit, and produced more homogeneous scratches.

It may be the case that the Pride stones are in fact noticeably faster than those otherwise similar (vitrified bond, aluminium oxide) stones, but from what little experience I have with them at this point, I'm not willing to comment.
 

Staystrapped

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Well at least we have some first hand experience. Did your knives become sharp from them?
 
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I chimed in on another thread: Best coarse stone for crap steel

saying that I had some coming, but wanted to get some sessions in with them. I have the 220/1000 combo stone, along with the 8K/10K stone as well. I've had a few sessions spaced a few days apart to really let this set in, so here's what I can report back.

Speaking to the 220 grit stone specifically, I can say:
-It DOES remove material fast, and brings up a burr almost instantly on cheaper knives. I did NOT try this out on any good knives with higher quality and harder steels as I would not want to eat away that much metal and had no need to do so.

- It is hard and thirsty. I let mine soak for almost an hour while I was finishing up another project and it still needed way more water than any other stone I have as I went along. It has a very hard feel, and is loud enough to sound like you are murdering your knife on it.

- It leaves a "decent" finish, but I don't have much to compare it to other than an 300 grit Ultrasharp plate, as I have never used a stone this coarse before. It was sharp coming off the stone, but not like coming off a Shapton Glass 500.

- It leaves an almost sand-like slurry. I wouldn't even call it a mud, but it actually feels like sand. Very much a PITA to clean up.

Bottom line for me was that it worked well for hogging off metal and resetting a messed up bevel pretty quickly. I was not a real fan of using it, OR the 1K side, but your mileage may vary.

I will probably end up selling this one down the road, as I feel more comfortable using a diamond plate or a Shapton Glass 220 stone than this.

That said, this 220/1K may work well for somebody who is just using it as a fixer/1st stone, as you can work up a burr and move off it very quickly.
 
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Knife2meatu

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@M1k3

That channel's videos about the Pride stones are, as far I can tell, the best information available about them.

I found it interesting to note that he didn't like the results nearly as much in previous videos until he got the 8k & 10k, probably because those two stones are harder bonded, produce less slurry, and finish more easily.

Another interesting bit is that when he reviewed the house-brand Sharpening Supplies stones -- which he believed to be rebranded RH Preyda, but are far more likely rebranded Pride stones -- he had noticeably less of anything positive to say about them.
 

Bert2368

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Thanks! Looks like 220 will be a reasonable choice for dammage a little short of wanting power tools instead.

A 220/1,000 showed up in the mail yesterday, about $30 delivered. Came in a pine and masonite box with some foam inside and bubble wrap outside, was well packed.

What do I have that needs a grit that coarse? Brush hook!

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Slim278

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A bastard file and scythe stone are your best bet on that brush hook.
 

Bert2368

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A bastard file and scythe stone are your best bet on that brush hook.
Thanks!

I do have several appropriate files and a "torpedo" shaped scythe stone. About 30 seconds after laying the edge on the 120 grit stone, I knew what I would be using next time

Was largely curious to find out what the 120/1,000 combination stone behaved like. Also, I will now get to find out how the 8" x 16" stone flattening tool works, that 120 is very friable, almost like a piece of sandstone.

After using the 120 and then 1,000 Pride stone, I used a 500 Shapton glass. The brush hook will now slice copier paper like my EDC knife, at least until the fat spine starts to wedge. Yes, that was overkill. Next time I need to touch the brush hook up I will certainly use files and possibly the scythe stone.

This brush hook is a Chinese blacksmith/small factory item from a hardware store in Liuyang, Changsha county, Hunan province. Has a makers "chop" stamp on it, I doubt any one outside the county buys them though. It's made out of truck leaf springs and not overly hardened.

Boy did the outgoing customs in Beijing look at me oddly when they checked my bags, I had bought 3 of 'em for about $3.00 USA each. The Chinese guys were WAY more polite than the USA Customs dudes in LA were though!
 

Bert2368

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I found something else to use the 220/1,000 Pride stone on.

She-who-must-be-obeyed decided to use a wood chisel to scrape hardened glue off of several many cutting board project glue ups. The hard wood in question had previously been through a wide drum sander as well. Needless to say, that chisel needed more than a touch up, wish I'd taken a "before" picture of how the cutting edge had been rolled back for the full width of the cutting edge.

The 220 did the heavy lifting FAST. The 1,000 removed the worst of the scratches from 220 reasonably quickly too- After these two grits and 5 minutes, this chisel was restored to a condition only mildly annoying.

All in all, at around $30 delivered? This Pride 220/1,000 is an OK stone setup for initial fixing of the kind of dammages some people inflict on knives or tools. It's a consumable- Wearing this cheaper stone out instead of an Atoma or Shapton is sensible and the speed it cuts moderately hard tool steel is a nice feature.

After the Pride combo, I moved chisel about 2mm further into the sharpening guide and went to Shapton Glass 500 to begin a micro bevel, was very happy I hadn't STARTED with that 500 considering how much finer scratches from SG 500 were. Kept same angle for Shapton Pro 2,000, finished with a few strokes on loaded suede and plain smooth leather. Chisel shaved.

If I were going to use a chisel for finish work myself, I'd go to higher grits. At least 5,000 + strop on diamond dust loaded copy paper. But Miss "I don't sharpen, that's YOUR contribution" is less than half done with her project, going to work on it next weekend- 2,000 is good enough to scrape glue blobs. When the Xmas bows and name tags are on the packaged boards, I will break out that 5,000.

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