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Push cut vs Pull cut vs chop

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M1k3

Buy stainless! Sell carbon!
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Oh yea, doing that would be totally dumb. You use the spine to just scrape stuff to the side, not when you’re lifting it up on the blade.






Hmm, looks like this technique has some supporters! ;)

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M1k3

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ok. I thought this was a place to discuss kitchen knives and their usage. I see I was wrong.
It is.
Just messing with Ian.

Glad you're engaging instead of starting 20+ threads with questions on various knives and steel and completely ignoring everyone's comments and questions. Then the first engagement back is to crap all over a foreign postal system's performance during an international pandemic.
 

juice

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Me too, my friend. In my professional writing, I will alter my wording so that the last line in every paragraph is at least a quarter of the page in width.
Gotta avoid those widows!

I have so many issues to overcome with academic writing, not the least of which being that after many years as a journalist, a sentence is a paragraph.

And those sentences are short and clear.

#Sigh
 

Goorackerelite

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I love pull cuts the most, They release food so cleanly and it just feels so satisfying. I wish I could pull cut all the time on every thing!
 
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Twigg

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My favorite is the push cut. It feels the most natural to me. BDL's G&G is next. Yes, I use to read Cheftalk a lot. I know BDL was polarizing at times, but always tried to help. Almost caused me to buy a Sabatier. I feel that the pull cut can give the cleanest cuts though, but I only use it with my Sujihiki and Takohiki.
 

ian

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I think BDL’s pretty universally appreciated here. I almost bought a Masamoto HC years ago because of him, for better or worse. :)
 

Twigg

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I was sad to read that he passed in 2016. Even though he left the knife forums, I like knowing he was still out there.

HC and not the KS?😁
 
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FishmanDE

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Its all personal preference/ based on the job. I rock cut generally because that's where I feel like I have the best control to speed ratio thereby giving me the best consistency. Pull cutting, or slicing, for me has the most control, but the speed suffers. Chopping has the highest speed but least control for me. And push cutting is only for when I'm making decisive cuts through something that needs additional force to get through (i.e. block of cheese, or bone). If you want to talk about trying different styles to the same ingredient and how that affects the edge, Chopping does the most damage IMO as you have the least control and it rolls down hill based on my previous statements on control. In regards to the type of steel vs style, I think its a matter of right tool for the right job. Every steel has its strengths and weaknesses, it's up to the chef to chose a steel which highlights the requirements of the jobs that needs to be done. There isn't a one style/ steel/ design fits-all solution.
 

ian

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I was sad to read that he passed in 2016. Even though he left the knife forums, I like knowing he was still out there.

HC and not the KS?😁
ya, he was all about the hc.
 

FishmanDE

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I also dont think you should read too deeply into various knife reviews. Often times most people have different motives for uses. For example, wedging. I've read a lot of people knock knives for wedging and I cant for the life of me as a professional chef figure out who actually cares about that. And if for some reason that did matter to someone, its more of a matter of working with more appropriately sized or processed ingredients I.e. if the carrot wedges, half it length wise first instead of just working it whole or buy smaller carrots. I've had my share of crazy chefs flip out on me for nonsense, and not once has anyone ever said something to me about something like wedging. point is, know what matters for your job/situation and buy for that.
 

ian

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Hey man, whatever you're into. Like I said, motivations are different. My top priority is edge retention and durability personally. Different strokes :cool:
Yea, I hear that. I cook at home, no need for retention. All I care about is the feel and ease of the cut, and a bit of food release.

Also, I care deeply about the feel and ease of sharpening.
 

Keith Sinclair

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Reminds me many decades ago. Got thrown into banquet prep at Sheraton Waikiki. Cook gave me sample cut of how he wanted button mushrooms.

Then gave me 5 cases. Speed was expected. Learned how to chop
with same thickness slices. Was slower at first didn't want to screw up. By the time finished was doing it at speed.
 

Ruso

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I also dont think you should read too deeply into various knife reviews. Often times most people have different motives for uses. For example, wedging. I've read a lot of people knock knives for wedging and I cant for the life of me as a professional chef figure out who actually cares about that. And if for some reason that did matter to someone, its more of a matter of working with more appropriately sized or processed ingredients I.e. if the carrot wedges, half it length wise first instead of just working it whole or buy smaller carrots. I've had my share of crazy chefs flip out on me for nonsense, and not once has anyone ever said something to me about something like wedging. point is, know what matters for your job/situation and buy for that.
It’s very common that profesionals and home users/enthusiasts have different priorities. This is across many hobbies, not just knives.
 
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