Question about TF Maboroshi

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Koakuma

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I am very happy with it so far. Test cut an onion and a big carrot with it. It cuts like dream. I can tell the grind is a lot better than the Maboroshi that i got. Sharpness is just as good as the Maboroshi. can't wait to take it to work and put it through the pace.
 

lemeneid

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No. Confirmed by TF directly. Morihei Hisamoto Ku is just soft iron cladding in lieu of the SS. Same core steel and HT. In other words the Ku is not prelaminated bar stock but is forge welded in-house by TF. The final blade aesthetic is 'nashiji' though as opposed to the semi-polished/hammered Maboroshi
The Ku Morihei is Blue2 IIRC. The non-Ku version is White1.
 

wind88

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It was mislabelled as blue 2 but is actually white 1 for all the TF Hisamoto.
 

lemeneid

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It was mislabelled as blue 2 but is actually white 1 for all the TF Hisamoto.
also, i rather get the SS morihei version. TF's cladding isn't gummy at all, and real easy to thin with too
 

nyc

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I’m thinking of picking up a TF Maboroshi when I’m in Tokyo year end. The options are either from TF direct or via Tsubaya. Maybe Morihei if they have any.
Thing is, I’m keen on the finger rest at the choil and a Wa handle and it does appear that the OEM ones via Tsubaya for instance don’t have it - at least that’s what it appears to be on their website. Anyone familiar with the variations of TF available at either Tsubaya or Morihei?
 

Corradobrit1

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I’m thinking of picking up a TF Maboroshi when I’m in Tokyo year end. The options are either from TF direct or via Tsubaya. Maybe Morihei if they have any.
Thing is, I’m keen on the finger rest at the choil and a Wa handle and it does appear that the OEM ones via Tsubaya for instance don’t have it - at least that’s what it appears to be on their website. Anyone familiar with the variations of TF available at either Tsubaya or Morihei?
Any reason you want the finger notch? In my experience it provides little to no functional benefits and merely reduces the length of useable cutting edge effectively rendering a 210 gyuto to a 195-200. Go to the shop and pick out a special local sale-only version. It will be a neat souvenir, plus you may get a chance to say hi to TF IV himself and the shop dog.
 

Koakuma

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I think one reason to want the TF notch is its iconic to TF knives. If I get the chance to go to Japan, I will definitely make a trip to buy a TF in person.
 

parbaked

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The TF notch doesn't make the effective length any shorter unless you choose to use it that way.
It provides a place for your middle finger so that you can choke up on the blade even more than without it.
One can still use a regular pinch grip, on the emoto, without using the notch.
I don't see any negative.
I like!
 

parbaked

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If you like TF knives, visit the shop.
There are usually unique handles and old stock that didn't sell to peruse. (excuse the bad phone pics)
display.jpg
display2.jpg
 

Corradobrit1

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The TF notch doesn't make the effective length any shorter unless you choose to use it that way.
It provides a place for your middle finger so that you can choke up on the blade even more than without it.
One can still use a regular pinch grip, on the emoto, without using the notch.
I don't see any negative.
I like!
What I mean is that when you choke up in a 2 finger pinch grip the heel is pushed further back when the blade has the notch. Edge length with and without the finger notch is the same.
 

Corradobrit1

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If you like TF knives, visit the shop.
There are usually unique handles and old stock that didn't sell to peruse. (excuse the bad phone pics)
View attachment 61784 View attachment 61785
Yes, red handles and urushi are the typical shop-only offerings. Then there are those little one-off specials that have been gathering dust for years, waiting to be discovered. I think I could spend hours in the shop and workshop area out back.
 
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Corradobrit1

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I think one reason to want the TF notch is its iconic to TF knives. If I get the chance to go to Japan, I will definitely make a trip to buy a TF in person.
Thats as good a reason as any
 

parbaked

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What I mean is that when you choke up in a 2 finger pinch grip the heel is pushed further back when the blade has the notch. Edge length with and without the finger notch is the same.
You miss my point.

With the notch , you can still pinch grip in the same place as if the knife didn't have a notch.
The notch doesn't impact the regular pinch grip except that your middle finger isn't rubbing against the choil.
You don't have to choke up. It's an option.

The notch ALSO allows you to choke up, in addition to the regular pinch grip.
Therefore one can pinch grip in two places instead of just one.
You get more choices..win win.
 

Corradobrit1

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You miss my point.

With the notch , you can still pinch grip in the same place as if the knife didn't have a notch.
The notch doesn't impact the regular pinch grip except that your middle finger isn't rubbing against the choil.
You don't have to choke up. It's an option.

The notch ALSO allows you to choke up, in addition to the regular pinch grip.
Therefore one can pinch grip in two places instead of just one.
You get more choices..win win.
Yes, that is true. I usually choke up with middle finger as far as the blade allows, so it all depends how you address the knife.
 

HRC_64

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I think one reason to want the TF notch is its iconic to TF knives. If I get the chance to go to Japan, I will definitely make a trip to buy a TF in person.
Gyutos are traditonally western handled in Japan because they are "western knives" (ryo).

TF notch is was originally an 'innovation' since it mimic the emoto grip (from a wa-handle)
on a knife without an emoto---ie, TF's standard western-handled knife--

IMHO if you order a WA handle get without a notch since its useless.
IMHO if you order a YO handle get WITH a notch in larger sizes (like 240)

On smaller YO-knives its not standard (see his 150),
for reasons mentioned above by CorradoBriit.
 

nyc

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Thanks for the feedback.
I think the finger notch is distinctively TF. That’s the main reason I would have it. Looks like I’ll be heading to his store then.
 

parbaked

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1st picture are red handled Denkas on the top shelf and regular Maboroshi on the bottom shelf.
The 1st knife on the left on the bottom shelf is a Maboroshi santoku with handle from a magnolia tree growing outside the shop.
TF took me outside to show me where he cut a branch off. I didn't buy it because it was not stabilized and had huge gaps!

2nd picture are single bevel knives. the old stock and urushi handled Denkas were in boxes under the single bevel knives.

I always call ahead to see what days TF is in the shop (the factory is in a completely different location).
If TF is there he will also scratch your name in your knife:
engrave.jpg
 

nyc

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@parbaked would you say that there’s a fair amount of stock to choose from to enable one to choose a knife without any (or as little as possible) fit and finish issues?
 

Corradobrit1

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I've not heard of any personal visitors who have complained about the lack of choice. When Inzite went he said they brought out over 5 red handled 240 Denka's. You will NOT have a problem finding a 'good' one, so long as you know what to look for.
 

wind88

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Yeah, he also busted in and screamed “money no problem”.
 

nyc

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@Corradobrit1 I figured if they let me have access to something flat to lay the knife on, I may have a chance of spotting any issues. But what should I keep a look out for? From what I read here, it’s the grind issues that have become legendary. Besides that handle install as well if memory serves me well.
 

Corradobrit1

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@Corradobrit1 I figured if they let me have access to something flat to lay the knife on, I may have a chance of spotting any issues. But what should I keep a look out for? From what I read here, it’s the grind issues that have become legendary. Besides that handle install as well if memory serves me well.
Exactly. Roll the edge on a flat surface and look for holes. Thats easy. Then angle the edge of the knife against a light source and look for unusual light reflections. This would indicate if there are overgrinds further up the blade road that may not be evident until you sharpen (if you're a home user I don't think these should concern you too much).

I like thinner grinds behind the edge so get them weighed and check how thin they are. The agricultural ones are easy to spot.

Check spines and choils for sharp edges. If you find the perfect knife but there is a sharp area ask if they will ease that area in the workshop outback. They have grinding equipment there so shouldn't be an imposition.

Alternatively get a Morihei Hisamoto W#1 (aka the pimped out TF Maboroshi).......
 

Corradobrit1

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I am very happy with it so far. Test cut an onion and a big carrot with it. It cuts like dream. I can tell the grind is a lot better than the Maboroshi that i got. Sharpness is just as good as the Maboroshi. can't wait to take it to work and put it through the pace.
I have to agree with your experience. I've been getting to know my 240 gyuto over the past few days and it takes the Maboroshi to a new level. I love the reactive iron cladding. Never thought I would say that but its so much more aesthetically pleasing compared to the SS. It takes a patina like I've not seen before with other san-mai, although thats probably not saying much as I've only used a Konosuke Fujiyama FM and Mazaki. I'm getting light irridescent blues and oranges both in the core steel and cladding. No splotchy blacks and grays. Hope you're finding your tip as good as mine.
I touched up the edge for the first time on a Gesshin 4K stone this evening as the factory edge wasn't toothy enough for me. Took to the stone like butter. Couple of passes and it was razor sharp. Edge retention should be up there with Mab as they are both TF W#1 to 65HRC, but we will see.

I'm really having a hard time finding fault. Only F&F issue is a slightly rough choil which I'll ease at some point with emery paper. Price is unbelievable considering the amount of work done on the Jnats by hand. About 50-60% of the price of a regular TF Mab.

Overall I'm impressed enough that I bought the 210 version just in case this was a one-off collaboration with Morihei. I got the last one I could find.
 
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nyc

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Exactly. Roll the edge on a flat surface and look for holes. Thats easy. Then angle the edge of the knife against a light source and look for unusual light reflections. This would indicate if there are overgrinds further up the blade road that may not be evident until you sharpen (if you're a home user I don't think these should concern you too much).

I like thinner grinds behind the edge so get them weighed and check how thin they are. The agricultural ones are easy to spot.

Check spines and choils for sharp edges. If you find the perfect knife but there is a sharp area ask if they will ease that area in the workshop outback. They have grinding equipment there so shouldn't be an imposition.

Alternatively get a Morihei Hisamoto W#1 (aka the pimped out TF Maboroshi).......
Thanks for the pointers.
The Hisamoto is very tempting. A rebadged TF as it were ... with better fit & finish. And that kasumi looks great. For myself, I wonder just how important having a TF is or should I just go the Hisamoto route. Tsubaya have their own TF version as well.
One wonders if TF is aware of the issues, and if he does, does he even care.
 
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