recommendation progression sharpening stones

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camilorosso

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I am going to buy a set of sharpening stones, but I am not sure of the progression of these. What would be the best option, they are knives for my kitchen, and I am buying Japanese knives, I want to try a good edge

400-1000-8000
1000-5000-10000
1000-8000-12000

I appreciate your recommendations
 

HumbleHomeCook

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Shapton Glass 500 and 2k will handle a ton. The Pro/Kuromaku line are alternates.

I like the SG4k but it's been replaced by a Belgian Blue. I tried 8k edges and didn't like them. Too refined for my tasks.
 

Cliff

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It also depends on the knives and types of steel.

I like Shapton Glass 320-->2K-->6K for most applications. For me, 4K is in-between. I'll use the 1K or 2K for butchery and 6K for general work.
 

Pie

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I am going to buy a set of sharpening stones, but I am not sure of the progression of these. What would be the best option, they are knives for my kitchen, and I am buying Japanese knives, I want to try a good edge

400-1000-8000
1000-5000-10000
1000-8000-12000

I appreciate your recommendations
Id pick the first progression, although I’d maybe drop the high stone down to a 3-6k. I find super high grit stones less useful in the home kitchen.

400 grit range I really like, taking out small chips or light material removal made easy without accidentally taking off too much. Great for those random paring knives and German stainless. Naniwa pro 400/1k/3k could do just about anything, although I hear the 800 is preferred over 1k.
 

Delat

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I think it partially depends on budget and initial use case. If your knives have decent edges and you just want to maintain them then a 2k stone like a Shapton Pro is a good single-stone start. If you want (and can afford) a full set, then I think SG500, SG1000 or SP2000, and SG4000 is nice full set.

For typical sharpening I almost never use the SG500 though. And the SG1000 also gets used rarely. Almost all of my usual sharpening is on the SG4000. If I find getting to an apex is taking to long then I drop down to the SG1000.

I use the SG500 for thinning mainly, and cutting brand new bevels. If you have a beater/practice knife and are still learning, then it's great for quick feedback/results.
 

MowgFace

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Personally I don't really think the specific brands of stones will matter all that much. Everyone has personal preferences.

Choose whether you would prefer Splash and go, or Soaking then figure out what your budget is and grab something in the below ranges.

300-600 Low Grit
800-2000 Medium Grit
3000-6000 Finishing
Stone flattening method - not optional
Newspaper - High tech strop
 
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BarryMM

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For regular home use, 2k is max for most cutting tasks. My wife likes the 800 naniwa finish the most. Gives lots of bite.
 

MowgFace

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For regular home use, 2k is max for most cutting tasks. My wife likes the 800 naniwa finish the most. Gives lots of bite.

My fiancé used to prefer 2K edges, but I started working on her favorite user (180 S. Tanaka B#2 Dammy) with an Aizu, and she has been converted, even if on the low end it’s only just a touch finer
 

Stockman

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I keep it very simple in the kitchen.
Shapton Pro 320 - Only for thinning and chip removal, resetting very banged up edges. (normaly when the mother in law thinks a Nakiri is a bone Cleaver)
Shapton Pro 1000 - Quickly produces and removes a burr, shaving sharp yet toothy, perfect for proteins and most food prep.
Shapton Pro 2000 - A great finishing and touch up stone, will cleanly slice free hanging paper towel and fingers, have never required anything higher in the kitchen.

The pressure applied on the stones can also make each one produce differing results, and in all reality, I could get away with using the SP1000 as a one stone set-up that would be more than sufficient as a home cook.

The 5,000, 8,000 and 12,000 only for specialty knives and cuts, way too refined/polished for general food prep.
 
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BarryMM

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My fiancé used to prefer 2K edges, but I started working on her favorite user (180 S. Tanaka B#2 Dammy) with an Aizu, and she has been converted, even if on the low end it’s only just a touch finer
Funny how personal that is don't you think? I once finished a #2 white on a 6k king. She hated the lack of feedback, felt it wasn't cutting and like magic the vegetables turned into slices:D
 

BarryMM

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I keep it very simple in the kitchen.
Shapton Pro 320 - Only for thinning and chip removal, resetting very banged up edges. (normaly when the mother in law thinks a Nakiri is a bone Cleaver)
Shapton Pro 1000 - Quickly produces and removes a burr, shaving sharp yet toothy, perfect for proteins and most food prep.
Shapton Pro 2000 - A great finishing and touch up stone, will cleanly slice free hanging paper towel and fingers, have never required anything higher in the kitchen.

The pressure applied on the stones can also make each one produce differing results, and in all reality, I could get away with using the SP1000 as a one stone set-up that would be more than sufficient as a home cook.

The 5,000, 8,000 and 12,000 only for specialty knives and cuts, way too refined/polished for general food prep.
My one stone setup is the Naniwa 800. If going to friends I do bring the pink brick 220 sometimes because very dull knives:D
 

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My one stone setup is the Naniwa 800. If going to friends I do bring the pink brick 220 sometimes because very dull knives:D
The SP1000 is probably closer to 800 than 1000, so prob a very similar finish to the Nan.
I keep the Shapton synths for home, it's a Norton India Course/Fine Carb for the mates, great stone for turning cheap blunt knives into cheap sharp knives.
 

Benuser

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The SP1000 is probably closer to 800 than 1000, so prob a very similar finish to the Nan.
I keep the Shapton synths for home, it's a Norton India Course/Fine Carb for the mates, great stone for turning cheap blunt knives into cheap sharp knives.
The end-result with a Naniwa Pro 800 is much finer: some 1200 JIS. Not far from the Shapton Pro 2k, which will be around 1500 JIS.
 

camilorosso

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Lo mantengo muy simple en la cocina.
Shapton Pro 320: solo para adelgazamiento y eliminación de virutas, reajustando bordes muy golpeados. (normalmente cuando la suegra piensa que un Nakiri es un cuchillo de carnicero)
Shapton Pro 1000: produce y elimina rápidamente una rebaba, afeitando afilado pero con dientes, perfecto para proteínas y la mayoría de la preparación de alimentos.
Shapton Pro 2000 - Una gran piedra de acabado y retoque, cortará limpiamente toallas de papel y dedos colgantes, nunca ha requerido nada más alto en la cocina.

La presión aplicada sobre las piedras también puede hacer que cada una produzca resultados diferentes y, en realidad, podría salirme con la mía usando el SP1000 como una configuración de una piedra que sería más que suficiente como cocinero casero.

Los 5,000, 8,000 y 12,000 solo para cuchillos y cortes especiales, demasiado refinados/pulidos para la preparación general de alimentos.
gracias por su tiempo, me gustaría una explicación más sobre la presión.
 
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I'm a bit late to the party but will toss this out for thought ... I too am also a beginner to stones and I'm purely a home kitchen light use kind of guy. I do not have any Japanese knives yet.

Short answer to your question about progression and as many have already said ... I chose 500/1000/5000. My 5000 is reported to be closer to a 6000. Personally, I don't have a need to go higher than that and in reality not even higher that 1000 (yet) in my home kitchen and based on what I do but that will depend more on exactly what you're doing.

Read on if you feel so inclined ....

I got a SG 500 double thick as a low grit stone for those cases where you need/want to set the bevel and move on. It does also well at fixing small chips. If the edge is decent I don't find a need to start here with normal sharpening but others may. When you need/want it it's a great stone to have. I love it even though I've only used it 3 times and highly recommend it as a low grit if your budget permits.

For medium stone I bought a Suehiro Cerax 1000. This is a soaking stone and I love the feel of it and it seems to be a quick cutting stone to me. Feels nice and I get good feedback when I'm sharpening with it. I expect that most of my use will be with this stone once there's a good edge on a knife and barring any chips/damage. For chips/damage a quick drop to the SG 500 fixes it quickly. I also highly recommend this as a medium grit stone.

I also got a Suehiro Rika 5000 - I used it once, it worked well and I enjoyed it but I thought that for my use I'm better off with the edge left by the Cerax 1000. Based on my one use I'd recommend it also. Be aware that the finish from this stone is reported by some as "hazy" vs. a mirror polish. To some that matters - some like it some prefer mirror like. It doesn't matter to me as it cuts just fine and I'm not looking to read a newspaper off it :)

I originally also bought a SP 220 for those more heavily damaged knives/bigger chips/broken tips ... etc. It was damaged so I sent it back to get a replacement but it never arrived. Probably for the better since I have not needed it since but when I do need something at that level I'll get another. I also have a belt sander and I had a knife that I would have used the 220 on to fix a tip and some pretty good size chips but I got tired of waiting for the SP 220 so I hit it quick with the belt sander and then moved on to the SG 500. My belt sander skills are not great and I was able to easily smooth the edge out, set the bevel, and move on with the SG 500. Again, great low grit stone!

I'd give careful consideration to soaking vs. splash-n-go stones. The reason I went with the above setup was that since I was just starting out and I thought I'd go for good stones at reasonable/lower budget. I went back and forth between the Cerax 1000/Rika 5000 vs. Naniwa Pro 800/3000 combination and eventually went with the lower price and I also wanted to get the soaking stone experience (Cerax/Rika). I'm glad that I did but I also find that waiting for soaking of the stones to cause me not to sharpen when I would have if I had the splash-n-go stones. As such I will most likely get the Naniwa Pro 800/3000 stones at some point soon. Soaking is not a big deal but does require some planning sometimes when I don't want to at the end of a long day vs. with splash-n-go it would be just grab the stones and get to it. Again, not a big deal at all with a little planning but something to consider. All of the Shapton options as well as the Naniwa Pro stones (800/3000) are splash-n-go. Another splash-n-go option to consider might be the Suehiro Debado line. I have no experience with them but have read good things with the only downside I've seen being that they seem quite pricey so not a recommendation but just mention as a another possible splash-n-go consideration.

One other thing I'd say to keep in mind is that I've heard that not every stone is good with both Japanese steels and Western steels. When I was choosing I was careful to research and get stones that are good with both Japanese and Western steels. I think all of my above mentioned stones meet that criteria.

For manufacturers I don't think you can go wrong with any of the options mentioned - Shapton, Naniwa, and Suehiro are all highly spoken of and recommended.

Good luck and enjoy the journey!

M
 

camilorosso

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I'm a bit late to the party but will toss this out for thought ... I too am also a beginner to stones and I'm purely a home kitchen light use kind of guy. I do not have any Japanese knives yet.

Short answer to your question about progression and as many have already said ... I chose 500/1000/5000. My 5000 is reported to be closer to a 6000. Personally, I don't have a need to go higher than that and in reality not even higher that 1000 (yet) in my home kitchen and based on what I do but that will depend more on exactly what you're doing.

Read on if you feel so inclined ....

Obtuve una SG 500 de doble grosor como piedra de grano bajo para aquellos casos en los que necesitas/quieres ajustar el bisel y seguir adelante. También funciona bien para arreglar pequeños chips. Si el borde es decente, no encuentro la necesidad de comenzar aquí con un afilado normal, pero otros pueden hacerlo. Cuando lo necesitas/quieres, es una gran piedra para tener. Me encanta a pesar de que solo lo he usado 3 veces y lo recomiendo encarecidamente como grano bajo si su presupuesto lo permite.

Para la piedra mediana compré una Suehiro Cerax 1000. Esta es una piedra de remojo y me encanta su tacto y me parece una piedra de corte rápido. Se siente bien y recibo buenos comentarios cuando estoy afilando con él. Espero que la mayor parte de mi uso sea con esta piedra una vez que haya un buen borde en un cuchillo y salvo cualquier astilla/daño. Para astillas/daños, una caída rápida al SG 500 lo arregla rápidamente. También lo recomiendo encarecidamente como una piedra de grano medio.

También compré un Suehiro Rika 5000. Lo usé una vez, funcionó bien y lo disfruté, pero pensé que para mi uso, estoy mejor con la ventaja que deja el Cerax 1000. Basado en mi único uso, recomendaría también. Tenga en cuenta que algunos informan que el acabado de esta piedra es "borroso" en comparación con un pulido de espejo. A algunos eso les importa, a algunos les gusta, algunos prefieren un espejo. No me importa, ya que corta muy bien y no estoy buscando leer un periódico. :)

Originalmente, también compré un SP 220 para esos cuchillos más dañados/astillas más grandes/puntas rotas... etc. Estaba dañado, así que lo devolví para obtener un reemplazo, pero nunca llegó. Probablemente para mejor, ya que no lo he necesitado desde entonces, pero cuando necesito algo de ese nivel, obtendré otro. También tengo una lijadora de banda y tenía un cuchillo en el que habría usado la 220 para arreglar una punta y algunas virutas de buen tamaño, pero me cansé de esperar a la SP 220, así que lo golpeé rápidamente con la lijadora de banda y luego Pasé a la SG 500. Mis habilidades con la lijadora de banda no son muy buenas y pude alisar fácilmente el borde, ajustar el bisel y continuar con la SG 500. Nuevamente, ¡excelente piedra de grano bajo!

Consideraría detenidamente las piedras de remojo frente a las de salpicadura. La razón por la que elegí la configuración anterior fue que, dado que recién comenzaba, pensé que elegiría buenas piedras con un presupuesto razonable o más bajo. Iba y venía entre la combinación de Cerax 1000/Rika 5000 vs. Naniwa Pro 800/3000 y finalmente opté por el precio más bajo y también quería obtener la experiencia de la piedra de remojo (Cerax/Rika). Me alegro de haberlo hecho, pero también encuentro que esperar a que se empapen las piedras hace que no afile cuando lo hubiera hecho si tuviera las piedras splash-n-go. Como tal, lo más probable es que obtenga las piedras Naniwa Pro 800/3000 en algún momento pronto. Remojar no es un gran problema, pero a veces requiere algo de planificación cuando no quiero hacerlo al final de un largo día en comparación con splash-n-go, sería simplemente agarrar las piedras y llegar a ellas. Otra vez, no es un gran problema con un poco de planificación, pero es algo a considerar. Todas las opciones de Shapton, así como las piedras Naniwa Pro (800/3000), son splash-n-go. Otra opción de splash-n-go a considerar podría ser la línea Suehiro Debado. No tengo experiencia con ellos, pero he leído cosas buenas y el único inconveniente que he visto es que parecen bastante caros, por lo que no es una recomendación, solo mencione como otra posible consideración para salpicar y llevar.

Otra cosa que diría a tener en cuenta es que he oído que no todas las piedras son buenas tanto con los aceros japoneses como con los aceros occidentales. Cuando estaba eligiendo, tuve cuidado de investigar y obtener piedras que fueran buenas tanto con aceros japoneses como occidentales. Creo que todas mis piedras mencionadas anteriormente cumplen con ese criterio.

Para los fabricantes, no creo que pueda equivocarse con ninguna de las opciones mencionadas: se habla mucho de Shapton, Naniwa y Suehiro y se recomiendan.

¡Buena suerte y disfruta del

Thanks for your time, excelnete answer
 

Benuser

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i decide for thid progression
1000 3000 8000 12000

yhanks for your coments
More stones, more troubles. Hard to imagine what kind of double-bevelled would benefit from the step from 8k to 12k. The only 12k I use — Shapton Pro — doesn't give a very different end result from a 8k Naniwa Junpaku. If the 3k happens to be the Naniwa Pro, it delivers an end result of some 4k. The advantage of further refinement is very, very small. I use those grits basically for touching up simple carbons.
At the other side of the spectrum, 1k as the coarsest one can be problematic. The only reason to advise 1k as a first stone in a progression is the little risk of heavy damage. For restoring a geometry it's really slow, which makes errors more likely to occur. Sharpening is not about putting an edge at the end of a piece of steel. It's about restoring a previous configuration at another place, and should therefore start by thinning behind the edge. Even with the least abrasion resistant carbons I don't see myself starting a full sharpening by thinning with a 1k. An additional reason is in better edge stability with especially Aogami Super when starting with a few strokes with a coarse stone.
My typical progression is Shapton Glass 320, Naniwa Pro 800, Naniwa Pro 3k.
 

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Atoma 1200 will keep your stones flat, and cut as fast as a 400 grit water stone. If you follow up with a shapton hr 4k you have a nice setup. The feedback of the Atoma is not grate, so a 1k gs is nice to have. For a better polish a 6k gs is nice to have. I have allot of 8k and finer stones, but they are used for razors.
A 2k stone might be all you need if you have soft knifes, and are not getting into thinning your knifes. I like the Naniwa pro 2k.

If you are into polished toothy edges, vetrified diamond stones are grate, especially on soft stainless steel. Feedback is not grate though.
 

Matt Jacobs

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Shapton pro 2k I use 80% of the time
sometimes I drop to a Chosera 800 if need be
I have an atoma 400 for flatening
Rikka 5k if I really want to spend some time on multiple knives at once but barely used.
 
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