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Removing rust

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AnxiousCowboy

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Either some ******* used my knife and didnt dry it properly or my stupid ass left it a bit damp over the weekend... Either way I have some rust on the front and back of my usuba and this needs to go away....

How do I remove it? fine grit paper?
 

UglyJoe

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That would work. If the rust hasn't set in too deep you can also get it with stone slurry.
 

Ichi

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BKF works well but leaves film, I found Never Dull works best. :thumbsup2:
 

JohnnyChance

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flitz works well, depending on how set the rust is.
Which flitz do you like? I checked their website and they had it seemed 1000 different products with very little discernible difference between any of them.
 

EdipisReks

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uh, i've used stuff in a white bottle and i've used stuff in a black bottle. the current bottle describes it as "for metal, plastic and fiberglass. restores paint too." all of it has been green and slightly weird in texture.
 

DwarvenChef

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There are many ways of removing rust, the question is, what results do you want and how do you want to get there. Not to mention what amount and type of rust your dealing with.

Being a minimalist when it comes to removing rust I have a few set ways that work for me, but would probably horrify others :p Most ways don't only remove rust but also remove the edge, so expect to sharpen afterwards.

Unless I have blaze orange flaky rust (active rusting) I don't bother with the pastes and powders. They work fine for some but I don't like the resulting "Shiny" patchy look that is left behind. My way of dealing with the excess tarnishing and early rust is to cut an onion in half and rub the flats with the flat section of juicy onion. This generally eats away any built up gunk on the blade (patina as well...) and leaves it a uniform finish so to speak. Potatoes work just as well sometimes. I have not had any issues with hard deep rust on my kitchen knives but have come close.

Than again most of my knives look better with battle scars and I'm just happy see them grow :) so I rarely try to fix anything that is not almost active rust :p
 

kalaeb

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I use chromium oxide paste on the end of a cork and apply ample pressure for light surface rust, for deeper rust I pull out the 2000 grit wet/dry paper.
 

tk59

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I generally use BKF powder that I make into a paste. If that doesn't work, I have a couple of rubber rust erasers that work very well.
 

SpikeC

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:tease:Just chuck a wire brush in your drill and have at it! Or you could have it sandblasted.
 

rahimlee54

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Mother's Aluminium polish works for light surface rust, I have done that a couple of times.
 

Eamon Burke

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Cut a daikon in half, then mince the bottom half until it is a paste. dry it in your dehydrator for 4 hours. mix with water and flour to make a paste, then use the top half of the daikon to swirl it around, clockwise if it's on the blade road, counter clockwise if it's on the ura. Rinse with mineral water and dry with the hair of a blond virgin.

Just kidding. I was amused by how many different ways there are to skin this cat. Just abrade it away! However is convenient. If it's near the spine, you can just encourage it and call it a Kuro-Uchi finish.:sofa:
 

EdipisReks

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heh. the Flitz allows you to remove the rust without taking off the patina of scratching the finish, if you're careful, which is why i like it.
 

tk59

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Cut a daikon in half, then mince the bottom half until it is a paste. dry it in your dehydrator for 4 hours. mix with water and flour to make a paste, then use the top half of the daikon to swirl it around, clockwise if it's on the blade road, counter clockwise if it's on the ura. Rinse with mineral water and dry with the hair of a blond virgin.

Just kidding. I was amused by how many different ways there are to skin this cat. Just abrade it away! However is convenient. If it's near the spine, you can just encourage it and call it a Kuro-Uchi finish.:sofa:
You had me going there for a sec, lol! :rofl2:
 
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