Replace my Sharp Pebble & CWINDY Stones?

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by dan, Jan 4, 2019.

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  1. Jan 4, 2019 #1

    dan

    dan

    dan

    Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2018
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    Location:
    Seattle, USA
    LOCATION
    What country are you in?
    USA

    STONE TYPE
    What type of stone are you interested in:
    Synthetic or Natural?
    Synthetic

    Splash and go or soaker?
    No strong preference, but I would probably not be able to easily store wet stones.

    What grit range are you looking for?
    TBD. Full range?

    What stone are you replacing if any?
    My current stones are cheapo combo stones purchased from Amazon. Sharp Pebble 400-1000 and CWINDY 3000-8000.

    What stones do you currently use in your lineup?
    Above two are my only stones.

    What is your absolute maximum budget for your stone?
    Around 200-250 or less. I am new and not afraid to buy new stuff in the future as my ability improves and knives change.

    STONE USE
    Do you primarily intend to use this knife at home or a professional environment?
    Home

    What type of knives will you be sharpening? (Traditional Japanese: yanagi, usuba, deba or Western style gyuto, petty etc)
    Blue steel Nakiri (B2 maybe?)
    Toyama 240 gyuto (first big purchase!)

    What type of steel will you be sharpening?
    Both Blue 2 for now but will likely add some stainless in the future too.

    STONE MAINTENANCE
    Do you use or have a flattening plate (Yes or no.)
    No

    If not, are you interested in learning how to flatten your stone? (Yes or no.)
    Potentially. What are the advantages of flattening?


    SPECIAL REQUESTS/COMMENTS
    Hello all. I'm new posting but I've been reading a lot the last couple months. I selected my current stones because they were highly rated on Amazon, which I suppose isn't the best choice as I'm getting into J-knives. What makes the Amazon stones different/worse than the stones commonly suggested here (King, Sharpton, Atoma, Gesshin, etc)? Also, how does my knife collection affect the stone choice? For example, does stainless typically use a lower grit numbers or a higher hardness abrasive?
     
  2. Jan 4, 2019 #2

    childermass

    childermass

    childermass

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    With your budget you could buy a Gesshin stone set from JKI and add a #150 diamond flattening plate as well.

    I’m in Europe and thus have no experience with these stones, but they get good vibes here all the time.
    The flattening plate is mandatory as the stones will dish over time and you will have problems with your sharpening angle when that happens.
     
  3. Jan 4, 2019 #3

    milkbaby

    milkbaby

    milkbaby

    Well-Known Doofus Supporting Member

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    I don't know anything about those stones you already have, but I would agree that getting a flattener is priority. I would figure a way to flatten stones before buying new ones.

    Getting your knives sharp is simply removing metal from both sides until they meet at a consistent and keen edge. That requires a steady angle of approach between the knife and the stone. If your stone is not flat, then that angle is always changing and making it difficult to achieve the desired goal.
     
  4. Jan 5, 2019 #4

    dan

    dan

    dan

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    It seems to me like a more important upgrade might be the flattening plate. I've been using this small flattening block (maybe 2" x 2") which came with the stones I linked before most uses, and it seems to work okay. Is there an advantage for the larger flattening plates? Many of the flattening plates seem bigger and on par with the size of flattening stones.

    I have had some success with my current stones already, and don't mind using them if there isn't any serious advantages to more expensive stones/sets. Perhaps they make they sharpen faster or more consistently? I do wonder what the difference, in practice and in theory, is between different stones.

    I do agree to your point, milkbaby, that practicing technique could be more important for me. I'm learning every time I try.
     
  5. Jan 5, 2019 #5

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

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    start with a good 1k and a good 3-5 k finisher and a plate.
    skip the 400 and 8000 upgrade, you have some version of those already.

    if youre happy with the 1k, especially on simple carbon you don't need amazing stones,
    but a decent 1k standalone is $50-65 if you feel the need to upgrade.

    for ~100 you can get gesshin syn nat, cho 3k, shapton gs 3 or 4k, etc a bit less
    and for ~50 you can get a nice Rika 5k if you want to pay only half the more expensive ones...

    Atoma diamond plates in 400 or 140 are $65-75

    the advantages of better stones are speed (especially on stainless or PM),
    ease of setup/breakdown and the "feedback" sometimes makes using them better experience,

    alot of that is eye of the beholder dependin on budget and
    personal style and living arrangements/work/ etc

    [IMHO -- With new knives and a decent 1k already, the best money spend is probably
    a good stone like a cho3k that will do touch-ups as well as finish...
    and keep you off the 1k for a bit longer anyway...]
     
  6. Jan 13, 2019 #6

    vicv

    vicv

    vicv

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    That sharp pebble is a good stone. The 1k side is roughly 500 FEMA grit. A bit finer than a crystolon fine and leaves things really sharp. That's generally the finest I go. No need for more unless you're trying to impress someone with something Shiney . I do that sometimes too!
     
  7. Jan 13, 2019 #7

    dan

    dan

    dan

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    What does the acronym FEMA mean?

    If this stone is sufficient, I will probably keep them (for now) and get some other things like a finishing stone, stone holder and/or sink bridge. Thanks for the input everyone!

    Edit: And a flattening plate!
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2019
  8. Jan 14, 2019 #8

    vicv

    vicv

    vicv

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    Fepa sorry. Basically the sandpaper grit rating. European I believe. So it's about 500 silicon carbide sandpaper
     
  9. Jan 14, 2019 #9

    Nemo

    Nemo

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    There are actually two FEPA scales. FEPA-P is for sandpaper. FEPA-F is for bonded abrasives. They are pretty similar in the coarse grits (FEPA-F is a little coarser in the very coarse grits IIRC). FEPA-F is finer than FEPA-P in the fine grits and finer again in the very fine grits.
     
  10. Jan 14, 2019 #10

    vicv

    vicv

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    True the whole system can get confusing sometimes. The stone is also 14 micron by their documentation. The thing I like about it is it's all Sic. So it will cut any steel and any carbide. Not so much a big deal in kitchen knives but for overall use. And there are some m4 chef knives out there
     
  11. Jan 14, 2019 #11

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

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    14 micron should be around 1k JIS if not mistaken...
     
  12. Jan 14, 2019 #12

    vicv

    vicv

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    Correct.
     
  13. Jan 14, 2019 #13

    vicv

    vicv

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    But there is more to stone finish than just grit rating or micron. The type of abrasive, the toughness of abrasive, substrate, and binder all play a large roll. A fine India may be rated 400 grit but leaves a finish quite a bit higher. Naniwa ss leaves a very high polish for its rating. The sharp pebble is a Sic stone and quite friable so it'll leave a coarser(slightly) edge than a fine India. There's no Japanese stone I can think of to compare it to. Maybe a King 800. But it will cut faster.
     

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