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Reverse hollow grind?

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Mike Davis

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I am curious, and i am hoping that some of the everyday knife users will chime in. I was thinking that if the partial flat grind was on the edge of the holy grail, why not drop the flats behind the grind in some. With a slight(48") concave, would this help with food sticking without sacrificing strength behind the grind? This is just a thought and am in no way trying to "reinvent" anything, just trying to save some headache in the long run.



Thanks
Mike
 

jmforge

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Mike, did you see my post about the "blended" shallow hollow grind?
 

Eamon Burke

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I have no idea how that would work. Honestly. All I could add is conjecture, but that's definitely on the list of "try it and see" ideas.
 

l r harner

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nope not new

there are a few that lightly hollow a full flat or even a flat that was convexed int the edge
 

Mike Davis

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I am just wondering if it would help prevent food sticking and not sacrifice strength. I am going to try it on a piece i am making for myself to test...I plan on testing several designs before i try to sell any knives to anyone. I just want to test the waters so to speak, so i am not chasing my tail.
 

tk59

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This should work fine but the effect will be marginal compared to flat except for realy thin slices, maybe...
 

SpikeC

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This is how Takeda forges his blades. It works quite nicely.
 

echerub

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I was just about to comment about Takeda's knives (at least his gyutos, dunno about the other types) using this approach. Works well for me.
 

Marko Tsourkan

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There are a few other Japanese makers (and Carter) whose knives feature a similar grind, but it is a mostly a by-product of grinding on 3' (or so) water wheel grinders or forging a blade to shape.
 

jmforge

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Of course, the question is whether after all of these centuries, the grind is still merely a by-product? :wink:
There are a few other Japanese makers (and Carter) whose knives feature a similar grind, but it is a mostly a by-product of grinding on 3' (or so) water wheel grinders or forging a blade to shape.
 

Mike Davis

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Mine would be forged to shape. I plan on forging everything as close to shape as possible. Thought about making a jig to do this, like a fullering tool...exactly Daniel.
 

jmforge

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Anything that you forge in will eventually have to be ground out. On stuff this thin, I would think seriously about scraping or grinding.
Mine would be forged to shape. I plan on forging everything as close to shape as possible. Thought about making a jig to do this, like a fullering tool...exactly Daniel.
 

SpikeC

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Just curious, jm, have you handled a Takeda? They are forged to shape and only the edge is ground.
 

jmforge

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No, I haven't. Is the rest of the blade left in its "as forged" state? Don't the Japanese smiths also "finish forge" their blades cold? That may work for them, but I am not going to hit a piece of cold blade steel with a power hammer if I can help it. Call me an old woman, but there it is.:)
Just curious, jm, have you handled a Takeda? They are forged to shape and only the edge is ground.
 
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