Salmon knife ridge....why?

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by Barry's Knives, Nov 8, 2019.

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  1. Nov 8, 2019 #1

    Barry's Knives

    Barry's Knives

    Barry's Knives

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    I saw this deba described as a salmon knife on the tsubaya website. It has a sort of.metal ridge at the top. Does anyone know what the purpose of this is? I can only guess it's for weight at the heel but am open to suggestions.... 112443025.jpg
     
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  2. Nov 8, 2019 #2

    Carl Kotte

    Carl Kotte

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    Interesting! Never seen that before.
     
  3. Nov 8, 2019 #3

    KenHash

    KenHash

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    I've never seen one like that. I wonder if it's just a personal preference of the Sakai smith, or there is some science
    behind it.
     
  4. Nov 8, 2019 #4

    Barry's Knives

    Barry's Knives

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    Quite tempted to pick one up to find out
     
  5. Nov 8, 2019 #5

    Carl Kotte

    Carl Kotte

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    Depending on how deep the ridge is one might think that this deba is lighter and thinner than many others. But as said: it depends
     
  6. Nov 8, 2019 #6
    On Watanabe's site he describes his sakekiri (salmon knife) as a "boat knife" - used by fishermen as a work knife. Perhaps it's just part of the aesthetics?

    Or from the pic it looks like it could facilitate a pinch grip.
     
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  7. Nov 8, 2019 #7

    RonB

    RonB

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    Bottle opener?? :p
     
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  8. Nov 8, 2019 #8

    Carl Kotte

    Carl Kotte

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    Almost every knife is a potential bottle opener.
     
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  9. Nov 8, 2019 #9

    Barry's Knives

    Barry's Knives

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    Does anyone know why salmon knives are wider and thinner than normal debas anyway?
     
  10. Nov 8, 2019 #10

    Dendrobatez

    Dendrobatez

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    So a hammer doesn't damage the spine? Every old deba I've bought from Japan looks like the spine was used as the hammer...
     
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  11. Nov 8, 2019 #11

    Barry's Knives

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    So people literally use a hammer on the spine to get through tough bone?
     
  12. Nov 8, 2019 #12

    SilverSwarfer

    SilverSwarfer

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    I use finesse. Salmon bones a rather easy to zip through.
    I always have the tail on my left, don’t flip the fish while I’m removing the spine: heel to tip for the top filet and tip to heel for the bottom. During the 2nd cut (tip to heel, the knife is at such an angle ~40deg that a “ramp” near the spine would be helpful when approaching the anal fin area. There’s a bit of cartilage and bone there that can snag your edge and stop a smooth cut.

    maybe it’s a shape feature near the spine to help spread the flesh from bone? I’ve never seen such a knife.
     
  13. Nov 8, 2019 #13

    minibatataman

    minibatataman

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    That's what the spine is for, it's the only way I open beers
     
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  14. Nov 8, 2019 #14

    M1k3

    M1k3

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    The description of it being a boat knife, makes me think the fishing boats have slots for knives and the bump would help protect the handle? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
     
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  15. Nov 9, 2019 #15

    stringer

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    This is extremely common with cleavers, both Chinese and Western. I have purchased many vintage ones over the years with significant mallet/hammer damage on the spine. I've also watched the guys behind the fish counters at Asian groceries do it to remove fish heads. I've never seen a deba like that but it wouldn't surprise me.
     
  16. Nov 10, 2019 #16

    Dendrobatez

    Dendrobatez

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  17. Nov 10, 2019 #17

    Barry's Knives

    Barry's Knives

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    Cool, thanks for the info!
     

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