Sandpaper

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by madelinez, Jan 15, 2019.

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums by donating:

  1. Jan 15, 2019 #1

    madelinez

    madelinez

    madelinez

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2018
    Messages:
    90
    I want to buy some sandpaper for thinning as well as removing some deeper vertical scratches on one of my knives. I've heard that depending on the type you can do it wet or dry. Can anyone give me some advice what works best for thinning and taking out scratches, what grit should I use etc.

    Once I thin and remove the scratches I have some fingerstones for finer work.
     
  2. Jan 15, 2019 #2

    Bert2368

    Bert2368

    Bert2368

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2018
    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Hellish frozen Northern wasteland, aka MN
    20190115_011048.jpg

    If you go to an average USA hardware store, you will find the dark grey "wet or dry" sandpaper in grits as fine as at least 400 usually, sometimes as fine as 1,000.

    For thinning, start coarse. Mount it on something DEAD FLAT.

    The same hardware stores should be able to provide you with a pre cut piece of window glass to adhere the sandpaper to. This is how I sharpened woodworking tools for many years, until I had the budget to buy fancy artificial and natural rocks.

    Commonly, window glass is made by pouring molten glass onto a bath of melted Tin or a similar liquid metal. It is leveled by gravity, they call this "float plate" glass, to differentiate it from "ground plate" glass. The ground stuff is EXPENSIVE. The float glass is plenty flat enough for use in sharpening, flattening and thinning.

    I suggest you use one of the 3M spray on art mounting adhesives to afix the paper to the glass, get one that says it can be released. Spray the glass AND the back of the paper, then LET THEM DRY UNTIL JUST TACKY. Carefull press the paper onto the adhesive on the glass, it will stick. And it will UNSTICK in a single piece when you want to replace it.

    Use it wet, after adhereing, it should stay flat enough. It is a nightmare to use wet without adhering the backside to a flat surface, curling towards the abrasive side and generally being contrary.

    Sandpaper, glass and something to serve as a strop (even newspaper, an old belt, lots of possibilities!) will be enough to get a useable edge on knives and chisels, plane blades, whatever...

    If you want finer paper than the hardware store has, call a local garage that repairs and paints cars after collisions, a good paint & painter's tool store or the businesses that supply AUTO BODY SHOPS with consumables and tools. The guys doing bodywork metal repairs and automobile paint touch ups/detailing have access to much finer grades of the wet/dry paper than ordinary hardware or home stores carry.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
  3. Jan 15, 2019 #3

    RDalman

    RDalman

    RDalman

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2015
    Messages:
    1,169
    Rhynowet redline, wet. Have fun.
     
    Xenif likes this.
  4. Jan 15, 2019 #4

    Bolek

    Bolek

    Bolek

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2014
    Messages:
    186
    The sandpaper will became finer and lose its bite as it wear. The harder the better. Si carbide is very good one, the Al oxide is ok. Si oxide were very fast. Diamond are too expensive for me.
     
  5. Jan 15, 2019 #5

    milkbaby

    milkbaby

    milkbaby

    Well-Known Doofus Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,504
    Location:
    Sunny Florida
    If you are in the United States, you can find up to 400 grit sandpaper at the home improvement stores. Higher grits are more likely to be found at the automotive parts stores.

    If you're going to mail order, then I agree with Robin on Rhynowet Redline sandpaper. In my experience it loads up slower than 3M and will last longer.
     
  6. Jan 15, 2019 #6

    Luftmensch

    Luftmensch

    Luftmensch

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2017
    Messages:
    121
    If you want local convenience... go to Bunnings (some stores carry more stock than others). In the larger stores you will find wet & dry Flexovit sandpaper. From memory (don't quote me)... You should be able to find paper backed sheets from around 180 up to 1200. Or rolls of 400, 600 and 1200. You can also find fabric backed sheets for low grits (e.g. 80 up to 240). Be careful with the fabric backed low grit sheets (or avoid them all together!). They are aggressive and removing the scratch marks they leave can be labour intensive.

    I use these sheets with water to slow down the rate at which they clog up. Sorry if you know what you are doing... but if this is new to you.... don't fall into the trap of overworking the paper. It will cut aggressively for the first 30 seconds and probably be spent 5-10 minutes later (on hard steel). Paper is far cheaper than your time (i assume :p). Once the paper stops cutting, refresh the sheet. Like @Bolek said, you can use the effect to achieve a finer polish at the higher grits. Using a blunt 1200 grit leaves a pretty decent finish - I reckon its at about 2000-3000 on Naniwa's Chosera grit range.

    I have no idea how Flexovit compares to other brands but it does the job (convenience wins).
     
    madelinez likes this.
  7. Jan 15, 2019 #7

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,749
    walmart has precut packs for ~$5 of 3m auto wet dry sets 400 up to 2k or something
     
  8. Jan 16, 2019 #8

    Ruso

    Ruso

    Ruso

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,331
    I always wanted to know why wet/dry sandpaper is recommended. What is the difference compared to the usual sandpaper found in the hardware store.
     
  9. Jan 16, 2019 #9

    Dendrobatez

    Dendrobatez

    Dendrobatez

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2018
    Messages:
    57
    On Amazon you can get bundles of sandpaper that range from 300g-3000g. The lower ones are garbage but 600 and over are great. If you need a good low grit one, cubitron II 220g is long lasting with a consistent grit size. For thinning I'll usually clamp the blade to a board and wrap the sandpaper around a brass bar.
     
    madelinez likes this.
  10. Jan 16, 2019 #10

    dough

    dough

    dough

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2011
    Messages:
    351
    I will third rhynowet redline
    Also I go lower then 400 and getting an even finish at 600-800 can be rather smooth/shiny
    Either way getting a good/great finish hand sanding is a labor of love.
     

Share This Page