Shapton ceramic vs glass stones?

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

10160

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2021
Messages
91
Reaction score
9
Location
USA
I was recommended to get a 3000 grit whetstone to touch up my sg-2 and vg-10 knives. However Shapton only makes 3000 grit on their glass stones and not the ceramic/pro line. They do have their ceramic stones in the 5000 grit. should i just go with that one? Another option is a King stone at 4000 grit. TIA
 

M1k3

¯\_(ツ)_/¯-known member
Joined
Jul 28, 2018
Messages
6,312
Reaction score
9,044
For roughly that grit I'd get either Glass 4k (best edge in my opinion), Glass 3k (compromise between the other options) or Pro 2k (has the best feel in my opinion of them).
 

10160

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2021
Messages
91
Reaction score
9
Location
USA
For roughly that grit I'd get either Glass 4k (best edge in my opinion), Glass 3k (compromise between the other options) or Pro 2k (has the best feel in my opinion of them).
what about 5000 grit?
 

10160

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2021
Messages
91
Reaction score
9
Location
USA
Useable, but, the other options I recommend would be better suited to those steels.
are 3000 and 4000 about the same? keeping in mind i still need a bite to my j knives, but as polished as i can get.
 

Boynutman

Supporting Member
Joined
May 31, 2014
Messages
259
Reaction score
228
Location
Amsterdam
Hi @10160, if it were me, I would aim for the lower grits of that range (SG2000 or SP2000 for example). I found that higher grits are useful for carbon steels, less so for stainless.
I am not a sharpening god, but do have some experience now.
Buy a higher grit stone once you get into carbon steel knives. Then you can also use it on stainless.
It will save you a ton of shiny but ineffective edges on stainless (rubbing away on the high grit stone, not quite sure what I was doing, until the edge was polished and utterly useless).
 

10160

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2021
Messages
91
Reaction score
9
Location
USA
Hi @10160, if it were me, I would aim for the lower grits of that range (SG2000 or SP2000 for example). I found that higher grits are useful for carbon steels, less so for stainless.
I am not a sharpening god, but do have some experience now.
Buy a higher grit stone once you get into carbon steel knives. Then you can also use it on stainless.
It will save you a ton of shiny but ineffective edges on stainless (rubbing away on the high grit stone, not quite sure what I was doing, until the edge was polished and utterly useless).
so 2000 grit and not 3000? I assumed id get at least a 3000 since i already have a 1000 for basic sharpening and not refining/polishing.
 

Boynutman

Supporting Member
Joined
May 31, 2014
Messages
259
Reaction score
228
Location
Amsterdam
That would be my bet.
My experience is on a Naniwa super stone 2000&5000 combi (not a big fan). Haven't tried the suggestions above so they may behave somewhat different.
 

LostHighway

Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
910
Reaction score
978
Location
Minnesota
Don't get too attached to numerical grit ratings, they differ from manufacturer to manufacturer and sometimes even within manufacturer lines. As has been previously noted the SP1000 is coarse for a nominally 1k stone. The SP2000 is close to a "true" 2k, if anything perhaps a touch finer so it is a reasonable step from the SP1000. I can't really speak to the Naniwa stones as the NP/Chosera 800 (actually finer in practice than the SP1000) is the only one I own. For touch ups I like the advice @M1k3 has given you, the SG4000 is a very good stone, but the SP2000 could serve in that capacity as well.

 
Last edited:

Grayswandir

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2021
Messages
265
Reaction score
165
Location
East Coast
You could go for a Shapton Kuromaku 2K stone, they're very nice. They're inexpensive as well, if you buy on Amazon (roughly $40).
 

tcmx3

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2015
Messages
1,494
Reaction score
1,767
glass 4000.

there are other good options but most of those cost an amount that will get you a coarser/softer tomae and Id rather have that than any of these synthetics but YMMV (e.g. Naniwa 3k).

also listen to LostHighway here; you need to evaluate the stone not the number on the box.
 

daveb

Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderators
Joined
Mar 12, 2012
Messages
13,094
Reaction score
5,629
what about 5000 grit?
SP5000 is the only Shapton I could not find a use for - didn't like it for cheap knives, Shun or Shun Lite knives, good stainless or good carbon knives.


Concur with others SP2000 or SG4000 are good finishers.
 

Delat

Dazed & Confused
Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2020
Messages
572
Reaction score
969
Location
Phoenix
I use an SG4000 for my tougher stainless steels (R2 and VG10) and carbons. Works great, highly recommend.

My cheap stainless I don’t go past the SG1000.
 
Top