Shapton Pro 1000 vs 2000

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by ooeei, Jul 25, 2018.

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  1. Jul 25, 2018 #1

    ooeei

    ooeei

    ooeei

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    Greetings all!

    I currently have a Shapton Kuromaku 320, and an Imanishi 1k/6k combo stone. I'm interested in going all splash n go, so would like to get a Shapton or two for use along with the 320.

    Typical recommendation seems to be 320/1000/5000, but I'm wondering if anyone has just gone from 320 straight to 2000 without issue. It's rare I have to use the 320 now, but for chips I sometimes do bust it out.

    Supposedly the 2000 leaves a pretty good edge for kitchen knives (and a lot of people seem to like it), so I'm tempted to try going with just the 320 and 2000 for awhile, adding a higher grit 5k or 8k if I end up wanting it down the line. Does this sound reasonable? From what I've ready the 1000 is relatively coarse for a 1000 stone, and isn't a great edge on its own without further refinement.

    Anyway, I know this isn't a very focused question, I'm just hoping for some feedback from people who have experience with the 2000, in particular if they have issues using it straight after the 320, or as the final step in their progression.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2018
  2. Jul 25, 2018 #2

    labor of love

    labor of love

    labor of love

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    I own both and rarely use the 2k. With the shapton Pro 1k I can comfortably jump to 4-6k no problem. I don’t have any soft iron clad knives at the moment but I believe that’s the advantage of the 2k over the 1k(it’s a decent pre polisher for blade road). 2k will sharpen up edges just fine too, but the 1k is really fast as hell so I much prefer it. Someone else will likely chime in with more experience with the 2k than me, but personally I heavily favor the 1k if we’re just talking about sharpening the edge.
     
  3. Jul 26, 2018 #3

    masibu

    masibu

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    I own the 320, 1k and 5k and have thought about the 2k myself for other reasons but i would think that might be a stretch if youre concerned about the finish at all. If not I guess you'd want to be on top of your deburring game on the 320. When i used mine I went with either my cerax 700 or shapton 1k as I dont really like spending time on the coarser stones if I can avoid it.

    If you're thinking about the 5k as well its a very different stone. Very hard and glass-like. I found a very brief soak or nagura to be necessary to enjoy the feel of it at all however the edge was decent enough, if a little toothy. Passable for a gyuto and pretty good for a carbon suji. I did notice the last time I used it that it didnt have the same initial glass-like feel so im not sure if maybe there's some kind of 'crust' on them or im just tripping balls.. either scenario is likely tbh
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2018
  4. Aug 1, 2018 #4

    nopomo

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    My favorite quick progression is from the King Deluxe 300 to the Shapton 2000. I don't know how the scratch pattern of the Shapton 320 compares to the King, but you should be fine. The 2k has no trouble cleaning up the edge as long as I stop as soon as I reach the apex on the King (before a burr forms). The edge off of the 2k doesn't improve drastically on 4-8k stones, as I can push cut paper and cut arm hair above the skin with the 2k edge.
     
  5. Aug 1, 2018 #5

    galvaude

    galvaude

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    Got the SP2k recently and used it on some kitchen knives (both carbon and SS) and IMO it is one of the most balanced and appropriate finish for kitchen task. The progression is usually 220 (if necessary), Glass 500 and SP2k. Love it.
     
  6. Aug 1, 2018 #6

    PalmRoyale

    PalmRoyale

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    Imo the 1000 is the star of the line up. It just works so nice on white and stainless steel and it's fast as hell. My usual progression is the SP1000 (or Atoma 1200) followed by my aoto.
     
  7. Aug 2, 2018 #7

    kkat

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    I own the entire shapton kuromaku line, and have had surprisingly good results from the 320-->2k(-->12k) progression. As Masibu noted, you'll want to bring your a game to deburring on the 320.

    Fun fact, the 320->2k->12k progression is a Shapton recommendation. As you may have noticed, the Japanese kuromakus come with a little flyer with progression recommendations based on knife type. Here's a link to the original (text is in Japanese). I put red boxes around the "gyuto, sujibiki, honesuki" and "petty knife" categories. Their respective progressions are 220-->1.5k-->12k and 320-->2k-->12k. I haven't noticed a significant difference between the edges produced on 220/1.5k/12k and 320/2k/12k progressions, but prefer the 320/2k/12k progression because the 320 is easier to deburr.
     
  8. Aug 2, 2018 #8

    PalmRoyale

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    How different is the 2000 from the 1000? I've played with the 5000 for a while and that thing is completely dead. Stupendously hard and no feedback whatsoever. Is the 2000 like that or more like the 1000 which has very nice feedback.
     
  9. Aug 2, 2018 #9

    Jville

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    I only used the 2k once, but I seem to remember having better feedback closer to the 1k. The 5k is a good stone, but yeah it's pretty lifeless with feedback. I sold it, but found it helped if I used a mini diamond plate for a bit to get some mud going.
     
  10. Aug 2, 2018 #10

    PalmRoyale

    PalmRoyale

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    I tried the 5000 with a diamond plate but it hardly released any mud. It did get a bit better with a Naniwa 5000 nagura.
     
  11. Aug 2, 2018 #11

    Jville

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    I also would use higher than 5k natural tomos on it.
     
  12. Aug 3, 2018 #12

    Xenif

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    The 2k is fairly hard, also works better with a few passes with diamond plate. Guess the SPs are not known to have great feedback, but they are relatively fast and anti dish. I like the 2k as the finishing stone for stainless (specifcally G3). SP2k also works really well for me for wide bevel blade road before it hits jnats
     
  13. Aug 3, 2018 #13

    Keith Sinclair

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    SP make good touch up stones on the job. The 2K not a feedback type stone but it will refresh your edge, just needs a splash of water, hardly dishes at all after much use, portable, and can use the plastic base as a holder. Also smaller stone that takes little storage space.
     
  14. Aug 4, 2018 #14

    nakneker

    nakneker

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    Between the two, I own them both, the SP 1000 is the better stone IMO. It’s a fast cutter, little load up, good feedback. The only stone in the SP line up I’m not real fond of is the 5k, but it has plenty of fans too.
     
  15. Aug 7, 2018 #15

    ooeei

    ooeei

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    Thanks for the feedback everyone. It seems a few people have had good results going straight from 320-2k, so I'll probably pick up a 2k one of these days and see how it goes. I'm not all that concerned with feedback or finish, I just want a quick/minimalist way to make my knives sharper, and it seems like the 2k is a good choice.

    My knives are stainless, and I'm not trying to win any sharpening contests, so I suspect the 2k will be just fine. If it cuts tomatoes and onions easily, it's good enough for me. We use (semi-soft) plastic cutting boards, so any sort of crazy sharp edge isn't going to last a really long time anyway.

    If I find it significantly duller than I like, maybe I'll pick up a 5-8k as well.

    I'm still holding off for a bit as we are likely moving soon, so buying more stuff doesn't make much sense at the moment. If anyone has any additional info/experience I'd welcome it!
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2018
  16. Aug 7, 2018 #16

    catalystman80

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    Can’t disagree with anyone here. One thing to note here is Shapton 1000 rating is a bit misleading as it finishes rougher than that of say Naniwa professional. And you can certainly go from Shapton pro 1k to 5k no problem. But I actually prefer the 2k finish on my kitchen knives, and use it also for in between maintenance sessions. So if your budget is limited, I’d say go with 1k and 5k to start, but 2k will be a good addition in the future. Between the 3, it also has the best feedback (though most would say the Shapton pro line in general have poor feedback, so I’m saying of the line, it has one of the better feedbacks).
     
  17. Aug 7, 2018 #17

    ooeei

    ooeei

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    I don't see much reason behind having both the 1k and 2k, why would you want both? Keep in mind I already have a 320 for coarse repair/thinning.

    It is good to hear you also like the 2k finish for your kitchen knives, that seems to be a common theme.
     
  18. Aug 7, 2018 #18

    catalystman80

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    You don’t, and that’s why I recommended 1k initially (along with 5k if you’d like) as the starting point.

    But you may not always want to or have the time for a progression through multiple stones. So for maintenance between more lengthy progressions, 2k alone does a great job.

    It comes down to having flexibility provided by having both. Of course some people are against this type of maintenance (citing fatigued edges, etc), so it is also a matter of personal taste.

    Another option is 1k to 2k: I actually don’t think 1k to 2k isn’t that high of a jump either considering 1k finishes rougher (for lack of better expression) than its rating (more so than 2k I think)
     
  19. Jan 3, 2019 #19

    Drayquan

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    Hey, just curious about anyone else’s experience going from shapton kuromaku 320 straight to the 2k, skipping 1k, anyone have luck with this 2 step progression?
     
  20. Jan 8, 2019 #20

    crlums

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    I use a progression from a King 300 to the shapton 2K and am very happy with my results. Often I stop there and dont bother finishing on a higher grit. I have not tried the 1k though so I cant compare them directly.
     
  21. Jan 8, 2019 #21

    Ruso

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    That should not be an issue. As long as the final edge suits your needs, heck, you can even go straight to 6K after 320
     
  22. Jan 9, 2019 #22

    Evan Estern

    Evan Estern

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    For a long time I just used the Shapton Pro 1K and then a leather strop. Makes a very good working edge, fast IMO. Then I added in a SP 5K and now I use that after the 1k. It gets a little sharper and I also find the edge lasts longer before I have to go back to the stones. I spend a couple of minutes stropping my blades after every shift, th0ugh.
     

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