Shapton Pro 1k

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HumbleHomeCook

Embrace your knifesculinity.
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@HumbleHomeCook maybe average micron seeing as the abrasives are not always homogenous? Curious if more homogenous = tighter scratch pattern and less contrast (dependent on hardness of abrasive)? Thinking about those SG vs. SP patterns!

I would think that the more uniform the particle size, the more uniform the scratch pattern would be. But you might also need that spread for efficient cutting and surface refreshment.

Abrasives are actually a pretty involved discipline.
 

cotedupy

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I’m glad you got to like the SP1500.


Soon as you said you were a fan I knew it was gonna be worth a second look. :)

Home use I’d still take the Cerax, for the feels. But stuff like this afternoon - I was putting final edges on 25 or so knives back to back, and the almost complete lack of dishing was a godsend. The muddier, messier Cerax would’ve been pretty annoying for this lot.

E67B2D8D-BD48-4ADF-8F2F-4F6021D34770.jpeg



And even though the Shapton surface does glaze to a certain extent after a while, it actually keeps cutting quite well, just not quite as fast. It doesn’t glaze or load to a point where it just stops working (cough... Naniwa Superstones... cough).
 
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Soon as you said you were a fan I knew it was gonna be worth a second look. :)

Home use I’d still take the Cerax, for the feels. But stuff like this afternoon - I was putting final edges on 25 or so knives back to back, and the almost complete lack of dishing was a godsend. The muddier, messier Cerax would’ve been pretty annoying for this lot.

View attachment 234008


And even though the Shapton surface does glaze to a certain extent after a while, it actually keeps cutting quite well, just not quite as fast. It doesn’t glaze or load to a point where it just stops working (cough... Naniwa Superstones... cough).
You just need to keep your green scotch Brite nagura handy.
 

The_Real_Self

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All stones should be rated in micron. Grits are too varied and subjective.

Yes, indeed. Hap Stanley has long argued this needs to happen. When you are saying X micron, you are referring to a particle size. When you say X grit, what you are actually referring to is a grit 'range' which is much broader. I don't feel that the 'range' part is necessarily bad as I don't believe it's crucial to have all identical particles size but this eliminates the 'which grit scale' issue which plagues all stones.
 
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I notice he's using the BBW on the flat side of an usuba. I wonder if he uses the same stone on the other side?

I ask mostly because I just recently had to sharpen a couple of usubas for the very first time, and I've been using my normal stones on the bevel side (A BBW in one case, to finish), and a Shapton 30K on the flat side, because I want to deburr but take off as little metal as possible. So of course I am wondering whether the master's stone choices are asymmetrical too.
 

Steampunk

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Watching the Shigefusa family sharpen in Maksim's videos was the single best lesson in how to get a perfect Kasumi finish on wide/single bevel knives that I have ever gotten. Replicating their formula and progression of stones (Starting with Shaptons to level out the geometry, and then using the JNS synthetic Red Aoto, JNS 6K, decent J-Nat, and hand work with finger stones and powders.) just works.

I sorta recall that Maksim might have brought that natural Coti/BBW combo stone with him for Iizuka San to try, but could be wrong. Stones that special, in that size were just starting to evaporate when I first got into Belgian stones... Part of me is still kicking myself for not jumping on some of the things I used to see coming up for sale back then...

One of those videos from Maksim when he spent some time with Shigefusa, is where I got the idea to try my Shapton Pro 1K for thinning work. At the time I was reading about people using really muddy/soft coarse and medium grit stones, which didn't quite jive with my experience with these stones, which was that they seemed to hide holes in the grind, if not even dig them deeper, and erode the shinogi line. Then I tried using hard/non-muddy stones for the initial grinding work, after seeing that video, followed by the finer stones that could still create the contrast... Then it clicked.

Thanks for posting the screenshot, @Choppin . Brought back good memories, from when Dave Martell was still running the forum, Maksim Envoldson was a regular poster, and Salty was doing stuff like this:



;)
 

calostro5

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They gave me one of these today at work, which was nice :).

I’d not tried before, but f me is it good. Get much love here? (Perhaps it does, and I’d just ignored because the 1.5k is pretty pants...)

I’d go so far as to say it’s the best 1k sharpening stone I’ve used.

View attachment 232739
This is the first good sharpening stone I bought. I loved it from the beginning.
 
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