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Shigefusa stone Ohira Range suita

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maxim

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After i read Hides blog about Shigefusa stones.
http://hides-export.blogspot.com/2011/04/shigefusa-and-his-whetstones.html
I was very exited and asked my soars that sold that stone to Shigefusa to get one similar for me :hungry:



So i just got it today :jumpy:
It is Ohira Range suita mine is without toxic lines or inclusions and i can not feel any lines on it !
I just try it out on my kasumi Moritaka, that stone is amazing i am bit surprised that it is so hard i thought it was much more softer stone but its not , it is very very fast as you can see it is only black swarf on the stone without any slurry. Finish is like on Shigefusa knifes :D
Now i have a stone i can relate to when i peak some stones and finger-stones for Shigefusa knifes !!

Here is pics of my new stone :biggrin:















 

BertMor

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You mention that it has no occlusions or toxic lines...but it seems to have two very visible cracks. Please explain the difference so I can get a better handle on it. I am in the market for some stones and I am trying get a handle on sources and knowledge of the subject.

Oh nice purchase, if its good enough for Shigafusa then its good enough for anyone.
 

maxim

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You mention that it has no occlusions or toxic lines...but it seems to have two very visible cracks. Please explain the difference so I can get a better handle on it. I am in the market for some stones and I am trying get a handle on sources and knowledge of the subject.

Oh nice purchase, if its good enough for Shigafusa then its good enough for anyone.
It is not cracks but lines :) Sometimes stones have lines that include harder particles then stone it self or sand that can scratch the knife or feels bumpy when you sharpening it called toxic lines or inclusions you have to avoid them in the stone.

You can se on the picture Shigefusa stone that he had one big line that was toxic and he dig it out with some small inclusions too that looks like holes that was probably some sand in them.

Luckily i dont have it in my stone :)
 

BertMor

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It is not cracks but lines :) Sometimes stones have lines that include harder particles then stone it self or sand that can scratch the knife or feels bumpy when you sharpening it called toxic lines or inclusions you have to avoid them in the stone.

You can se on the picture Shigefusa stone that he had one big line that was toxic and he dig it out with some small inclusions too that looks like holes that was probably some sand in them.

Luckily i dont have it in my stone :)
Thanks for the explanation
 

stereo.pete

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How would one sharpen on a stone that has the same defects as Shigefusa's? Am I correct when I assume that when they use that stone they have to avoid the large diagonal valley as well as the craters on the top right of the stone? With that being said, it appears that Shigefusa can only use the lower left hand side of their stone. Is my assumption correct or am I way off base here? I really have no experience with natural stones including whether or not they need to be flattened like synthetics.
 

SpikeC

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I would think that one would simply ignore the groove and let the blade bridge any dips in the surface.
 

mainaman

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How would one sharpen on a stone that has the same defects as Shigefusa's? Am I correct when I assume that when they use that stone they have to avoid the large diagonal valley as well as the craters on the top right of the stone? With that being said, it appears that Shigefusa can only use the lower left hand side of their stone. Is my assumption correct or am I way off base here? I really have no experience with natural stones including whether or not they need to be flattened like synthetics.
may be they have rounded the groove edges a bit this way the knife does not feel them?
also for sharpening only you can really do it on a corner with some experience.
 

Darkhoek

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A very nice stone showing exeptional lotus through the whole of the stone. It also looks very powerful pulling swarf in clear water. That is a real gem, Max! Congratulations on that one. :)

DarkHOeK
 

maxim

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may be they have rounded the groove edges a bit this way the knife does not feel them?
also for sharpening only you can really do it on a corner with some experience.
I have one Okudu suita with same groove and it works very good, of coarse you can feel a bit that groove is there, but it dose not effect sharpening or finish
 

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