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daveb

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It's called a "Pullman" loaf pan. The top lid keeps the loaf from expanding up and forces a condensed loaf. Used for sandwich bread.

BTW the "USA Pan" line of pans is the best I've used. I don't make this kind of bread but have their muffin pans, reg loaf pans, not sure how many others.
 

lowercasebill

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It's called a "Pullman" loaf pan. The top lid keeps the loaf from expanding up and forces a condensed loaf. Used for sandwich bread.

BTW the "USA Pan" line of pans is the best I've used. I don't make this kind of bread but have their muffin pans, reg loaf pans, not sure how many others.
USA pan👍
 

lowercasebill

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There is a trough along the edge to collect the grease that runs down the domed grid the spout is for that grease to run off. There is a hole in the spout to hang a cup to collect the grease. The hanger rusted off. I still have to drill that out and attach a cup.
 

TB_London

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After swapping out my frying pans for some decent carbon steel, I started looking for something stainless for when carbon would be too reactive. After a bit of a hunt, and not wanting to pay new prices picked up a used mauviel 250c frying pan


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quick go over with some oven cleaner and a Brillo pad to get the burnt on grease off, then a quick buff with some autosol had it looking a bit tidier

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Will see how it performs tomorrow, seems nicely solid
 

Michi

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I did look at them, but ended up buying a smaller horizontal one. It has allowed me to discover I'm terrible at sausage-making.
Don't give up! It's a bit like sourdough: it takes a few tries to get the technique down.

Some tips:
  • Make sure everything is cold. Use an instant-read thermometer and keep the temperature below 15 ºC (ideally, below 12 ºC). If things get too warm, stick them back into the fridge or freezer for a while.
  • Soak natural casings for at least two hours in cold water. Four or five hours is better. The casings stay much more flexible that way and are less likely to break.
  • Don't over-stuff the casings. Let them slide off the horn by themselves and only apply some friction if they are really not full enough. An under-stuffed sausage doesn't look quite as pretty, but tastes just as good as a perfectly-stuffed one. An over-stuffed sausage, on the other hand, tends to stop being a sausage in short order.
  • Fill the casings slowly. No prizes for doing it quickly, and slowly-stuffed sausages taste just as good as quickly-stuffed ones.
  • Use a thick sowing needle, or a sausage pricker, or similar to get rid of air bubbles, so the casing is nice and snug against the meat. It looks better that way, and the sausages are less likely to burst when you fry them if there are no air pockets that will expand.
  • Larger caliber (30-34) hog casings are easier to deal with than thin sheep casings. Wait with the sheep casings until you get your technique down.
  • Most sausages need to dry out for several hours or overnight for the casing to become stronger. The sausage also will develop more flavour that way. Put them on a cake rack or similar and leave them uncovered in the fridge. The recipe should tell you what's appropriate for a particular sausage.
It's worth persisting. The sausage I make myself is way better than what I can buy at most butcher shops (other than really expensive stuff from artisan butchers). And I find it's a fun thing to do :)
 

juice

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Cool, thanks for that. I'm using collagen casings, but I've had a huge split rate, which my butcher says is prob caused by over stuffing them. Once we've moved I'll give it another crack. And I do have a sausage pricker - $6 from Amazon US, $36 here...
 

Michi

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I'm using collagen casings, but I've had a huge split rate, which my butcher says is prob caused by over stuffing them.
Have you considered using hog casings? I find that they not only look and taste better, but are also a lot more forgiving in terms of stretch.
 

Michi

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I have this on loan from a friend at the moment. Definitely worth a closer look. Written by two Australian butchers, it has a lot of info about farming and butchering practices, sustainable meat consumption, and how to use every part of the animal. Good reading!

The second half of the book has a lot of really nice recipes, including ones that use offal. I will probably buy a copy for myself just for that.
IMG_3910.jpg
 

sudsy9977

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Ok so thank god my wife doesn’t check our bank. Just spent 180 dollars at Chester basil’s. Let’s hope they’re nice. Mostly Xmas gifts. I did sneak in one or three lol for myself. Ryan
 

sudsy9977

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Ohh I gotta post some pictures finally too. Gonna break in my new Kamari joe on thanksgiving for the bird! Ryan
 

Chips

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After swapping out my frying pans for some decent carbon steel, I started looking for something stainless for when carbon would be too reactive. After a bit of a hunt, and not wanting to pay new prices picked up a used mauviel 250c frying pan


View attachment 100863View attachment 100864

quick go over with some oven cleaner and a Brillo pad to get the burnt on grease off, then a quick buff with some autosol had it looking a bit tidier

View attachment 100865
View attachment 100866
Will see how it performs tomorrow, seems nicely solid

I'm curious, how much of the pan is copper versus whatever the cooking surface is? I couldn't imagine silver or tin holding up to that sort of abrasion. They're beautiful pans, but i've never cooked on one.

Nice clean up on it!
 

rickbern

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I'm curious, how much of the pan is copper versus whatever the cooking surface is? I couldn't imagine silver or tin holding up to that sort of abrasion. They're beautiful pans, but i've never cooked on one.

Nice clean up on it!
I have a 250 sauté. I’ve read it’s 2.3mm copper and .2mm stainless

Plenty of copper mass in mine.
 
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