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labor of love

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Haha its just quite a coincidence both of you were responding to the same exact question that was asked of both of you simultaneously.
 

ian

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Kochis are usually readily available and inexpensive therefore we all overlook them.
Doesn’t stop us talking about Mazaki, but I suppose Kochis have also been around for a while and the initial blush has worn off.

Edit: I guess Mazaki also benefits from making a billion different versions of the same knife, so there’s more to talk about....
 

dwalker

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Glad to see it out in the wild. It’s a great knife.
Thanks Ian. I am happy with the purchase. This is one of those knives that "feels" quality when you pick it up. It takes a screaming edge.
 

MrHiggins

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I've owned 3 Kochis in V2. The first two I bought in 2017 and had very rough, course-grained KU. The newer one I bought had much smoother, fine-grain KU. I like the old version a lot more. I ended up selling them all, and I really miss my old 210. I might try buying it back...
 

labor of love

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kwk1

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Finally arrived from Sweden! What a beauty! Isasmedjan 240mm Gyuto. Can't wait to use it later.



Jonas's pictures are much better at capturing this than mine:

Nice and interesting in that the lines are mostly vertical.
 

Bert2368

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Thanks Labor, I should read more carefully. I will admit to a couple of rye on the rocks this evening.
It's the rocks. Very bad for the cognition.

It's safer to mix the rye with a little maple syrup, some lemon juice and a drop of bitters, shake it with crushed ice and while STRAINING THE EVIL, EVIL ROCKS OUT, pour it into a glass with a twist of lemon peel.

Much safer. I know these things.
 

dwalker

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It's the rocks. Very bad for the cognition.

It's safer to mix the rye with a little maple syrup, some lemon juice and a drop of bitters, shake it with crushed ice and while STRAINING THE EVIL, EVIL ROCKS OUT, pour it into a glass with a twist of lemon peel.

Much safer. I know these things.
I'll take that under consideration. [emoji12]
 

ian

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Some people say that the machi is a little gap between the neck of the knife and the ferrule, where the thinner tang is exposed. You can see this style on the Konosuke HD, for instance. Other times people seem to call that a "machi gap", and refer to the step between the neck and the thinner tang as the machi, as in "there's a gap between the machi and the ferrule". I understand that the Kochi "with machi" means that there's the same kind of step from the neck to the thinner tang, but in this case the blade is pushed in so that this step is flush with the ferrule, so you don't see it. As a result, the neck of the knife is the entire width of the ferrule, which is perhaps a little more comfortable. (That said, the Kochi without machi was super comfortable too...) Google "machi gap" for more information.

Edit: If anyone wants to give an authoritative answer as to which of the two things above "machi" really refers to, I'd be interested.
 
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StrawberryMeow

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Very futuristic looking!

Do you have a side shot with the blade on a board? It looks like the edge is almost ruler-straight.


Thank you!
I really like how it turned out.
The knife is almost flat with very little belly.
I specifically requested such a profile because I mostly chop veggies and use push/pull cut (no rocking).
It take much less effort to make sure I cut cleanly through everything, so I really like it.
 

StrawberryMeow

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Very unique. Hows handle comfort? Lots of sharp edges in that design.
Very very comfortable.
For one, the weight balance is so that when you hold the knife, the knife weight is towards the blade, helping you when you use the knife to chop.
For the sharp edges, there are really 3 areas that are of concern.
1.

The sharp point ends well before the choil so that your hands don't feel this point.

2.


This edge is sharp, but this is where your hand folds over like this:


So the sharp edge matches your hand ergonomically.

3.


The bottom edge of the triangle is actually very subtle. The photos make it look much sharper than it actually is.
So overall, I would say Don played with his handle quite a bit to make sure it is ultimately comfortable while looking spicy
 
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