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Alwayzbakin

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Just got a (relatively cheaper) mikawa nagura from a frames. I haven’t done much polishing and don’t really know what I’m doing so I just played around with different pressures/wetnesses. It’ll take me some more time to get an even finish but I’m really liking the results so far. Really rocked my socks when I used it for the edge; this will definitely become my new go to.
 

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Dominick Maone

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How are those King Ice Bears? Aren't they supposed to be a synthetic that acts like a Jnat?
Eh. I bought them because they are inexpensive and I read on this forum the 4K produces an outstanding edge. Now, I did only use the 4K once and the 6k once as a hybrid edge, so inconclusive for now. The 4K dished a little, but produced a nice edge. But I am used to using Shapton Pros and I have the Shapton Glass 4K that makes an outstanding edge. I bought them from woodcraft with a 10% off coupon. So they were 66 bucks for both of them shipped, that is a pretty good deal to try out two stones.
 

rocketman

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I hope you guys do not take this as an insult... Several months ago there was a posting on this site about a fellow in the Netherlands who had apparently spent most of his life researching sharpening stones. He published four pamphlets, which if read, go to the most extreme examination of stones I have ever seen or heard of.
Many of the stones were just various grades of sandstone... At a landscaping supply in my area I noticed that they had sandstone in all kinds of sizes and shapes, and more importantly in all kinds of grits.. Many cut on a saw with a good flat side..
On a lark, I bought one ($3), took it to the shop, and though what the hell, try it out on the home made (5160) machete... Enclosed picture of the result..
Pretty "toothy"..
Welcome to medieval times.
1101470255560084954.jpg
 

Pie

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New candidates for first and last step in the progression. I’ve read a lot of good things about SP120, eager to accidentally remove too much steel.
A6037B1E-8C80-40A5-8A3E-334F64A30B03.jpeg


Second stone is an old barber stone courtesy of @refcast, complete with leather and tobacco smell. Smooth, fine, and quick. Like quite fine.
 

friz

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I bought these from ProTooling the other day. Such a nice service as usual, and the friend who recommended he is awesome.
I am going to enjoy these with my polishing projects, alongside other synthetics I have already.

240562849_372240624364881_8310958549365447787_n.jpg
 

memorael

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Wow, so many new stones and sharpening toys. That KEN onion thingamajig, how tough is it? can you like shape a piece of steel into knife using just that? Might jump into the knife making thing if it in fact works.

I have been using and promoting the use of belgians for a longaaaaash while and up to this day I still don't fully understand a couple of things about them, one is the myth about the 4k 8k on the purple, blue or whatever vs the cream colored side. As I understand it, the garnets are far bigger than what the grit size polish they achieve is due to the shape of the garnets. Supposedly they form 135 degree edges and thus leave a very shallow groove or cut in the knife. If this is true, than how the heck does the blue side work differently? are the garnets bigger? wouldn't that make the cuts even shallower? do UFOS really exist? Anyone who can better explain or point me in the direction of a documented study on the behavior of coticules and BBW on steel I would greatly appreciate. Thanks.
 

memorael

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Shapton kuromaku 120 grit. I believe they’re also called shapton pro. Fastest (but also lowest grit) stone I’ve tried.

Most excellent thread btw, op.
seems like your knife has a low spot in the center. Pretty common.
 

stringer

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Wow, so many new stones and sharpening toys. That KEN onion thingamajig, how tough is it? can you like shape a piece of steel into knife using just that? Might jump into the knife making thing if it in fact works.

I have been using and promoting the use of belgians for a longaaaaash while and up to this day I still don't fully understand a couple of things about them, one is the myth about the 4k 8k on the purple, blue or whatever vs the cream colored side. As I understand it, the garnets are far bigger than what the grit size polish they achieve is due to the shape of the garnets. Supposedly they form 135 degree edges and thus leave a very shallow groove or cut in the knife. If this is true, than how the heck does the blue side work differently? are the garnets bigger? wouldn't that make the cuts even shallower? do UFOS really exist? Anyone who can better explain or point me in the direction of a documented study on the behavior of coticules and BBW on steel I would greatly appreciate. Thanks.

TLDR; The garnets in coticules are smaller and in a greater concentration than in Belgian blues. Both stones have the garnets suspended in a soft matrix of phyllosilicates. Raising a slurry makes the garnets more aggressive. Due to the size of the garnets and their concentration coticules are both generally faster and finish finer than blues. But a ton of this depends on your particular stone, slurry management, and sharpening technique.
 

memorael

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TLDR; The garnets in coticules are smaller and in a greater concentration than in Belgian blues. Both stones have the garnets suspended in a soft matrix of phyllosilicates. Raising a slurry makes the garnets more aggressive. Due to the size of the garnets and their concentration coticules are both generally faster and finish finer than blues. But a ton of this depends on your particular stone, slurry management, and sharpening technique.
I've read this before, i my mind I still have a hard time imagining what goes on. The higher concentration part makes sense, but then why... So it just occurred to me that when the stones formed the blue matrix basically was less capable at forming the garnets? or more capable hence the larger ones?
 

Barashka

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Some "seconds" strops .. not sure what's second about them, they look pretty great to me.
I already have two others, but wanted to try different stuff. From a really quick try, Balsa and Angus talk to me.
These are Balsa, Profiled Buffalo, Angus steer, Buffalo top, Cordovan bottom.

PXL_20210904_162439108.jpg
 

HumbleHomeCook

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Some "seconds" strops .. not sure what's second about them, they look pretty great to me.
I already have two others, but wanted to try different stuff. From a really quick try, Balsa and Angus talk to me.
These are Balsa, Profiled Buffalo, Angus steer, Buffalo top, Cordovan bottom.

View attachment 140932
Nice! Seconds from where?
 

Barashka

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Nice! Seconds from where?
Got it on one of the classifieds, angus steer was marked as used but the rest were 'seconds' (from someone who used to make strops). To be honest, leather isn't perfect, but I'd never expect leather to be absolutely perfect anyway, nor would it be shortly after I use it, it's more than enough for me to play with.
 

M1k3

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View attachment 141733

1 knife in and I’m all about the #diamondgang. Don’t think I’m going vitrified any time soon but man these are a game changer for me.
Aren't they? Getting super keen edges straight off the stone? The kind that make you think a strop probably isn't worth the hassle?
 

HumbleHomeCook

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Aren't they? Getting super keen edges straight off the stone? The kind that make you think a strop probably isn't worth the hassle?
There are a lot of folks out there, especially in the EDC/Sporting knife world who are "anti" strop because of appropriate stones and excellent technique.
 

Rangen

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There are a lot of folks out there, especially in the EDC/Sporting knife world who are "anti" strop because of appropriate stones and excellent technique.
If you can sharpen a stainless steel knife on stones, to the point where a strop cannot improve it by getting those persistent burrs completely out of the picture, my hat is off to you.

If you can do it with good carbon steel, well, so can I, sometimes. But more than half the time, the strop (and I'm talking here about basswood pasted with 8 micron diamond paste, or 4 micron for the good knives) still significantly improves the situation.

If you can use your excellent technique to hone a straight razor, and shave with it, and disdain that leather or cordovan strop that is hanging nearby, well, that's too many for me.
 

spaceconvoy

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If you can sharpen a stainless steel knife on stones, to the point where a strop cannot improve it by getting those persistent burrs completely out of the picture, my hat is off to you.
I don't think this is difficult with a decent stainless (ginsan) and more crucially, a natural finishing stone. I used to struggle with burrs on synthetic stones, but I think the slowness of naturals is a big advantage here. For burr reduction I use them relatively dry with very light pressure
 
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