Soup #5

Discussion in 'Whats Cooking? Food, Drink, & Gear' started by boomchakabowwow, Apr 17, 2019.

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  1. Apr 17, 2019 #1

    boomchakabowwow

    boomchakabowwow

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    haha. I was headed over to my butcher for some pork chops.

    The Lady at the front office is from the Philippines. And asked me to see if I could get her ingredients for “soup #5”. I was immediately curious and asked. “What do you need?”

    She hemmed and hawed in embarrassment.

    She is a shy modest lady. After some charades, I figured it out. She needs bull nuts!

    Soup #5 is a Philippine favorite. A soup made of bull testicles. Haha.

    My butcher has them!! $5.49 per pound. Kinda high in my mind for such an unpopular cut. :)

    I drew an elk tag this year. I’m bringing them back for her.

    Learned some thing of another culture yesterday.
     
  2. Apr 17, 2019 #2

    JustinP

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    Mmmmhhhhh elk nut soup.
     
  3. Apr 18, 2019 #3

    dough

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    What else goes in the soup?
     
  4. Apr 18, 2019 #4

    Nemo

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    I shudder to think what goes int soup #6
     
  5. Apr 18, 2019 #5

    idemhj

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  6. Apr 18, 2019 #6

    Michi

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    I've eaten bull testes a few times. (I've also eaten cow's udder, which tastes very similar.) Not a taste that's all that interesting. Very bland taste, and a very soft, spongy texture. Think of a firm version of brains, or something with a texture a little softer than tripe, and similarly bland in flavour.

    I guess there is a reason these bits are not commonly eaten: most people find the taste just too boring. There is also the reluctance of many people when it comes to offal, but that really is a cultural thing that varies depending on country. Bavaria, for example, has a long history of offal as part of the normal cuisine.
     
  7. Apr 18, 2019 #7

    idemhj

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    I can’t think of any European country where offal has not been a large part of the regular menu. I grew up eating heart, tounge, kidneys, liver, tripe etc., but these days offal is actually hard to get. Guess people are reluctant to eat it
     
  8. Apr 18, 2019 #8

    Michi

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    Which is a shame, because some of it can be mind-bendingly good. If you ever get to Bavaria, try ordering "Saure Lunge mit Knödel" (sour lung with bread dumpling). Most restaurants with traditional Bavarian cuisine will have it on the menu. It's amazing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2019
  9. Apr 18, 2019 #9

    idemhj

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    Thanks, will do.
    I was in Glasgow a while ago and had haggis for the first time, really liked it
    On the other hand, I’ve also had andouillette in France, and let me just say, it is not for the faint hearted
     
  10. Apr 18, 2019 #10

    changy915

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    No wonder the rocky mountain oysters at the local fair are so expensive.
     
  11. Apr 19, 2019 #11

    Michi

    Michi

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    Same here. Haggis can be truly nice!
    I've never had the chance to eat it, but it's on my bucket list :)
     
  12. Apr 19, 2019 #12

    MrHiggins

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    Haggis in Edinburgh, with Ittetsu 180 single bevel petty. Good stuff!

    20180830_075021.jpeg
     
  13. Apr 25, 2019 #13

    krx927

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    I was just eating bulls nuts over the weekend when I was visiting my home country. Not something that people eat a lot there but still everybody knows about it.

    I really like them just fried in oil like Wiener schnitzel. They are quite nice but they need to be fresh otherwise they develop some after taste. Taste wise you can really compare them with veal brains but they are much firmer. They remind me more of sweetbreads.

    In any case worth trying if you have a chance!
     
  14. Apr 25, 2019 #14

    JustinP

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    In my neck of the woods, we call them "Rocky Mountain Oysters". I've tried, them, and like you I find them boring flavor wise, and texture is not that great.
     

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