Starting at $179 Custom Honyaki Gyuto, 230mm

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bill_zeng

Knifemaker
KKF Sponsor
Joined
Feb 29, 2024
Messages
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Location
Canton
Hello everyone, today I bring you my new product for this month, a Honyaki Gyuto. It uses T10 steel, which is similar to White Paper #2 steel. I’ve made a comparison chart of the composition, which I’ll post as a picture. First, let’s go over the basic specifications of the knife:
  • 5mm spine
  • 50% 3mm
  • 75% 2.7mm
  • 10mm 1.2mm
  • 5mm 0.9mm
  • 51mm tall
  • Edge length: 230mm
  • Total length: 250mm
  • Tail: 115mm
  • Weight: 232g
  • HRC: 60
  • Oil quenched
  • T10 steel, similar to White Paper #2, but with slightly more CR, W, V, and MO
  • Default mirror-polished choil (as shown in the picture forgive my poor photography skills)
The knife in the picture is a custom order. The tail width is quite exaggerated, and most handles cannot fit it. Don't worry about this; the size can be adjusted for free.
Now, let me introduce the customization options. Firstly, there are two choices for the quenching line: one is 179USD another is 279usd . difference in the quenching area is as shown.

Shipping to most parts of the USA and Europe costs $15. In some regions, shipping may be slightly higher, but I will strive to keep shipping costs as low as possible.


Another customization option is the steel stamp. You can have your unique mark stamped in this area. Of course, very complex patterns might not be possible due to some physical limitations of the steel stamp.
This starts at $15. If you don't need a custom steel stamp, I will default to my own stamp, but you can also opt to have no stamp at all.
As for the surface finish, I can't offer a very high-end finish at this price range for the Honyaki Gyuto. I can only provide a basic 400-grit brushed or acid-etched finish(The last image). My acid-etching can only achieve this level of quality. However, there are many Honyaki polishing masters on KKF who can offer excellent polishing services.
Regarding the handle, I can only provide Bocote wood handles. You can also choose to have no handle, as there are many masters on KKF who can custom-make beautiful wa-handles for you.
Currently accepting pre-orders, with a lead time of about one month. It may be extended slightly but not by much.
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I love the look of that thick tang

Thank you very much. Since these knives are hand-forged, the thickness can vary greatly. Some customers even request a 7mm or 8mm tang. For Honyaki knives, I also prefer a thicker tang. Forging Honyaki blades to a greater thickness than regular gyuto knives makes it easier to control the blade balance.
 
Is there a particular reason you chose T10 instead of the more commonly used steels and quite a low HRC? I thought one of the advantages of honyaki is that you can push the HT to higher numbers. I imagine edge retention might not be one of the strong features. Just trying to understand some of the design decisions.
 
Bill, do you want us to pre-order directly with you or through your site?
I prefer purchasing through the website as it makes it easier for the bank to verify the legal source of my funds. I have already created two honyaki products on the website and have included a $15 base shipping fee.

https://zenforgedknife.com/
 
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Is there a particular reason you chose T10 instead of the more commonly used steels and quite a low HRC? I thought one of the advantages of honyaki is that you can push the HT to higher numbers. I imagine edge retention might not be one of the strong features. Just trying to understand some of the design decisions.
I have measured the data on some Japanese honyaki knives. Taking Mr. Yoshikazu Ikeda's works as an example, the measured samples were White #3 oil quenched and White #1 water quenched. The average hardness did not exceed 62 HRC. I have doubts about the actual hardness of some honyaki products that claim to reach 64 HRC. For me, T10 is a high-quality steel that is easily accessible. Compared to White #1, although it has slightly less carbon, the addition of Cr, W, V, Mo, Mn, and Ni means it doesn't need to be heat-treated to the hardness of White #1 to achieve the same or even better wear resistance while also having greater toughness.
For honyaki knives, I personally prefer using materials with slight alloy additions, such as 52100, T10, and T12A. They are more robust and wear-resistant than traditional Japanese White Paper Steel, while still providing a very similar cutting feel.
 
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I have measured the data on some Japanese honyaki knives. Taking Mr. Ikeda's works as an example, the measured samples were White #3 oil quenched and White #1 water quenched. The average hardness did not exceed 62 HRC. I have doubts about the actual hardness of some Honosho products that claim to reach 64 HRC. For me, T10 is a high-quality steel that is easily accessible. Compared to White #1, although it has slightly less carbon, the addition of Cr, W, V, Mo, Mn, and Ni means it doesn't need to be heat-treated to the hardness of White #1 to achieve the same or even better wear resistance while also having greater toughness.
For honyaki knives, I personally prefer using materials with slight alloy additions, such as 52100, T10, and T12A. They are more robust and wear-resistant than traditional Japanese White Paper Steel, while still providing a very similar cutting feel.
Just fyi, it's coming through as 'honosho' over here? Not sure if that's supposed to be honyaki but I suspect it is.
 
Just fyi, it's coming through as 'honosho' over here? Not sure if that's supposed to be honyaki but I suspect it is.
This was an issue with the ChatGPT translation. Thank you for pointing it out. I have fixed it.
 
I have measured the data on some Japanese honyaki knives. Taking Mr. Yoshikazu Ikeda's works as an example, the measured samples were White #3 oil quenched and White #1 water quenched. The average hardness did not exceed 62 HRC. I have doubts about the actual hardness of some honyaki products that claim to reach 64 HRC. For me, T10 is a high-quality steel that is easily accessible. Compared to White #1, although it has slightly less carbon, the addition of Cr, W, V, Mo, Mn, and Ni means it doesn't need to be heat-treated to the hardness of White #1 to achieve the same or even better wear resistance while also having greater toughness.
For honyaki knives, I personally prefer using materials with slight alloy additions, such as 52100, T10, and T12A. They are more robust and wear-resistant than traditional Japanese White Paper Steel, while still providing a very similar cutting feel.
If you want some more technical data, my togashi honyaki measured at 66-66.5hrc. Was glad to have some data on this as it feels like it is rare to get real hrc data on japanese knives. Thanks for the info about ikeda's knives. Makes sense, I hear they are tougher than usual and nice to sharpen.
 
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If you want some more technical data, my togashi honyaki measured at 66-66.5hrc. Was glad to have some data on this as it feels like it is rare to get real hrc data on japanese knives. Thanks for the info about ikeda's knives. Makes sense, I hear they are tougher than usual and nice to sharpen.
That's impressive hardness.
 
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