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Stropping vs sharpening rod.. material removal.

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HappyamateurDK

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Hi.

I recently got a leather strop ( mounted on a board ). And I’m getting pretty good results using it to maintain the edge like you would normally do with a ceramic rod. I use it with a green paste 0,3 microns/ 60.000 grits. And mostly with hard steel knives.

do people have any idea how much material stropping removes from the edge compared to a fine grit ceramic rod.. I would like to continue using the strop. But don’t wanna wear the knives unnecessary fast.

have a nice day 😊
 

applepieforbreakfast

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We'll, my ceramic Hand American rod is 1200 grit. My usual diamond charged strop is ~5000 grit.

So, I would say it depends on your compound. But usually significantly less material would be removed with a strop.
 

HappyamateurDK

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We'll, my ceramic Hand American rod is 1200 grit. My usual diamond charged strop is ~5000 grit.

So, I would say it depends on your compound. But usually significantly less material would be removed with a strop.
thanks for your reply.

the paste I use is 60.000 grit, so I assume it will wear very little. 😊
 

ref

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It will not be removing much material (well, you can check because the compound will turn grey) but the issue with 60,000/0.3micon paste is that you might find that your edge is too refined, especially if it's a kitchen knife and you intend to chop onions and tomatoes etc.
 

HappyamateurDK

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It will not be removing much material (well, you can check because the compound will turn grey) but the issue with 60,000/0.3micon paste is that you might find that your edge is too refined, especially if it's a kitchen knife and you intend to chop onions and tomatoes etc.
i did notice the edge was almost to clean/fine to cut trough tomatoskin. Other then that, I haven’t experienced problems. Onions is no problem either
 
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M1k3

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i did notice the edge was almost to clean/fine to cut trough tomatoskin. Other that I haven’t experienced problems. Onions is no problem either
Try using 1-2 passes per side when you use the strop.
 

M1k3

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I will try that. But will it be enough ? 🤔
Depends on how easily you can hit the edge at the right angle and how refined you like. You can always do more passes. Can't undo them without going back a step.
 

ref

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I will try that. But will it be enough ? 🤔
For kitchen knives, yes imo. For any strop with compound/abrasive on (paste, chromium or aluminum oxide), you will want a maximum of 2 or maybe 3 passes each side. I would not do any more. You can be a bit more aggressive on a harder surface like balsa, but if you have paste on leather, you do really risk over-polishing and over-convexing the edge (and this is coming from me; a big fan of stropping). There are some brilliant articles on Science of sharp.*

(also, remember to clean the knife well before use, because you don't wanna eat any diamonds!)

*also, according to SoS, his findings show that most of the useful work re:stropping on compound is done within the first few strops. that may have only been for chromium oxide though, not diamond paste
 

HappyamateurDK

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For kitchen knives, yes imo. For any strop with compound/abrasive on (paste, chromium or aluminum oxide), you will want a maximum of 2 or maybe 3 passes each side. I would not do any more. You can be a bit more aggressive on a harder surface like balsa, but if you have paste on leather, you do really risk over-polishing and over-convexing the edge (and this is coming from me; a big fan of stropping). There are some brilliant articles on Science of sharp.*

(also, remember to clean the knife well before use, because you don't wanna eat any diamonds!)

*also, according to SoS, his findings show that most of the useful work re:stropping on compound is done within the first few strops. that may have only been for chromium oxide though, not diamond paste
thanks..i will try to limit it to a few stroke, and see how it works.

will over-convexing be an issue when the strop is mounted on a board, or is it mostly when stropping on a loose belt ? The paste I use is a chromium oxide paste. And only 60.000 grit.
 
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