Syuuji vs Noborikoi

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SilverSwarfer

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I noticed recently while browsing through some Toyama options online, that there were offered knives of the same configuration and nearly identical specs (size, weight, steel, handle), but with different prices and kanji/labels.

I gather that Syuuji may be the standard Toyama “brand” while “Noborikoi” is a separate vendor’s line.

My question is: what is the real difference?

I understand some vendors are able to communicate certain specifications and/or quality expectations to makers. Is that generally true, as in- do some vendors earn a right to add their brands on the maker’s knife?

Any insight here would be much appreciated!
 

F-Flash

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I think same maker, those syuujis are just older. Hence the price difference too.

Edit. Syuujis been out of stock for many years.
 

SilverSwarfer

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I think same maker, those syuujis are just older. Hence the price difference too.

Edit. Syuujis been out of stock for many years.
So possibly the price difference could be due to the likelihood that Syuuji version pricing is from several years ago?
 

Brontes

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For quite a while the difference besides the price was that the Syuuji was offered in white steel, no longer the case. I could be wrong, my assumption was that Toyama referred to the location of the forage ie;Toyama Prefecture, and Syuuji or Noborikoi referred to the brand.
 

Silky

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I was always under the impression that the blacksmith's name was Syuuji Toyama and Noborikoi (meaning "climbing/jumping carp") was the JNS line from him. It seems like JNS has an animal theme with their lines, kaeru (frog), noborikoi (koi fish), kikuryu (dragon), and Kato workhorse using the kanji for horse. Could all be coincidence though, just my assumptions.
 
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