Takeda tips

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Ironn5

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Hello guys! Thinking bout getting a takeda large NAS cleaver and wanting to know highs and lows from every takeda owner here in the forum, so i get to know everything bout them, sharpening, maintenance, food realase, comfort on hand... etc. Thx in advice!
 

mcl911

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I have a240 sasanoha and 270 suji from Takeda both NAS, I don't have any problem with Takeda's grind or f&f. The sasanoha is quite flexible at the tip where the suji is surprisingly sturdy. It's seldom that people complain about Takeda's cleaver most people describe it as a monster as least from my experience. Takeda's grind and size are going to be different from knife to knife which will affect comfort on hand. The most common issue with Takeda will it might requires thinning and Takeda's AS will definitely not your favorite steel to sharpen or thinning due to it's toughness. Takeda are extremely thin and I have seen couple knives break into half near tang.
 
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I don't have the cleaver but I do have a Takeda medium gyuto (250 mm) and koSasa (basically a 170 petty). I'm a big fan. Not the most fancy knives but made to perform. Maintenance: almost none, just keep dry. Food release, among the best, see also here: like a naughty school boy
Comfort: for me very comfortable. Make sure you like a cleaver. I've had a (Chinese) cleaver before and didn't like it. That's personal really.
Takedas are thin and feel nimble but the big surface of metal makes you still have some weight to help you push through produce.
Sharpening: it takes a bit more time as you don't just sharpen the edge but the entire bevel (zero-grind). So every time you sharpen you also thin the knife, I believe this is a quite unique feature. The 4-5 mm bevel consists of about half aogami super and about half stainless cladding. I would advise to start at 400-500 grit, otherwise it takes too long.
Despite the acute angle (8° per side) the edge is not that prone to chipping, probably because these knifes are hardened to "only" 62 hrc in order to make the steel thougher.
The cleaver has no flat spot but a gentle curve along the edge, so make sure this profile suits you.
One thing that keeps coming back is that Takedas wedge and need thinning. I believe this dates from a few years back (2010-2015?) when Takeda had a shortage of trained staff and less good quality control and part of the production was too thick. (You don't want a thick Takeda). As far as I know there is no issue with recent and older (AS) knives, but something to bear in mind when you buy a used one.
 

btbyrd

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The issue with wedging comes from the fact that the thickest part of the blade, apart from the spine, is like one CM behind the edge where the grind starts. That's part of the forged geometry which is unique to each blade. Each Takeda is a unique snowflake, and some have more issues than others when it comes to whether wedging was a problem. On my two gyutos, it was a problem. So much so on the 210 that I had to send it in to be thinned by a pro. I couldn't cut onions with it without worrying that I was going to cut myself because of the wedging. After a tune up, it's much better.
All that's to say, it's hard to generalize about Takedas because they vary a lot from knife to knife, and can even vary along the same blade. My 300mm was wedgey for most of the blade, but there was about 8-10cm where it was a good performer and I could sort of leverage that section to cut what the rest of the blade had a more difficult time cutting.
And I'd second the post above that mentions how curvy the profile is. I prefer cleavers on the flatter side, and the Takeda has no flat spot. His knives have profiles that are mostly continuous arcs, and you may have to adjust your cutting technique to get the most out of them.
 

Ironn5

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I don't have the cleaver but I do have a Takeda medium gyuto (250 mm) and koSasa (basically a 170 petty). I'm a big fan. Not the most fancy knives but made to perform. Maintenance: almost none, just keep dry. Food release, among the best, see also here: like a naughty school boy
Comfort: for me very comfortable. Make sure you like a cleaver. I've had a (Chinese) cleaver before and didn't like it. That's personal really.
Takedas are thin and feel nimble but the big surface of metal makes you still have some weight to help you push through produce.
Sharpening: it takes a bit more time as you don't just sharpen the edge but the entire bevel (zero-grind). So every time you sharpen you also thin the knife, I believe this is a quite unique feature. The 4-5 mm bevel consists of about half aogami super and about half stainless cladding. I would advise to start at 400-500 grit, otherwise it takes too long.
Despite the acute angle (8° per side) the edge is not that prone to chipping, probably because these knifes are hardened to "only" 62 hrc in order to make the steel thougher.
The cleaver has no flat spot but a gentle curve along the edge, so make sure this profile suits you.
One thing that keeps coming back is that Takedas wedge and need thinning. I believe this dates from a few years back (2010-2015?) when Takeda had a shortage of trained staff and less good quality control and part of the production was too thick. (You don't want a thick Takeda). As far as I know there is no issue with recent and older (AS) knives, but something to bear in mind when you buy a used one.
Well, thats a freaking good answer, It covers almost all (if not all) my doubts bout the knife. The fact of the food release and the maintenance being almost none cause of the ss cladding makes it right for my demands. A cleaver is not a problem since i work latelly with a 180mm SG2 Mcusta and the Suien VC cleaver, so the belly isnt a problem neither (in fact i fidnt it interesting to change the way you cut from chopping to rocking. Definetly your post was so so usefull. Ty very much!
 

Ironn5

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The issue with wedging comes from the fact that the thickest part of the blade, apart from the spine, is like one CM behind the edge where the grind starts. That's part of the forged geometry which is unique to each blade. Each Takeda is a unique snowflake, and some have more issues than others when it comes to whether wedging was a problem. On my two gyutos, it was a problem. So much so on the 210 that I had to send it in to be thinned by a pro. I couldn't cut onions with it without worrying that I was going to cut myself because of the wedging. After a tune up, it's much better.
All that's to say, it's hard to generalize about Takedas because they vary a lot from knife to knife, and can even vary along the same blade. My 300mm was wedgey for most of the blade, but there was about 8-10cm where it was a good performer and I could sort of leverage that section to cut what the rest of the blade had a more difficult time cutting.
And I'd second the post above that mentions how curvy the profile is. I prefer cleavers on the flatter side, and the Takeda has no flat spot. His knives have profiles that are mostly continuous arcs, and you may have to adjust your cutting technique to get the most out of them.
That is interesting too, i was that thick part on photos, wouldnt mind getting it on the stones but a fact to be worried about. Also checked the fujiwara nashiji 225mm cleaver that is pretty flat, but also pretty heavy (around 550gr) which for a daily work of 10 hours more or less is exhausting. The takeda being much lighter than any other full size is one of the facts that makes it so appealing to me.
 

Chicagohawkie

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I bought a Takeda cleaver 7 years ago after thinking this was the coolest thing to buy. The problem with we’re at least for me was huge radious the cutting edge has. It literaly accordions everything I chopped. So after used it once I knew it was never going to work for me. Traded it a week later for 2 Katos. Before you buy a cleaver, ask yourself do I want a flat bottomed cleaver or a radioused bottom cleaver. They are truly 2 different beasts.
 

btbyrd

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I had a similar problem with my gyutos, but I adjusted my cutting technique so that my pinch grip was a little looser and I kind of incorporated a slight rock/pivot into my push cuts and that took care of this. I just push down a bit further and the blade rocks back on the recurve. I still can't just go "tap tap tap tap tap!" like I can with my flatter knives and not get accordioning, but it does the job.
 

Ironn5

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I bought a Takeda cleaver 7 years ago after thinking this was the coolest thing to buy. The problem with we’re at least for me was huge radious the cutting edge has. It literaly accordions everything I chopped. So after used it once I knew it was never going to work for me. Traded it a week later for 2 Katos. Before you buy a cleaver, ask yourself do I want a flat bottomed cleaver or a radioused bottom cleaver. They are truly 2 different beasts.
Thx for the tip! as I said i am able to handle the suien VC which is one of those cleaver with big bellys, also my Mcusta has almost no belly and like it too!
 
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My Takeda nakiri is one of two knives I know id never, ever sell and is my highest performer. Love the steel and thin all the way through but with phenomenal food release. It’s the reason I love nakiris but only on one. They are inconsistent though so being able to handle the one you buy could be good
 

Ironn5

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My Takeda nakiri is one of two knives I know id never, ever sell and is my highest performer. Love the steel and thin all the way through but with phenomenal food release. It’s the reason I love nakiris but only on one. They are inconsistent though so being able to handle the one you buy could be good
Thx for infor, the only thing i will be able to make is to ask for choil photo and photo of the weight i think! I guess im getting ready to buy It when back in stock!
 

Pie

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Thx for infor, the only thing i will be able to make is to ask for choil photo and photo of the weight i think! I guess im getting ready to buy It when back in stock!
Definitely get in touch with the vendor and ask if they’re willing to give you the pick of the litter before they go online/available. A couple retailers have done it for me re: Takeda specifically due to the variation. I’ve been really happy with the results.

Id love to pile the praise onto Takeda’s work, but its been explained well. My 270 gyuto is the first knife off the rack, even if it’s stupid dull and I’m doing fine garlic mince. They’re that good.
 

Ironn5

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Definitely get in touch with the vendor and ask if they’re willing to give you the pick of the litter before they go online/available. A couple retailers have done it for me re: Takeda specifically due to the variation. I’ve been really happy with the results.

Id love to pile the praise onto Takeda’s work, but its been explained well. My 270 gyuto is the first knife off the rack, even if it’s stupid dull and I’m doing fine garlic mince. They’re that good.
Definetly gonna try that. Nice to know they are that freaking good! gonna have fun with it when the time comes!
 
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When you get an in stock notification message the retailer immediately and ask for choil shots, weight, length, and profile shots so you can pick the one you want. That’s what I did. Here are the three choil shots I was sent when there was a NAS “small” restock

37575B0A-5F20-4575-8058-E9A80E8E3C94.jpeg
CDFF997A-8DB8-4F34-9221-AD4DF4EA6380.jpeg
67712CE8-2BE2-4D6D-A731-E9A3EF177E43.jpeg

Pretty clear to see how widely they vary.

I went with #2. I do find it a bit wedgy compared to some of my other knives. I’ll ease the shoulders to alleviate that a bit, just haven’t gotten to it yet. I was also surprised how curvy the profile is, especially toward the heel. I definitely had to adjust my technique to get the most out of it. All in all, a fun knife to have, I think any knife knut should at least try one at some point since they are so unique, but not my favorite knife to use in most situations.

8D6E24FE-B7BE-44AB-B85F-C805BFB0B1FC.jpeg
 

Ironn5

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When you get an in stock notification message the retailer immediately and ask for choil shots, weight, length, and profile shots so you can pick the one you want. That’s what I did. Here are the three choil shots I was sent when there was a NAS “small” restock

View attachment 173844 View attachment 173845 View attachment 173846
Pretty clear to see how widely they vary.

I went with #2. I do find it a bit wedgy compared to some of my other knives. I’ll ease the shoulders to alleviate that a bit, just haven’t gotten to it yet. I was also surprised how curvy the profile is, especially toward the heel. I definitely had to adjust my technique to get the most out of it. All in all, a fun knife to have, I think any knife knut should at least try one at some point since they are so unique, but not my favorite knife to use in most situations.

View attachment 173847
You guys being so helpfull, was thinking bout asing for the same kind of photo, good to see some shops make em. And yeah, i feel like I have to try out one of these bad boys definetly!
 

Ruso

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In general I like my takeda 210 gyuto, or should I call it a mini shovel?
Especially it excells when I need to match-stick root vegetables liks carrots or daikon or beets, etc.
 

Ggmerino

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I have a 240 gyuto. Really liked it when I got it- light, agile, super-sharp zero grind, impeccable food release, sharpens easy and great steel, but it wedged on hard carrots and the taper at the tip was too minimal for tip work or horizontal slices. So after a while I thinned the shoulders at the top of the edge bevel, removed almost all of the inside shoulder and kept a bit of the outside shoulder for food release and went to town on thinning the tip area. Now I love it, no wedging and still good food release- it is exactly the way I want it and it performs. Sharpening the zero grind takes a bit of attention- use markers to get the angle perfect.
 

Ironn5

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So guys, after a crazy month at work I decided to give myself a present and ordered the Takeda NAS big cleaver, think is getting there in one week or so, pretty excited about it. Its gonna be so usefull at work with the stainless clad and the good food release im expecting. This is the choil shot i got send from the thinner they have.
278715110_563609354993014_864721767055851505_n.jpg
 

Ironn5

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So guys, just got my Takeda cleaver 2 days ago, first thing you notice es how big it is but at the same time how ****ing light, people at work and also me the first impresion on hand is... "its made from steel or plastic? is it a toy?" After 2 days cutting a lot of different stuff it performed insanely good on everything, cooked or raw meat, fruits and vegetables, potatoes not sticking anything is one of the most comforting things i ve seen, even more thinking bout the tall blade it is. Overall for my needs, what kind of knives im used to use and performance is a 10/10 buy for me. Another mention bout how it feels on the stones: weird to sharpen so low since u work in all the bevel as u guys mentioned but is pretty fun to have something different to work on and learn about.
 

Pie

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So guys, just got my Takeda cleaver 2 days ago, first thing you notice es how big it is but at the same time how ****ing light, people at work and also me the first impresion on hand is... "its made from steel or plastic? is it a toy?" After 2 days cutting a lot of different stuff it performed insanely good on everything, cooked or raw meat, fruits and vegetables, potatoes not sticking anything is one of the most comforting things i ve seen, even more thinking bout the tall blade it is. Overall for my needs, what kind of knives im used to use and performance is a 10/10 buy for me. Another mention bout how it feels on the stones: weird to sharpen so low since u work in all the bevel as u guys mentioned but is pretty fun to have something different to work on and learn about.
Good buy! Sounds like you’ve checked all the boxes and happy with the performance 👍👍
 

Ironn5

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So guys, just got my Takeda cleaver 2 days ago, first thing you notice es how big it is but at the same time how ****ing light, people at work and also me the first impresion on hand is... "its made from steel or plastic? is it a toy?" After 2 days cutting a lot of different stuff it performed insanely good on everything, cooked or raw meat, fruits and vegetables, potatoes not sticking anything is one of the most comforting things i ve seen, even more thinking bout the tall blade it is. Overall for my needs, what kind of knives im used to use and performance is a 10/10 buy for me. Another mention bout how it feels on the stones: weird to sharpen so low since u work in all the bevel as u guys mentioned but is pretty fun to have something different to work on and learn about.
The video with paper and garlic were made the same day it arrived and i made the bevel the way i like it with suehiro 1k, rika 5k and kitayama 8k. The video with the tomato was made after 2 days of full work 20 hours in total and just a little touch up on a strop with green compound.
 

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