Tallest Point in Western / Wa Handle

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by musicman980, Jun 30, 2018.

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  1. Jun 30, 2018 #1

    musicman980

    musicman980

    musicman980

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    I've got a neat quarter sawn ebony turning blank I'd like to fit to an antique 9" nogent sabatier. Considering the orientation of the grain, the blank can only form a handle 15/16" tall max. Are there any examples of nogent/western or wa handles that only reach this height for a 9" blade? Thanks
     
  2. Jul 3, 2018 #2

    musicman980

    musicman980

    musicman980

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    Does no one want to measure their yo handles? It would be most appreciated!
     
  3. Jul 3, 2018 #3

    McMan

    McMan

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    You'll be fine. Cutting it a little close, but fine...
    Measured a pre-war nogent. The beak at the end of the handle was 1 1/16".
    On late-1800s-early-1900s nogents, the handles were smaller than this and so the beaks will be shorter.
    Just say you're using the 1800s pattern :)
     
  4. Jul 4, 2018 #4

    musicman980

    musicman980

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    Ah thank you. The 19th century, my favorite century! The nogent I have has got to be no later than the first couple decades of the 20th, it's hard to tell though. Here's a link to a post I made about it a while ago that had no replies. https://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/threads/antique-sabatier-k.34001/

    If anyone has any idea when that sabatier was made or other info, it would make it seem less like mystery meat.
     
  5. Jul 4, 2018 #5

    McMan

    McMan

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    I looked at the link... What're the measurements on that knife?
    A couple things... First, that's not a nogent handle. But, the handle looks like it's a decent fit (see how close in size the ferrule and bolster are), so I would wonder if it was a period re-handle by a cutler? Either that or a well-fitting chisel/gouge handle, which is probably more likely. A nogent handle would have the tang going through the handle at the end. Second, I think that's a broken slicer or chefs knife (if it's past 6"). If it's short, then it's also possible its a table knife or what's called an "office knife", which is a 6" give or take, that lost its tip.

    My guess is you've got a broke chefs knife re-handle with a chisel handle. Still an old blade (I'd agree with your 1920s estimate).
     
  6. Jul 4, 2018 #6

    musicman980

    musicman980

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    I've yet to actually hold the knife myself, it's back East, but the blade is 9" and the total length advertised was 14 3/4". I just figured it was a round tip slicer, which I'd then reshape to a chef knife profile.

    How are chisel/gouge handles attached? It just looked like a very rustic nogent to me.
     
  7. Jul 5, 2018 #7

    McMan

    McMan

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    The 90-degree angle at the tip from the spine is why I'm thinking broken blade not rounded-tip slicer. A rounded-tip wouldn't have that corner.
    Like this:
    [​IMG]
     

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