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Chips

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I've kept this one close to the chest since I came up with it in college despite several requests. It always held an edge over anyone else's, but I finally shared it with friends and family, so I figured I'd post it publicly. It's really the only recipe I truly have that's entirely mine. I apologize for the lengthy nature, this is mostly just a cut and paste of the email I sent out to my F&F, most who aren't super into cooking, so I walked them thru my reasoning. TLDR, just skip to the recipe if you don't want my explanation of the odd ingredients.

I fiddled and tweaked this recipe for something like six months until I got it right and continue to adjust over the years. Exact proportions aren't important, what's important is flavor balance and that you don't do anything that'll overshadow the flavor of the avocados. There's about 4 minor tweaks to the recipe that is different than whatever random Guac recipe you could Google and I'll explain their importance. Aside from these little tricks, the thing that matters the most is tasting frequently as you're building it, because all avocados are different and you don't want to mess up the focus on the flavor of the avocado. If you can taste any of the "odd" ingredients, you've screwed something up. Which is why I aways reserve one or two avocados if I need to bring the focus back onto the flavor they provide.

This recipe will take forever to type out, because of explaining what would only take 5 seconds to show in person. It's worth it. Build the recipe in order that the ingredients are listed and it'll also help prevent the avocados from turning brown. The vitamin C (citric acid) from the limes will prevent oxidization (browning) of the diced avocados, as well as Saran Wrap pressed directly onto the smoothed, flat surface of the guac in the bowl, while you let it chill and flavors meld in the fridge.

The "weird" tweaks in red are what make the guacamole so damn good and came from countless amounts of trial and error.

What I like about this recipe is it's not hard and fast. I don't worry about wandering a bit here or there on the ratios a bit, depending on how everything is coming together when tasted, mainly because the size of avocados aren't consistent, and sometimes they have amazing intense flavor, and sometimes they're a bit dull and things need to be tweaked. Lime juice is what will lift up the dull flavor of avocados that aren't at their peak flavor-wise.

I tend to make a big batch since it's a bit labor intensive. Scale accordingly if you like.

You're going to make what looks like the beginning of an incredibly finely diced salsa (minus tomatoes) in one large mixing bowl, and only at the last moment, add the diced avocados and stir gently, breaking things down and tasting, mixing more to get the consistency you like. It always tastes better if you let it rest in the fridge for about 4 hours, covered with plastic wrap that is literally pressed completely against the surface, to prevent any browning.

  • 2 medium limes, juiced into a big metal mixing bowl. I'll usually reserve one half of one, set aside to correct the acidity and balance at the very end. Acidity will perk up flavors and correct for any dull avocados.
  • A large handful of cilantro, pick off only the leaves, no stems at all, diced super fine.
  • One very large white onion, very, very finely diced. You don't want big chunks. And here's the important trick that keeps the onion intensity in check, but still gives you a great texture. You have to "de-flame" the onions. After finely dicing them, you need to put them in a very fine mesh strainer and rinse them under the faucet really good, stir them around, just make sure you're reducing the amount of the strong onions flavor, basically letting a bunch of potent onion juice go right down the drain. Use your hand and gently press the residual water out. You can use a few paper towels if you want, but its not super critical to get them completely dry. But you don't want them soggy either, because it'll just dilute the flavor of everything and make the guacamole soupy. No bueno.
  • 1.5 teaspoons ground cumin, yes you can toast whole cumin in a hot pan then grind, it does make a subtle difference, but not critical.
  • 2 jalapeño peppers, carefully de-seeded, internal ribs removed (if you're a wuss) and very very finely diced.
  • One big clove of garlic, also minced. Don't make the mistake of adding more garlic than this until you've played with the recipe and decided for yourself. But garlic, as beautiful of a flavor it is, will quickly mask the much more expensive and delicate flavor of avocados, so don't go over two medium or one large clove to begin with.
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1.5 teaspoons Soy Sauce. (Yes, odd)
  • 1.5-2 teaspoons Honey (Yes, again, odd)
  • 1 teaspoon finely ground black pepper
Mix all of this in the bowl and set it aside, then work on the avocados. Everything in the "salsa" being diced super fine is important.
  • 8 ripe avocados, prep 6 or 7 of them and keep 1 or 2 set aside if you need to balance out the flavor (mainly because the size of the avocado will dictate exactly how many you need. Carefully remove the rock hard nib that's on the top where it grew from the tree, throw all these bastards out before you move on (I used to prep hundreds of avocados daily after high school when I worked briefly at a local pizza restaurant. That was the pro tip from the owner because of the risk of dental damage claims). Use a sharp knife to cut it in half lengthwise, twist till the two sides release, then very very carefully using the heel section of that sharp chef's knife stab into and twist out the seed. Then grab a simple butter knife or any dull knife and slice cube shaped cuts into the flesh, all the way thru till you feel the knife blade scraping against the back of the avocado skin. Take the biggest tablespoon you have and scrape out these "cubes" into a bowl. It's dealer's choice how thick you want them, since it'll affect the final texture. Use the spoon to scrape every last bit of the avocado out, you'll have some mushy stuff, but mostly cubes. Scoop them out right onto your "salsa" and stir.

The importance of the honey is that it adds a subtle, maybe floral sweetness, which compliments the avocado and it has a bit more flavor than plain sugar. You'd never know it was there if I didn't tell you, but it makes a huge difference. Same for the soy sauce. That's why this big recipe doesn't use much salt. The soy sauce adds saltiness, but also adds umami flavors and rounds things out nicely. Again, you'd never be able to tell it was there, nor should you. But it makes a difference.

That's it, all in one spot. There was a time, literally like a decade or more ago, when I added some very very ripe, finely diced mango into it during one of our summer get-togethers. It adds nice color contrast, but it's not in my usual rotation.

The more you stir and taste for seasoning, the more it'll break down and become creamy.

_MG_2201.jpeg



A different batch, showing the diced onions after de-flaming them.


IMG_1723.jpeg



A batch whipped up for some keto friendly "burrito bowls" a while back.

IMG_1726.jpeg




Enjoy.
 

madelinez

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I agree with most of this recipe and I'm really interested in trying out the soy sauce and honey. Based on my past experiments though garlic is not required (I love garlic but it overpowers guac in my opinion), and I also replace half of the lime juice with finely minced pickled jalapenos instead of fresh jalapenos.

The most important aspect for good guac though is starting with a high quality avocado, in my experience that means a perfectly ripe Hass, Pinkerton or Fuetre. In Australia Lamb Hass is sold as Hass but the flavor difference is huge, if your avocado is larger than a baseball you probably don't have a true hass avocado. I started growing non commercial varieties at my parent's property a decade ago but the good news is hass (not lamb hass) is still the best so there's no need for the more obscure varieties.

TLDR; Choose the right avocado variety for a good guac.
 

ian

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I like a little bit of garlic. Often, I’ll dry toast a clove in its skin and then chop/mash it. That mellows it considerably. Sometimes do that with the onions too.

The soy and honey thing is a cool idea. I’ll have to try it. Sometimes I’m skeptical about the “you won’t taste it, it’ll just make it yummier and you won’t know why” ingredients. IIRC, Kenji Lopez-Alt is all about “umami bombs” like anchovies, marmite, soy, etc... and adds them to all kinds of braises. Whenever I’d do that, I’d just think that my braise tasted like anchovies/marmite/soy, unless I added so little that it didn’t affect the flavor at all. Same with subbing chicken stock for beef stock. Braised beef cooked with chicken stock just taste wrong to me for some reason. I’m willing to admit that maybe some of this is psychological, since I know what went into the dish. If I was served it at a restaurant, maybe I wouldn’t notice and would just appreciate it. In any case, gotta try the soy/honey here. Thanks for the recipe!

It’s great that there are so many guac recipes out there. There’s the one on the bag of Mi Nina tortilla chips where the ingredients are avocados, oregano, onion and salt. I was surprised when I saw that....

 

parbaked

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I was taught guacamole by a high school friend that grew up in Puerto Rico.
4 ingredients...avocado, a little garlic, salt and lime or lemon.
The salsa fresca stuff should be separate from the guacamole...mix it on your chips
61101857389__7C80AF2A-FA68-4A2E-B49A-D53F6997D586.JPG
.
 

marc4pt0

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A lot of my Hispanic coworkers have multiple family recipes from their homes south of the border. All are touted as “authentic”. Here is what I would argue when saying a given recipe is authentic: guacamole basically translates to avocado sauce (mole). So really anything with avocado as a base and is in a spreadabke or pourable consistency is “guacamole“.

I like the rinsing of the onion in the opening recip. This is something I do often, and used to do for salsas and guacamole. Now at home I do something similar but find more tasty- I dry pickle my minced onion with equal amounts of sugar and salt, then let set for 10 to 20 minutes before thoroughly rinsing in cold water.
 

ian

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Yea, sometimes I’ll also wet pickle the onion in lime juice first, which also mellows it somewhat.

Same philosophy as when you’re making a salad dressing with shallots: let the minced shallots sit alone in the vinegar (and salt) for 15 min before adding the oil and they’ll be tamed and work much better in the dressing.

The only constant in my guacamole recipe is that it changes every single time.
 

YumYumSauce

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Interesting. Will have to set aside a small amount to try this next time I make guac
 

LuvDog

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I’ve always added honey to mine... it really helps bring out some extra flavors
 

Rotem Shoshani

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Close to mine, love it.

The last few times I tried making it a guac paste, so instead of all the chopping work, threw all ingredients to the blender and gave a few gentle spins.
Coolest trick ever if you're trying to preserve it for more than 2 days in the fridge - take 1/4 the amount of lime and replace with cold water (tap water ain't good especially if it's hard water).
The last one was good to go after 6 days (!!!) and kept a real vibrant green color
 

rickbern

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I often throw an anchovy in mine, honey sounds interesting . I find using a lava mortar (can’t think of the name, mocate?) has a big influence on the flavor of the final product. But I have almost as many mortars and pestles as gyutos.
 
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rickbern

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Yea, sometimes I’ll also wet pickle the onion in lime juice first, which also mellows it somewhat.

Same philosophy as when you’re making a salad dressing with shallots: let the minced shallots sit alone in the vinegar (and salt) for 15 min before adding the oil and they’ll be tamed and work much better in the dressing.

The only constant in my guacamole recipe is that it changes every single time.
I came across a Turkish potato salad recipe where you took raw onion and tossed it with a half tbsp of sumac and salt to temper the intensity. Worked really well, the onions were extraordinary.
 

Rotem Shoshani

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I came across a Turkish potato salad recipe where you took raw onion and tossed it with a half tbsp of sumac and salt to temper the intensity. Worked really well, the onions were extraordinary.
Very common in here, shawarma stands will almost always have this, I love it.
 

Chips

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I often throw an anchovy in mine, honey sounds interesting . I find using a lava mortar (can’t think of the name, mocate?) has a big influence on the flavor of the final product. But I have almost as many mortars and pestles as gyutos.
Molcajete. Yeah, I've considered buying one, more so for the looks, but I already have a small mortar and pestle, a huge suribachi, in addition to spice grinders. I'm running out of space! Lol. The last time I dug up some info on molcajetes, it seemed like it was a pain in the butt unless you bought it local and didn't have to deal with heavy shipping, and on top of that, you wanted to make sure it wasn't some sort of concrete knock-off.

My onions in that second picture are garbage. I usually dice much finer than that. :)
 

rickbern

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Molcajete. Yeah, I've considered buying one, more so for the looks, but I already have a small mortar and pestle, a huge suribachi, in addition to spice grinders. I'm running out of space! Lol. The last time I dug up some info on molcajetes, it seemed like it was a pain in the butt unless you bought it local and didn't have to deal with heavy shipping, and on top of that, you wanted to make sure it wasn't some sort of concrete knock-off.

My onions in that second picture are garbage. I usually dice much finer than that. :)
Family photo, 240 kochi for scale. Bigger is better, the one liter Thai granite is my favorite.

I use the Mexican one for avocados, the marble one for herb things like pesto and salsa verde, the big Thai for everything and the wooden Ghanaian one for quick spice grinding in the kitchen (contemplating upgrading this one). The oval shape Nepalese one I use for holding collar stays.

Seriously, don’t get a decorative one. For a home cook from setup to cleanup they’re faster and more fun than a food processor. Plus you control texture and flavor release from things like garlic and pine nuts.

It’ll change your game

image.jpg
 

Chips

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If you have guests who've never experienced caviar limes (also known as finger limes) before, then it's a fun spin to throw into the mix. It'll definitely add a textural sparkle to the guac, but not something I do that often. The last time I was down in the Santa Barbara area, it was easy buying bulk bags of them. They made for fun additions to cocktails too.
 

Danzo

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I've kept this one close to the chest since I came up with it in college despite several requests. It always held an edge over anyone else's, but I finally shared it with friends and family, so I figured I'd post it publicly. It's really the only recipe I truly have that's entirely mine. I apologize for the lengthy nature, this is mostly just a cut and paste of the email I sent out to my F&F, most who aren't super into cooking, so I walked them thru my reasoning. TLDR, just skip to the recipe if you don't want my explanation of the odd ingredients.

I fiddled and tweaked this recipe for something like six months until I got it right and continue to adjust over the years. Exact proportions aren't important, what's important is flavor balance and that you don't do anything that'll overshadow the flavor of the avocados. There's about 4 minor tweaks to the recipe that is different than whatever random Guac recipe you could Google and I'll explain their importance. Aside from these little tricks, the thing that matters the most is tasting frequently as you're building it, because all avocados are different and you don't want to mess up the focus on the flavor of the avocado. If you can taste any of the "odd" ingredients, you've screwed something up. Which is why I aways reserve one or two avocados if I need to bring the focus back onto the flavor they provide.

This recipe will take forever to type out, because of explaining what would only take 5 seconds to show in person. It's worth it. Build the recipe in order that the ingredients are listed and it'll also help prevent the avocados from turning brown. The vitamin C (citric acid) from the limes will prevent oxidization (browning) of the diced avocados, as well as Saran Wrap pressed directly onto the smoothed, flat surface of the guac in the bowl, while you let it chill and flavors meld in the fridge.

The "weird" tweaks in red are what make the guacamole so damn good and came from countless amounts of trial and error.

What I like about this recipe is it's not hard and fast. I don't worry about wandering a bit here or there on the ratios a bit, depending on how everything is coming together when tasted, mainly because the size of avocados aren't consistent, and sometimes they have amazing intense flavor, and sometimes they're a bit dull and things need to be tweaked. Lime juice is what will lift up the dull flavor of avocados that aren't at their peak flavor-wise.

I tend to make a big batch since it's a bit labor intensive. Scale accordingly if you like.

You're going to make what looks like the beginning of an incredibly finely diced salsa (minus tomatoes) in one large mixing bowl, and only at the last moment, add the diced avocados and stir gently, breaking things down and tasting, mixing more to get the consistency you like. It always tastes better if you let it rest in the fridge for about 4 hours, covered with plastic wrap that is literally pressed completely against the surface, to prevent any browning.

  • 2 medium limes, juiced into a big metal mixing bowl. I'll usually reserve one half of one, set aside to correct the acidity and balance at the very end. Acidity will perk up flavors and correct for any dull avocados.
  • A large handful of cilantro, pick off only the leaves, no stems at all, diced super fine.
  • One very large white onion, very, very finely diced. You don't want big chunks. And here's the important trick that keeps the onion intensity in check, but still gives you a great texture. You have to "de-flame" the onions. After finely dicing them, you need to put them in a very fine mesh strainer and rinse them under the faucet really good, stir them around, just make sure you're reducing the amount of the strong onions flavor, basically letting a bunch of potent onion juice go right down the drain. Use your hand and gently press the residual water out. You can use a few paper towels if you want, but its not super critical to get them completely dry. But you don't want them soggy either, because it'll just dilute the flavor of everything and make the guacamole soupy. No bueno.
  • 1.5 teaspoons ground cumin, yes you can toast whole cumin in a hot pan then grind, it does make a subtle difference, but not critical.
  • 2 jalapeño peppers, carefully de-seeded, internal ribs removed (if you're a wuss) and very very finely diced.
  • One big clove of garlic, also minced. Don't make the mistake of adding more garlic than this until you've played with the recipe and decided for yourself. But garlic, as beautiful of a flavor it is, will quickly mask the much more expensive and delicate flavor of avocados, so don't go over two medium or one large clove to begin with.
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1.5 teaspoons Soy Sauce. (Yes, odd)
  • 1.5-2 teaspoons Honey (Yes, again, odd)
  • 1 teaspoon finely ground black pepper


  • 8 ripe avocados, prep 6 or 7 of them and keep 1 or 2 set aside if you need to balance out the flavor (mainly because the size of the avocado will dictate exactly how many you need. Carefully remove the rock hard nib that's on the top where it grew from the tree, throw all these bastards out before you move on (I used to prep hundreds of avocados daily after high school when I worked briefly at a local pizza restaurant. That was the pro tip from the owner because of the risk of dental damage claims). Use a sharp knife to cut it in half lengthwise, twist till the two sides release, then very very carefully using the heel section of that sharp chef's knife stab into and twist out the seed. Then grab a simple butter knife or any dull knife and slice cube shaped cuts into the flesh, all the way thru till you feel the knife blade scraping against the back of the avocado skin. Take the biggest tablespoon you have and scrape out these "cubes" into a bowl. It's dealer's choice how thick you want them, since it'll affect the final texture. Use the spoon to scrape every last bit of the avocado out, you'll have some mushy stuff, but mostly cubes. Scoop them out right onto your "salsa" and stir.

The importance of the honey is that it adds a subtle, maybe floral sweetness, which compliments the avocado and it has a bit more flavor than plain sugar. You'd never know it was there if I didn't tell you, but it makes a huge difference. Same for the soy sauce. That's why this big recipe doesn't use much salt. The soy sauce adds saltiness, but also adds umami flavors and rounds things out nicely. Again, you'd never be able to tell it was there, nor should you. But it makes a difference.

That's it, all in one spot. There was a time, literally like a decade or more ago, when I added some very very ripe, finely diced mango into it during one of our summer get-togethers. It adds nice color contrast, but it's not in my usual rotation.

The more you stir and taste for seasoning, the more it'll break down and become creamy.

View attachment 80885


A different batch, showing the diced onions after de-flaming them.


View attachment 80886


A batch whipped up for some keto friendly "burrito bowls" a while back.

View attachment 80884



Enjoy.
Nice, love me some guac. Also I was wondering where that ashi magic wand went. I hope it’s treating you well and the handle is holding up.
 

Bert2368

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Instead of using any onions at all, try using finely chopped CHIVES. I usually add just a bit of fresh Mexican oregano too, if I have a plant growing nearby.

Instead of jalapenos, use serrano chilis. Ideally, serranos that have turned red. I always remove the pith, use more chilis if you want it hotter.

Also, if you need to keep the guacamole a nice unoxidized green while storing it for a while, rather than devouring it instantly, put ONE of the avocado seeds per abou 4 avocados back into the finished guacamole, then carefully smooth a layer of saran wrap down directly onto the smoothed down surface of the guacamole to prevent contact with the air. Of course, remove the seed(s) before serving- I don't know the chemistry of this, but it works. The pit as a preservative and the chives instead of onions are from one of those "secret Mexican family recipes". Check it out and see what you think.

I am so happy NO ONE here has suggested mayonnaise as a guacamole ingredient (shudder!). Midwestern guacamole is nearly as questionable as midwestern sushi... I have actually heard people ask "why is your guacamole green instead of brown?"
 
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Chips

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I've never tried the pit added to the guac thing, mainly because plastic wrap always did the job fine and the pit thing has been suggested to be another culinary myth.
 

Chips

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Nice, love me some guac. Also I was wondering where that ashi magic wand went. I hope it’s treating you well and the handle is holding up.
Been thinking about sending it to Jon for a polish. Can't decide. I'm too afraid to use it nowadays. Snapped some pics a few weeks ago.


_MG_3248.jpeg
_MG_3264 2.jpeg
_MG_3269.jpeg
 

tyfabes

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I'll definitely give this a try. I've made a ton of different recipes and have always gone back to avocado, red onion, lime juice, cilantro, and salt. Couldn't be better, IMO.
 

ian

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Yea, the pit thing totally seems like a myth to me. The avo doesn’t turn brown where it contacts the pit because it doesn’t contact the air. It may work better than plastic wrap, because it may have better contact with the guac and because it’s not as breathable. (Saran wrap does let in a bit of air, I think?) But it’s only going to affect the guac directly in contact with it.
 

Ultrafiche

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Family photo, 240 kochi for scale. Bigger is better, the one liter Thai granite is my favorite.

I use the Mexican one for avocados, the marble one for herb things like pesto and salsa verde, the big Thai for everything and the wooden Ghanaian one for quick spice grinding in the kitchen (contemplating upgrading this one). The oval shape Nepalese one I use for holding collar stays.

Seriously, don’t get a decorative one. For a home cook from setup to cleanup they’re faster and more fun than a food processor. Plus you control texture and flavor release from things like garlic and pine nuts.

It’ll change your game

View attachment 81126
Can I ask where you picked up your molcajete?

I bought one in Mexico City last year with the intention of bringing it back with me, but they took it at security! Apparently you're not allowed to bring rocks in your carry on bag, since it can be used as a weapon. I guess I get it, but it's a bit comical to me... by that logic, a lot of objects could be considered a weapon.

So now I'm on the hunt for a new molcajete and am bracing myself to have to pay triple the price.
 

Ultrafiche

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Also, thanks for the recipe - I'm going to give it a shot.

One question that I've been wondering - do you guys use your hard j-knives to remove avocado pits, or would you avoid it, particularly since sometimes it's followed by a slight twisty motion to loosen the pit from the flesh?
 

Qapla'

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Also, thanks for the recipe - I'm going to give it a shot.

One question that I've been wondering - do you guys use your hard j-knives to remove avocado pits, or would you avoid it, particularly since sometimes it's followed by a slight twisty motion to loosen the pit from the flesh?
I thought j-knife users would simply slash right through the avocado pits? Stuff like this comes to mind.

Though I'm not sure if that'd be quite as viable with a single-bevel j-knife.
 

labor of love

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Yea, the pit thing totally seems like a myth to me. The avo doesn’t turn brown where it contacts the pit because it doesn’t contact the air. It may work better than plastic wrap, because it may have better contact with the guac and because it’s not as breathable. (Saran wrap does let in a bit of air, I think?) But it’s only going to affect the guac directly in contact with it.
I’ve seen guys put just a couple ounces of water on top of guacamole before it’s stored. I guess if you make guacamole thick enough you pour it right off later before use.
 

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