The physics of tossing fried rice

Discussion in 'Whats Cooking? Food, Drink, & Gear' started by milkbaby, Feb 14, 2020.

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  1. Feb 14, 2020 #1

    milkbaby

    milkbaby

    milkbaby

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    The Physics of Tossing Fried Rice was recently published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface:
    https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsif.2019.0622
    Fried rice is a 1500-year-old dish that is prepared using wok tossing, a technique that enables food to undergo temperatures of 1200°C without burning. Tossing of the heavy wok at high speed may be one contributor to shoulder pain, which is reported by 64.5% of Chinese restaurant chefs. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we report the wok tossing kinematics of five professional restaurant chefs. The wok toss has a period of 0.3 s and involves two directions of movement: translation, which slides the rice along the wok, and rotation, which throws the rice into the air. We report the chosen kinematics of the chefs and use a theoretical model to predict the trajectory of rice based on projectile motion. Using our model, we rank all possible kinematics in terms of three metrics: the proportion of the rice that is tossed, its flight height and the angular displacement of the rice. We identify an optimal regime for making fried rice and suggest ways that wok tossing may be improved. This study may inspire the design of stir-fry robotics and exoskeletons to reduce the rate of muscle strain injury among professional chefs.
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    You might not see the article without a subscription but abstract and reportage below:
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/339205381_The_physics_of_tossing_fried_rice
    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/how-make-best-fried-rice-according-physics-video
    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-subtle-science-wok-tossing.html
     
  2. Feb 14, 2020 #2
    Cool! Thanks for posting this. I like this kind of nerdy :)

    But about those 1200 degrees Celsius - when exactly does the rice get to be exposed to that?
     
  3. Feb 14, 2020 #3

    Xenif

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    The scientist and the chinese in me both thank you for sharing this article
     
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  4. Feb 14, 2020 #4

    Caleb Cox

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    Delightfully nerdy! I'm waiting on video of rice tossing robot. If there's enough demand they'll make it happen. There are super expensive robots just for applying rice to nori sheets, and for making nigiri balls.
     
  5. Feb 14, 2020 #5

    Michi

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  6. Feb 15, 2020 #6

    Kippington

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    Speaking as someone that has worked with steel at those temps, and also worked on professional wok stations, I can't imagine when the rice would ever get exposed to something like that.

    For reference, steel glows bright yellow at 1200°C, and cast iron can melt. I never got the wok to anything over a dull cherry red, maybe 600°C, and even that is insanely hot for cooking.

    Come to think of it, it would be a great way to mess up a perfectly good wok. They are easy enough to dent at room temperature...
     
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  7. Feb 15, 2020 #7

    F-Flash

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    Maybe those should be Fahrenheit 1200 and 1000.. 650-540 Celsius

    Edit. Molten lava is from 700 to 1200 Celsius as reference
     
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  8. Feb 15, 2020 #8

    Kippington

    Kippington

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    That sounds far more likely.
     
  9. Feb 15, 2020 #9

    Midsummer

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  10. Feb 15, 2020 #10

    ian

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    Even in F, some of these temps seem a little wonky:

    “Wok hei is a type of browning, enabled by the Maillard [4] chemical reaction that takes place only when the wok surface reaches 1000°C.”

    Pretty sure I’ve browned stuff at less than 1000 F.
     
  11. Feb 15, 2020 #11

    Xenif

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    Maillard reaction happens around 150c/300f, no idea what will happen to sugars and amino acids at 1000degrees c or f
     
  12. Feb 15, 2020 #12

    McMan

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    1200C is 2192F !
    Didn’t know peanut oil had that high a smoke point...
     
  13. Feb 15, 2020 #13

    Brian Weekley

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    There will be a short test on all of this. KKF users who score less than 90% on the test will have their posting privileges suspended for 30 days or until they score 100% on retest.

    You may think all of this knife and cooking stuff is a hobby. It’s not! Get your sh*t together KKF members.

    Note ... Supporting members of KKF only have to score 80% to pass. We’ve already proven that we have our stuff together.
     
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  14. Feb 15, 2020 #14

    Caleb Cox

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    There's a lot of curriculum, this thread has angular momentum and temperature gradients. Other threads will teach you about the body part next to the fingernail, the coticule.
     
  15. Feb 15, 2020 #15

    Brian Weekley

    Brian Weekley

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    I think the best part is where we learn about denting white hot woks ... that’s pretty cool ... har....har...har!

    Not that I’m trying to make light of this vitally important subject.
     
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  16. Feb 18, 2020 #16

    waruixd

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    Washing the rice after it is cooked helps when doing fried rice. Rises off the extra starch.
     
  17. Mar 4, 2020 #17

    spyken

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    this is super nerdy. but funny. there are 2 schools of thought - focus on the rice, or, focus on the wok/technique. I think it's a bit of both. one thing, you can't ever get the 50,000BTU (?) of those jet-flames in Chinese wok chau / zichar /restaurant burners at home and so rice tends to stick without the wok-searing effect
     

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