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Thinning and polishing

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Nick112

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hi im curious if anyone have any facts about this, not only guesses.

For a normal polishing for removing patina, how much material do you actual remove in mm (or parts of mm)?

The same for a thinning, how much material in mm do you remove?

Sure I understand everyone does it differently, but again, Im asking if someone actually know this, i.e ”when I, or when he/she did it that one time, it removed xx”.

Thanks

Again just curious. Saw a knife that was 25 years old and it was like 15 mm less height, but that is another question
 

ian

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hi im curious if anyone have any facts about this, not only guesses.

For a normal polishing for removing patina, how much material do you actual remove in mm (or parts of mm)?

The same for a thinning, how much material in mm do you remove?

Sure I understand everyone does it differently, but again, Im asking if someone actually know this, i.e ”when I, or when he/she did it that one time, it removed xx”.

Thanks

Again just curious. Saw a knife that was 25 years old and it was like 15 mm less height, but that is another question
For polishing, are you really interested in measurements like .0001 mm? Pretty sure you could polish a knife with flitz continuously for months before getting through a milimeter. (Of course, it depends what you are using to remove the patina. If you are using 50 grit sandpaper, your numbers may vary...)

For thinning, I recently had a knife that measured .7 mm thick at a distance of 5 mm from the edge. I took it down to around .5 mm thick, using an atoma 140 and a King 300, primarily. Took a while: I don’t remember exactly how long, but maybe 20 min of thinning and then a bunch of polishing. (20 min may be innaccurate.)

Edit: do not use 50 grit sandpaper to remove patina.
 
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Benuser

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Perform thinning parallel to the stone.

Thumb rule I use for thickness behind the edge: 0.2mm immediately behind the bevel, 0.5mm at 5mm from there, 1mm at 1cm towards the spine.
Lock a micrometer at 0.5/1mm and see where the blade glides through it.
 

inferno

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hi im curious if anyone have any facts about this, not only guesses.

For a normal polishing for removing patina, how much material do you actual remove in mm (or parts of mm)?

The same for a thinning, how much material in mm do you remove?

Sure I understand everyone does it differently, but again, Im asking if someone actually know this, i.e ”when I, or when he/she did it that one time, it removed xx”.

Thanks

Again just curious. Saw a knife that was 25 years old and it was like 15 mm less height, but that is another question
if you get a new knife and maybe you want to "flatten" the edge up to maybe 20mm or so. then you could be removing a quite a lot of material to get it flat. possibly up to 0,3mm or so. and it would take quite a bit of time to do.

but for regular, lets call it "cleaning", you might me removing a few hundreds (mm) to get stuff shiny.
 
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