Thinning question

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by metamorpheus, Mar 23, 2020.

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums by donating:

  1. Mar 23, 2020 #1

    metamorpheus

    metamorpheus

    metamorpheus

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2018
    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Seattle
    When you're breaking in a knife that's never been thinned, trying to remove all grind marks, and the edge is turning into aluminum foil and peeling away, when do you reprofile? Historically I've done it after I finish polishing and prior to sharpening. I'm thinking of doing it once all the marks are gone prior to blending on the coarsest stone. Any advantage either way?
     
  2. Mar 25, 2020 #2

    stringer

    stringer

    stringer

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2018
    Messages:
    693
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    I generally reprofile by breadknifing until I like the profile. And then start thinning.
     
  3. Mar 25, 2020 #3

    Carl Kotte

    Carl Kotte

    Carl Kotte

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2019
    Messages:
    1,414
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    I usually start by thinning a lot and continue doing so, then raising the angle at the areas where I want to remove more steel at the edge, and then thin some more. I like this approach more than breadknifing, personally. Adjusting the profile of a thin blade is easy; adjusting a thick blade makes me depressed.
     
    Benuser and Runner_up like this.
  4. Mar 25, 2020 #4

    ian

    ian

    ian

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,626
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    Yea, definitely don't reprofile after thinning. If you do that, then the knife will be thick behind the parts of the edge where you take off the most metal during reprofiling. I'd suggest doing both thinning and reprofiling at the same time when possible. That is, thin at a really low angle, creating a zero edge. Change the profile by thinning more in the part of the knife where you want to decrease the height. Make sure to do this on both sides equally to preserve the position of the edge under the spine. It can be a little hard in practice to get the profile to be perfect this way, so I do appreciate the benefits of breadknifing, but this is the easiest way to get the knife to be uniformly thin behind the edge imo. Of course, there are others with more experience.
     
  5. Mar 25, 2020 #5

    birdsfan

    birdsfan

    birdsfan

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2019
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Philly Suburbs
    This is topical for me. I am trying my first thinning as we speak, a Misono Dragon slicer. A lot of "meat on them bones"
     
    Carl Kotte likes this.
  6. Mar 26, 2020 #6

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Messages:
    6,099
    Not wanting to derail the thread. The Misono Swedish can use thinning right behind the edge, but I wouldn't go much further with a slicer. You use it with proteins, after all.
     
    Carl Kotte likes this.
  7. Mar 27, 2020 #7

    gman

    gman

    gman

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2014
    Messages:
    207
    another vote for thinning and profiling together by going to a zero edge and spending extra time on any high spots. i think it's the best way to keep thickness behind the edge consistent down the whole length of the blade.
     
    Benuser likes this.
  8. Mar 27, 2020 #8

    birdsfan

    birdsfan

    birdsfan

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2019
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Philly Suburbs
    Thanks Benuser! Since this is my first try at this I was pretty timid with the stone. as another wise member has said "you can't put the metal back on". Besides, I don't want to screw up the cool engraving!
     
  9. Mar 27, 2020 #9

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Messages:
    6,099
    Neither do you want to jeopardise food release, I guess. Don't flatten the right face.
     
    birdsfan likes this.
  10. Mar 27, 2020 #10

    birdsfan

    birdsfan

    birdsfan

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2019
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Philly Suburbs
    You saved me just in time Benuser. I haven't touched the right side yet, but I was planning to take a little off of it today, to create some symmetry. It is a used model that I bought on e-bay, it has seen some sharpening in its days and was very thick behind the edge, nearly no taper from the spine to behind the edge . I hadn't even thought about food release, so this is a valuable tip.
     
  11. Mar 27, 2020 #11

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Messages:
    6,099
    Symmetry? It's a highly asymmetric blade. Left face flatter, right one convexed, edge off-centered to the left. You want the right bevel to be in line with the face, forming a continuous arc. As for the left side, do what is required to keep steering acceptable. Usually a straight bevel at a higher angle. See how it behaves. You may correct steering by further thinning of the right side, immediately behind the edge. Or, once you get used to steering, thin the left side equally, little by little.
    By the way, a Misono suji has some flex near to the edge, except for the first 2". It is some 0.5mm thick at 5mm from the edge, at the middle of the blade.
    To give an idea, here the same configuration, with a fat yo-deba. Right side left on the photo.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2020
    stringer likes this.
  12. Mar 27, 2020 #12

    birdsfan

    birdsfan

    birdsfan

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2019
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Philly Suburbs
    Yes, you are correct. Forgive my newbie use of the wrong term. That is my intent in touching the right side, to return it to a continuous arc. The picture is extremely helpful.
     
    Benuser likes this.

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page

Group Builder