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Thinning Single Bevel Knives

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Sarge

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I'm certainly not looking to try this I'm wonder if it is possible or if it ever done. I can only guess that you start by grinding away above the shinogi line, but it just seems like a good way to start wrecking a knife.

Anyone ever done this or seen it done. Again I'm not looking to do it just a curiosity.
 

Pensacola Tiger

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Because of how single bevel knives are designed to be used, I wouldn't think there'd be much point to it.

I can think of only one reason to do something like this and that would be to move the shinogi line back down after it was moved up while repairing a really damaged knife.
 

UglyJoe

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If you sharpen correctly you are "thinning" the knife simultaneously with sharpening it. This is why you NEVER put a new edge bevel on a single bevel knife. You should be raising the shinogi simultaneously with raising the edge itself, so the blade road remains uniform and the knifes geometry remains the same. If you add an edge bevel without blending it into the main bevel and raising the shinogi a complimentary and correct amount, you are sharpening incorrectly.

However, if you wish to thin the the knife and bring the shinogi back down a bit then you would thin above the bevel. I've seen this done before, but it is by no means "regular" maintenance of the knife. This is maintenance meant to extend the life of a knife that has been well used all ready.
 

Sarge

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If you sharpen correctly you are "thinning" the knife simultaneously with sharpening it. This is why you NEVER put a new edge bevel on a single bevel knife. You should be raising the shinogi simultaneously with raising the edge itself, so the blade road remains uniform and the knifes geometry remains the same. If you add an edge bevel without blending it into the main bevel and raising the shinogi a complimentary and correct amount, you are sharpening incorrectly.

However, if you wish to thin the the knife and bring the shinogi back down a bit then you would thin above the bevel. I've seen this done before, but it is by no means "regular" maintenance of the knife. This is maintenance meant to extend the life of a knife that has been well used all ready.
Makes sense and that has been my experience and understanding with my knives. Like I said I'd just never heard of it(probably for good reason) so I thought I'd ask.
Thanks for the info
 

Citizen Snips

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i would not ever try to change the geometry of a single bevel knife. with any quality single bevel maker, great care has gone into the crafting of a knife that shouldn't be messed with. when i sharpen my single bevels, i do everything i can to preserve the integrity of how the knife was crafted and to keep the knife in working shape as long as possible. i think the explanation by ugly joe says it all
 
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