Thoughts on Mazaki Gyuto

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by jacko9, Dec 12, 2019.

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  1. Dec 12, 2019 #1

    jacko9

    jacko9

    jacko9

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    Last December I picked up a Mazaki 90mm Stainless Petty and a 180mm Gyuto from JNS. I never got around to trying the Gyuto until this week. Out of the Box I was surprised that it couldn't cut through a tough onion skin and when forced it wedged in the onion. Who else has experience with this type of knife? Do I need to do some thinning with this knife or just go through a sharpening progression? Just looking to see what others have experienced with this makers products. The 90mm Stainless Petty is a really nice cutter.
     
  2. Dec 12, 2019 #2

    TSF415

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    I have a 240mm and a 180mm petty from ckc. Both came with extremely thin tips. I tipped the gyuto first time touching the board. Used it for a day and then put it away. Brought it out recently to give it another go and was still a bit unimpressed so I took it to the stones and that’s when the magic happened. Sharpened so easily and became an enjoyable knife after.
     
  3. Dec 12, 2019 #3

    Nemo

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    I find that the edge on simple carbon steels often dissipates with time, even if not used. Usually super easy to refresh, though. Sometimes with just a bit of stropping.
     
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  4. Dec 12, 2019 #4
    There is little point to try to assess a new knife before sharpening it. Just give it a fresh edge and then test again.

    Aside from that - Mazaki knives have so many different forms and fluctuations that it is hard to make any generalizations. If you land one that suits your needs than you will have a great knife. The HT is really good.
     
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  5. Dec 12, 2019 #5

    madelinez

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    I would like to politely disagree :)
    A carbon steel's edge shouldn't deteriorate that much over a reasonable time-frame such as 6 months. I know this isn't universal among Japanese makers but the knife should have a finished edge and be stored in a way that won't see it degrade before it gets to the customer. Both of these things are achieved easily. There are a lot of good knives out there that do need an edge put on them, so a knife not coming with one doesn't make it bad, but I feel like at those price points it's a bit of a let down.
     
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  6. Dec 12, 2019 #6

    J.C

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    Give it a good strop and it should cut like dream!
     
  7. Dec 12, 2019 #7

    CiderBear

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    It is what it is. This is why a lot of dealers offer honbazuke sharpening, often at no or low cost.
     
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  8. Dec 12, 2019 #8

    Ivang

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    I dont expect any kind of edge on my new knives, i do like a pleasant surprise, though.
    I thought mazakis were hand finished on sharpening stones, but then again, seems to be a lot of variation from one line to the other
     
  9. Dec 12, 2019 #9

    jacko9

    jacko9

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    It looks like my Mazaki was hand sharpened on stones but it is still wedging so I'm going to have to experiment starting g with stropping, then if needed going to the stones.
     
  10. Dec 12, 2019 #10

    M1k3

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    Is it wedging or the blade face grabbing?
     
  11. Dec 12, 2019 #11

    LostHighway

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    I have the Mazaki 180 KU Santoku/Bunka also purchased from JNS in late November or early December of 2018. It had the best out of the box edge of any knife I've owned and still cuts great with only some very minor touch ups in the interim. Used exclusively on a Hi-Soft board and in rotation with other knives.
    Luck of the draw apparently.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2019
  12. Dec 12, 2019 #12

    Interapid101

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    +1 on knife to knife variance. I bought two JNS pettys a little over a year ago, one for me and one for my brother in law. The profiles were substantially different, and they cut differently. I took the thinner one with the flatter profile. I'd say I picked the wrong one. His seems to work a little better for me. Too bad he ruined it by letting it totally rust.

    Also not too sharp OOTB. Sharpens very easy, but edge retention is poor on mine.
     
  13. Dec 12, 2019 #13

    jacko9

    jacko9

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    I'd say it is wedging as after I took off the hard onion skin the knife would wedge half way through the onion cut. I put it on my strop today and I'll see how it performs at dinner and report back.
     

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