Three 210mm stainless gyutos compared

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by augerpro, Apr 2, 2015.

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  1. Apr 2, 2015 #1

    augerpro

    augerpro

    augerpro

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    So in my search to find a stainless gyuto that can give me 90% of the performance of my Shig without the carbon steel hassle, I've tried: Ginga, Kobayashi Seikon Dojo, Itinomonn, Sakai Yusuke, Sakai Takayuki hammered, older Hiromoto AS, and Kochi. Of those I kept the Kochi and it's been a great knife. My only complaint is that the rear 1/3 of the blade steers a bit in thick veges like potatoes. The front 1/3 is excellent, as good as my Shig and great for tip chopping (which is the reason why I kept it over the Itinomonn which was just a squidge thicker near the tip, although the back half was thinner and didn't steer). The shinogi of the Kochi is about 3/4" at the tip less than 5/8" at the heel and I really feel if they could keep that bevel in the back half nearer 3/4" it would just about as perfect a performing gyuto as you could get.

    Anyway I tried two new knives today: Kohetsu Nashiji (blue #2 core) and Kohetsu SLD. Both are $130 and I figured if the grind was good they would be a fantastic deal. Edge OOTB was very good but I put an edge on them anyway so it would be apples to apples versus the Kochi. The SLD was noticeably more work, so I'm guessing edge retention would be quite good. Fit and finish was good for the price. I didn't think these were from the same shop but the blades are ground very similarly so I'm thinking they may just be from the same hands.

    [​IMG]

    Just feeling the blades there is some convexing of the Kohetsu's, while the Kochi is flat. The spine of the Kohetsu's is just slight bit thicker. I took some measurements with a caliper at 1/2" from the edge at three places: 1" from the heel, 1" from the tip, and midpoint.

    [​IMG]

    Given the SLD was thinnest here I expected pretty tough competition for the Kochi. Cut up some onions, potatoes and carrots. When tip chopping the Kochi was still king, just slides through the veges. The kohetsu's both found resistance once the blade sunk in a bit - maybe 1/4" or so. In the middle and back half of the blade it was similar, Kochi slides through easier (but steers in the back), while the Kohetsu both found some resistance about half way up the blade. The SLD did a bit better than Nashiji with it's more polished finish. No steering that I could tell. I don't really like the oval handles of the Kohetsu (I prefer D), but that is just preference thing, they otherwise weren't bad and when wet I found them grippy like my Shig, and I like that.

    I was little surprised by the difference in performance given my measurements so i took a few more to understand. Just behind the blade about 1/4" the Kochi is thinnest by maybe .005" being as it has no convexing. As shown above at 1/2" from the edge the Kohetsu is thinner everywhere but the tip. But by about 1" from the edge they reached the natural thickness of the blade and the Kochi was thinner here too, though by not more than .01".

    So the Kochi isn't going anywhere in my kitchen, but the real question is how do these Kohetsu compare to other sub $200 knives? For me grind is everything and these are pretty good. Not as good as Tanaka blue's but then that is a carbon blade. I'd like to compare them against a Tanaka ginsan since the grind on those isn't quite the same as the blue blades - everyone wants to show off the rough finish on the upper blade and it seems like this always results in a thicker blade in the middle. The Kohetsu are worlds better than the Sakai Takayuki hammered, older Hiromoto AS, or Kobayashi. For push slicing the lasers (Ginga, SY) are better, but the Kohetsu have the weight for chopping while the laser don't. With the smoother finish, what feels like more durable steel, and a slightly heavier blade (just by feel), I think the SLD version is the Kohetsu to get.

    Anyway hope this review is helpful. I'd like to compare them to some other comparably priced gyutos if anyone is interested in swapping. Especially a Tanaka Ginsan.
     
  2. Dec 28, 2018 #2

    deskjockey

    deskjockey

    deskjockey

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    How did the Kohetsu SLD work out? Was it a keeper? Did you find something better in a stainless knife?

    TIA!
     
  3. Jan 1, 2019 #3

    uc357

    uc357

    uc357

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    The Kohetsu Nashiji seems to be the same as Tadafusa, Fujimoto and Blue Moon.
    JCK sell the Blue Moon gyuto for around $100.00 us$
     
  4. Jan 1, 2019 #4
    The grind on a new Kochi is gently concave (at least that was the case on my K-tip 180 Santoku. This allows for a blade that is crazy thin blade behind the edge, but will sharpen out eventually (the knife will remain beautifully thin behind the edge if maintained properly).

    When you say that the knife is steering at the heel - you feel it is because simply of the thickness of the grind or do you find that your Kochi is ground asymmetrically?

    Just a note - it would be much easier to compare to other knives of the measurements you provided were in metric units as that is what most people use around here when it comes to knives.
     
  5. Jan 1, 2019 #5

    mikaelsan

    mikaelsan

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    As for the the kohetsus as far as I could find out there is nothing that suggests that they are not the same as the tadafusas. I've got the nashiji 210 and the sld version of the nakiri.
    I personally love what they are doing at the tadafusa factory, but I don't think the knives are for everyone.

    The nashiji does, as the review suggest, not come with the amount of distal taper that a lot of people love, at least not when you get past the heel area. The grind is slightly concave, and is a middle of the road in terms of thickness, it's definitely not a laser, but nor is it a true horsie, I personally like the middle ground grind, I like how it does on most ingredients, maybe except things like large root vegetables. It's a knife that would be really nice for my personal taste and needs for a one stop knife, but there is something very unexciting about it, and though it's my only real 210 I hardly ever reach for it anymore.

    The SLD I really like, it's plenty thin, I don't know about the gyuto, but the nakiri has almost no distal taper at all, don't know how this translates to the gyuto. This is my favourite trait of the knife, as I really prefer my nakiris like that, with what it does to the balance of the knife. The next thing about it is that is truly thin, this is the knife I reach for when I'm doing things like root vegetables, i did thin it but only to remove some of the concavity of the grind and change the surface finish. The last very relevant thing to consider is that out of the box, this glossy but somehow not that mirror esque finish, is very sticky, roughing up that finish with my akamusa helped greatly. This is not the kind of knife I reach for when dealing with food release intensive foods like potatoes, but for for most other things I love using it.

    Ht should be reputable, but not too notch, I like the blue steel significantly better then the SLD, I know it's a carbon compared with a stainless, mostly thinking about how the edge detiorates, but still.

    Hope that helps if your still looking at the SLD
     
    deskjockey likes this.
  6. Jan 10, 2019 #6

    deskjockey

    deskjockey

    deskjockey

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    Thanks!
     
  7. Jan 13, 2019 #7

    inferno

    inferno

    inferno

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    for what its worth i had the blue moon santoku. it was really nice. got sharp as hell and easy to grind. kept a good edge. i guess 62hrs or so. not smeary at all on the stones.
    I put a ziricote/olive handle on it and gave it to my brother. but it was just as good as any blue 2/ blue super knife i have regarding max sharpness and edge retention.
     

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