Tichet

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ChefP

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Hi, Recently aquired a Tichet chef knife,12 1/4" blade, 17 1/4 total, Does anybody have info on Tichet?,Knife is stamped Paris with 2 lions, I would like to find out how old the knife is and any other info, I will post pics as soon as moderators alow.
 

Benuser

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Carbon steel? Pix would help a lot. Send a link to an image host. Some retailers had their name engraved.
 

McMan

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Hard to tell without pics...
Some of those old Tichets are nice--as good as old sabatiers but imported much less. (Sabatier Two Lions are junk though.)
Check the back side of the bolster (where your finger would touch) to see if it is stamped "YANIP". This was a hallmark used on some of the older Tichet.
 

Benuser

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I found 17 registrations of two lions by Thiers makers between 1882 and 1973. So we really need a bit more information. No Tichet in Thiers though.
 

Benuser

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So there's been a knife maker Tichet in Paris. Let's look further.
 

ChefP

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Any thoughts on an age, the bolster is stamped.
 

Benuser

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This is a typical Nogent or rat-tail construction. The French have produced it until the sixties, in other countries the full tang with rivets was introduced much earlier.
Advantage of the Nogent: the handle is very light, very comfortable and can easily be replaced. Yes, it is likely to break. No big deal in those years. Ebony was cheap, labour as well.
The blade, fingerguard and tail are made of one piece of steel. A ferrule is added, often from alpaca Aka nickel-silver or German silver.
http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/14035-my-first-nogent-handle
Your knife doesn't look too bad, but the profile has suffered from a lot of steeling. The tip has been rounded and moved far too high to be effective. Can easily be corrected but will cost a bit of the blade's length.
 

ChefP

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This is a typical Nogent or rat-tail construction. The French have produced it until the sixties, in other countries the full tang with rivets was introduced much earlier.
Advantage of the Nogent: the handle is very light, very comfortable and can easily be replaced. Yes, it is likely to break. No big deal in those years. Ebony was cheap, labour as well.
The blade, fingerguard and tail are made of one piece of steel. A ferrule is added, often from alpaca Aka nickel-silver or German silver.
http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/14035-my-first-nogent-handle
Your knife doesn't look too bad, but the profile has suffered from a lot of steeling. The tip has been rounded and moved far too high to be effective. Can easily be corrected but will cost a bit of the blade's length.
Suffered from alot of steeling? what suffering or damage are you refering to? steeling to true the knifes edge? please explain?
 

Benuser

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Suffered from alot of steeling? what suffering or damage are you refering to? steeling to true the knifes edge? please explain?
Steeling is a very common old maintenance method, especially with soft blades. Some call it truing, or honing, the edge. What happens is that the edge got rebuild from fatigued steel. I believe it better got abraded, but that is another discussion. Just be aware that quite often some blade steel has to get abraded before you reach the steel that takes and holds a decent edge.
In the case of your knife the profile is very different from what is common with French blades of that époque. The tip is far too high, and heavily rounded. Can be due to very poor sharpening, but much more likely is use of excessive pressure when steeling.
 
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