Tipo 00 pizza dough

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chefwp

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I recently transcribed this recipe for a work colleague. For you pie lovers, if you have never tried using Italian Tipo 00 flour for your dough I implore you to give it a try. I think it makes the perfect texture. Here is my recipe, which is fairly 'no knead,' I just stir it up in a bowl and them maybe turn and press it with my hands just a few times (barely knead?)


Tipo 00 pizza dough
  • 525 grams (about 3 1/2 cups) tipo 00 flour (Italian flour, it's around)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons of fine sea salt
  • 8 g instant yeast (about 2 teaspoons)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/4 cup of warm water (shoot for just under 120 degrees)
This is a pretty much a no-knead recipe that after rising should be refrigerated for a day or two to develop beautiful flavors through fermentation
  • -mix the sugar with cool tap water and put in the microwave for about a minute, stir to melt the sugar. shooting for around just under 120 degrees or you might kill our little buddies (yeast).
  • -once the water is the right temp, use a tiny whisk or fork to mix in the yeast. At this juncture I like to wait about 10 minutes to hopefully observe the yeast consuming the sugar and farting out gas galore, the mixture should get frothy on top. If this is the case, your yeast is alive and ready to party, if not, time to go buy some more yeast
  • -while waiting on all the yeast flatulence, in a medium size mixing bowl, gently whisk together the flour and salt. In another non-reactive mixing bowl (glass perhaps), lightly oil it with olive oil, using your fingers to coat the entire interior lightly.
  • -whisk in the 2 Tbs of olive oil into the yeasty water, then dump it into the flour mixture. With a sturdy wooden spoon or sturdy spatula, mix it all up, scraping the sides until you have nice wet ball of dough.
  • -transfer the dough to the oiled bowl, cover it with plastic and put a few holes in the plastic with something like a paring knife.
  • -sit it in a warm spot to rise for about 1 1/2 hours. It should about double in size, then move it to the frig to relax overnight.
This recipe makes 4 nice sized personal pizzas or 2 decent sized family pies.
Whatever size you choose, shape the disks and press them out with your fingers into nice rounds on a lightly floured surface. If you have patience completely shape the pie to your desired thickness in that manner, or if are an impatient f'er like me, finish with a floured rolling pin (ap flour is ok to use for this part). also when you are pressing it out on your surface, apply sprinkings of flour as needed if things get sticky. Make sure the bottom feels dry before transferring it to a peel if you are using one, if it is not, rub some flour on until it feels dry. Happy cooking.

and remember, any size pizza can be a personal pizza if you believe in yourself! :chef:

misc pizza making notes:
  • after pressing out your dough, move it to a pizza peel that has been lightly dusted with corn flour and apply your toppings there to transfer to the oven stone, unless you are just using a pan
  • I like to finish them once out of the oven with the North African spice mixture, Za'atar, crushed red pepper, and freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
pizza1.jpg

pizza2.jpg

pizza3.jpg

pizza4.jpg
 
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DavidPF

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Note that there are different kinds of 00 flour, with different protein levels - make sure you're actually getting the one you want. (Most of the time they make it obvious by putting "for pizza" on the label.)
 

chefwp

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Note that there are different kinds of 00 flour, with different protein levels - make sure you're actually getting the one you want. (Most of the time they make it obvious by putting "for pizza" on the label.)
good point, sometimes they also mention something like "formulated for lower temp home ovens"
 

MarcelNL

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My suggestion is to simply go find Caputo Cuoco flour, in my experience (now making pizza for like 30 years) it's the best for long proofing (think anywhere between 24 and 48 hours at approx 8-10'C). Don't forget to take the dough out of the fridge approx. 7-8 hrs prior to baking, divide into individual balls and cover with a damp cloth to allow them to recover from the cold.

BTW if you go for long proofing bring the yeast way content down or the dough grows out of the fridge (don't ask how I know), I never use oil in the dough anymore since I discovered Caputo, YMMV. Salt content can be used to tweak proofing according to time available and temperature, salt is the 'brakes'.

What works well for me is to use semolina for stretching, no rolling pins please... everything to preserve the corniccioli of the pizza.

Pizzamaking.com is a great resource for all kinds of recipe's and oven mods...( my favorite is a modded Ferrari 3G with two coils on top. Do try and find an oven that gets up to 350-400'C
 

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MarcelNL

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I have a small electric 'Ferrari3G" Pizza oven for in house and a 'project' wood fired oven for outside (duh ;-) ), main problem for the wood fired oven is that the original design calls for a burning chamber below the pizza making the smoke passing the pizza and all heat coming from below. A 5mm steel plate get red glowing hot, it reaches 500'C and now I'm going to try fire up the upper chamber...more experiments to come once the whether gets better.
 

chefwp

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I have a small electric 'Ferrari3G" Pizza oven for in house and a 'project' wood fired oven for outside (duh ;-) ), main problem for the wood fired oven is that the original design calls for a burning chamber below the pizza making the smoke passing the pizza and all heat coming from below. A 5mm steel plate get red glowing hot, it reaches 500'C and now I'm going to try fire up the upper chamber...more experiments to come once the whether gets better.
Nice, I keep threatening to build a wood fired oven out front, one day...
 

MarcelNL

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it was a spur of the moment discount purchase, at one of the cheap-ass German supermarkets, just to see what gives.
More work is needed, but I have good hopes in getting there. Building a brick, or clay oven is the alternative but that takes a lot of space and effort...too much for 3-6 Pizza's every couple of weeks, well that is...until now.
 

chefwp

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My suggestion is to simply go find Caputo Cuoco flour, in my experience (now making pizza for like 30 years) it's the best for long proofing (think anywhere between 24 and 48 hours at approx 8-10'C). Don't forget to take the dough out of the fridge approx. 7-8 hrs prior to baking, divide into individual balls and cover with a damp cloth to allow them to recover from the cold.

BTW if you go for long proofing bring the yeast way content down or the dough grows out of the fridge (don't ask how I know), I never use oil in the dough anymore since I discovered Caputo, YMMV. Salt content can be used to tweak proofing according to time available and temperature, salt is the 'brakes'.

What works well for me is to use semolina for stretching, no rolling pins please... everything to preserve the corniccioli of the pizza.

Pizzamaking.com is a great resource for all kinds of recipe's and oven mods...( my favorite is a modded Ferrari 3G with two coils on top. Do try and find an oven that gets up to 350-400'C
That sounds like great advice. I may have to try your super long proof. How much would you dial back my yeast if I did 24 hours (currently at 8g for a 1.5 hr proof)? Have you ever used a light flat lager instead of water to amplify those fermenty flavors? I've been meaning to try that. I don't think the small amount of oil really effects the structure of the dough and that it is included more for flavor, but you may know better than me. Here is the flour I've been using for a long time.
tipo00.jpg
 

ian

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Fwiw, I don’t think a super hot oven is necessary for good pizza unless you’re cranking them out super fast, or want a super super tender Neapolitan feel. I’ve made pizzas in my BGE at 800-900 F and pizzas in my oven at 550 F and they are similarly tasty. The oven’s also less finicky and much less work. The main difference is that they take longer to cook.

My go to recipe nowadays is the Overnight Levain Pizza Dough from FWSY.
 

chefwp

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Fwiw, I don’t think a super hot oven is necessary for good pizza unless you’re cranking them out super fast, or want a super super tender Neapolitan feel. I’ve made pizzas in my BGE at 800-900 F and pizzas in my oven at 550 F and they are similarly tasty. The oven’s also less finicky and much less work. The main difference is that they take longer to cook.

My go to recipe nowadays is the Overnight Levain Pizza Dough from FWSY.
I do 450 with a stone, works well enough, not to brag, but I've never had a better pizza. That just probably means I need to get out more... :rolleyes:
 

MarcelNL

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wow, Caputo already! All their formulations differ ever so slightly but I have not yet come across one that I hated...

If it works for you I's stick with that, I looked at the manufacturer site and could not find it, it probably is one of their flours under a different name for the US.

I never tried lager, should work :) I typically drink mine when making the pizza :p

lowering yeast all comes down to the target proofing temperature and duration, I suggest you read up on pizzamaking forum, where they also sport a dough calculator and have recipes catering for the dough of all styles of pizza. I usually wing the amounts, recently I used a starter dough (not sourdough) and was able to use even less yeast (simply because it reproduces itself).

Here an example,
10 tot 12 pizza’s

1 liter water
1,8 kilo 00-flour of W280 or better, for example the Caputo Cuoco
55 gram salt(that is steep, I use WAY less salt, more like half of this)
1,5 gram fresh yeast and I cheat by adding a little 'dead' sourdough that Caputo sells for flavor.

Simply the usual process up to 20-30-40 min fermentation, then ball it up and stick into the fridge at approx. 5 'C to proof for like 24 hrs, take it out of the fridge early enough to warm up, I make portion size balls at that point. (like 5-6 hrs prior to baking).

In my experience the longer proof the more subtle flavor nuances the dough produces.
About heat, I am aiming for Neapolitan Pizza so for me high heat is definitely better, crunchy thin with smooth inside and nice leaparding on the cornicciola.
 
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KJDedge

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In the top recipe is it really 1/12 of a teaspoon sugar?
 

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