Tipped knife

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

TM001

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2020
Messages
86
Reaction score
87
Location
Savannah, GA
I have tipped two knives in the last month (clumsy). One I caught on a wood cabinet and one dropped in sink while drying. Fortunately only a few mm of damage.

I have already fixed them (tuned out better than I expected but since I seem to have developed a bad habit, can anyone recommend a good video showing fixing a tipped knife. Does JKI have one? I watched ones from Sharp Knife Shop and Korin.

Also my Toyama Gyuto now has some scratches near the new tip that does not match rest of knife finish and the spine needs to be eased. What is used to ease the spine, stone/sandpaper and does anyone know what grit this knife is finished to so I can try and match. Can I do this with wet/dry sandpaper as I do not have any natural stones or finger stones.
 

McMan

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
2,134
Reaction score
2,049
The Korin video is good but suggests grinding down from the spine as well as up from the tip. Others will suggest to grind down from just the spine (if possible). This maintains the edge geometry. Grinding down from the spine and up from the edge creates a new edge geometry (which isn't always a bad thing depending on what the chip looked like). My preference is to grind down from the spine.
Keep in mind that you'll also need to thin out the new tip regardless of how you made it (see JKI video on thinning). This will leave even more scratches to the finish. To ease the spine you can either use stones or a strip of sandpaper on the spine in a shoe-shine motion (hold the knife in book so just the tip sticks out).
It's not going to be possible to mimic the original finish on the repaired area. (Toyama has that sandblasted kasumi band). Any sandpaper you use in that area will stick out because the scratch pattern is different from the sandblast. Still, you could try to blend it in with a progression of wet/dry sandpaper, which could get rid of some of the deeper scratches.

TLDR--grind from the spine down, thin, live with the scratches :)

Also, pic?
 
Last edited:

TM001

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2020
Messages
86
Reaction score
87
Location
Savannah, GA
To ease the spine you can either use stones or a strip of sandpaper on the spine in a shoe-shine motion (hold the knife in book so just the tip sticks out).

TLDR--grind from the spine down, thin, live with the scratches :)

Also, pic?
I thought that might be the case about the finish.

What grit to ease the spine?
 

McMan

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
2,134
Reaction score
2,049
220-320-400-500 progression

one trick is to knock off the spine edges on the sides of the stone. Then the sandpaper is more about blending/smoothing.
 

tostadas

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
1,060
Reaction score
1,285
Location
California
I thought that might be the case about the finish.

What grit to ease the spine?
I use 120-220-400-800. Thats plenty smooth for all practical purposes. I generally like to continue to 1500 and 2500 after to get near mirror for spine and choils.

For the rough shaping on the 120, it sometimes helps to lay the paper flat on a stone and put the knife on top. That way you dont have to mess with trying to hold both the knife and sandpaper. Also mask off the parts of the knife outside of where you plan on easing to reduce risk of stray scuffs
 

TM001

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2020
Messages
86
Reaction score
87
Location
Savannah, GA
Thanks for all the easing advice. I have the sandpaper to do that.

Here is the tip after I repaired it. Did not take before pic. Did almost all the remove from the spine side so I think the edge profile is about the same as before. It has not been thinned after the fix. I don't think the scratches from the work show up well in the pic.

Turned out better than I thought it would but the tip is not quite as pointy as it was.
 

Attachments

Walla

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2017
Messages
155
Reaction score
117
How much of the tip was affected...?

Take care

Jeff
 

Walla

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2017
Messages
155
Reaction score
117
If it's only a couple of millimeters... don't know if I'd worry too much about thinning it... that's just me...I have mostly working knives..and they see all kinds of injuries...

It's ultimately up to you.

Take care

Jeff
 

jwthaparc

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2020
Messages
676
Reaction score
605
Location
Houston

You can search their livestreams that have naoto. If you need a more in depth tutorial. They will show the whole process live.
 

TM001

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2020
Messages
86
Reaction score
87
Location
Savannah, GA
Thank you all for the help. I eased the spine this evening with a coarse oil stone followed by aluminum oxide stone and 500-800 wet dry. Feels about the same as the original.

Since I did almost all the removal from spine side i did not thin the tip although it might need some more work.

Thank you again for the videos and advice, fix turned out pretty good.
 
Top