Tough Lessons

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Learned a tough lesson with my new TF while cutting the top off of a bulb of garlic. I’ve done this hundreds of times without a problem. But the dry center core/stem was just too hard and took a little nick out of the edge.

Fortunately, I was able to clean it up on the stones. I was a little upset with myself at first and wasn’t going to look at it for a couple of days. But after my wife went to bed I couldn’t stop myself. It was actually rather therapeutic and in just a few minutes all was good again.
9983B7E7-6E68-4E68-AE8B-4E7083F82892.jpeg


I started on the 400 with a very light touch until the edge was restored. Then did some countdown strokes on the 1000. Finished with stropping on the 6000.
 
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Good for you for setting things right. Not being a smartass at all, but what was the lesson for you? Serious question.
Don’t try to force the blade or cut into something that might have an obstruction. I thought that because it wasn’t a bone and simply part of a garlic bulb that it would just go right through.

I’m sure I have a few bad habits to break from using my old Dexter and Cutco knives. But even with those I was always careful to never scrape the blade on the board.

I’m learning…
 
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Don’t try to force the blade or cut into something that might have an obstruction. I thought that because it wasn’t a bone and simply part of a garlic bulb that it would just go right through.

I’m sure I have a few bad habits to break from using my old Dexter and Cutco knives. But even with those I was always careful to never scrape the blade on the board.

I’m learning…

That's fair, understandable and may be right. But there may be another lesson.

The original edges can often be quite fragile. Ridding the knife of that fragile steel may prevent such incidents going forward. Within limits of course.

Only time will tell in this specific instance but it is worth considering and keeping in mind.
 
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That's fair, understandable and may be right. But there may be another lesson.

The original edges can often be quite fragile. Ridding the knife of that fragile steel may prevent such incidents going forward. Within limits of course.

Only time will tell in this specific instance but it is worth considering and keeping in mind.
Thanks. I really like the knife and want to keep using it. We will see how the new edge works when I get back from vacation. Gonna get out of this winter wonderland for a bit.
 

KingShapton

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View attachment 165096

I started on the 400 with a very light touch until the edge was restored. Then did some countdown strokes on the 1000. Finished with stropping on the 6000.

I'm maybe a little confused now - but the stones and the associated boxes in your picture look like Shapton Pro 320/1000/5000?!
 
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Hard parmesan, squash, anywhere around bone and cracklings are a few of the others that I have seen some people have trouble with cutting and blade damage. This is compounded with very acute angles. TF is often sharpened at acute angles because they are known as blades that can handle those angles (good technique, right product).

I received a TF that was virtually new. The first owner had thinned it out of the box and used it sparingly. It slid through product beautifully until it met some parm. I have been using fine knives for years and never had an issue. The ding was small and limited because I knew the danger with that product and I was concerned with such a thin edge. Is till had something to fix.

All this is to say- sorry it happened, glad you fixed it. If you maintain a thin edge, enjoy it on soft product. If you need to hack through something questionable grab one of the sturdy knives.
 

Corradobrit1

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Did this happen to a factory edge? TF's, as well as other makers who temper steel to a high hardness, are prone to this problem. Its happened to a Kato I owned and to a lesser degree (microchipping) a TF Mab. I now make it a habit to refine the factory edge on stones before cutting anything harder than a tomato. No problems after that even with ultra acute grinds on Denka's.
 
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Did this happen to a factory edge? TF's, as well as other makers who temper steel to a high hardness, are prone to this problem. Its happened to a Kato I owned and to a lesser degree (microchipping) a TF Mab. I now make it a habit to refine the factory edge on stones before cutting anything harder than a tomato. No problems after that even with ultra acute grinds on Denka's.
As far as I know it was factory original. I bought it from another member and trust that it was new, like he said.
 
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As far as I know it was factory original. I bought it from another member and trust that it was new, like he said.
100% factory edge.
Sorry it happened. I've chipped a few nice knives, and it always pisses me off. Kind of like some times I injured myself doing something risky and only realized it too late. I've also chipped a knife on a whole garlic bulb.
Good for you to fix it, I think that's the best way to move on. Hopefully you learned something about the knife and cutting technique so that you can avoid things like that in the future (or incur less damage). And now the knife is really yours. (It will be even more yours when you draw your own blood . . .)
As Corradobrit said, chipping on factory edges, particularly TFs, is something that happens, and I'll defer to him as more knowledgeable about it.
Hope you are happy with the performance with your upgrade!
 
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100% factory edge.
Sorry it happened. I've chipped a few nice knives, and it always pisses me off. Kind of like some times I injured myself doing something risky and only realized it too late. I've also chipped a knife on a whole garlic bulb.
Good for you to fix it, I think that's the best way to move on. Hopefully you learned something about the knife and cutting technique so that you can avoid things like that in the future (or incur less damage). And now the knife is really yours. (It will be even more yours when you draw your own blood . . .)
As Corradobrit said, chipping on factory edges, particularly TFs, is something that happens, and I'll defer to him as more knowledgeable about it.
Hope you are happy with the performance with your upgrade!
Oh I’m very happy. I didn’t tag you because I didn’t want anyone to think I was implicating you in any way. It was 100% my fault.

The knife is beautiful and I have no reason to doubt your word. In fact, the only scratches are the ones I put there when I let the angle get a little too low.

I look forward to many enjoyable cuts with this knife. :)
 

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I would have liked to see some pictures of the knife. Before and after repair would be great, but I guess a little difficult if you didn't take any before.
 

Kiru

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Learned a tough lesson with my new TF while cutting the top off of a bulb of garlic. I’ve done this hundreds of times without a problem. But the dry center core/stem was just too hard and took a little nick out of the edge.

Fortunately, I was able to clean it up on the stones. I was a little upset with myself at first and wasn’t going to look at it for a couple of days. But after my wife went to bed I couldn’t stop myself. It was actually rather therapeutic and in just a few minutes all was good again.
View attachment 165096

I started on the 400 with a very light touch until the edge was restored. Then did some countdown strokes on the 1000. Finished with stropping on the 6000.
Man, I can relate to the part "when wife went to bed I couldn't stop myself", gf often walks out of the bedroom and sees me standing at the middle of the dining room cutting tissue paper or sharpening at 1am..... How can I sleep at night knowing my knife has a little chip or not toothy enough? I can't

But anyways, good for you for fixing it!
 
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I would have liked to see some pictures of the knife. Before and after repair would be great, but I guess a little difficult if you didn't take any before.
I was testing out a different knife tonight and remembered that I promised a pic. So here’s a few shots.
090B185F-461E-49AE-BF59-4C483FF4B247.jpeg

81102961-24E7-4202-89F2-40629211CB18.jpeg

598A5FC9-B769-4074-B14D-6ED1D1AF2E53.jpeg

F22862F0-DC75-4C7D-AEC5-8B5C729B0535.jpeg

The affected area was about 2-3” from the tip. I’m fairly well pleased with how easy it was to fix and have zero complaints about its performance. I’m sure I have more to learn and look forward to many happy years with this knife.
 

ModRQC

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You might be right. I think they just say “coarse”, “medium”, and “fine”. I’m simply relying on my memory from the description when I bought them.

Oh he's definitely right. Although color of the blue stone itself could easily be misconstrued as an SP1500, I think the box doesn't lie.

Piquing my interest is where did you buy these that had such a poor description?

And obviously I'm burning to tell you these usually come with not only a clear plastic liner doubled with a laminated paper wraparound stating the grit, but also that the original stamp on each stones specifies the grit as well.
 
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Oh he's definitely right. Although color of the blue stone itself could easily be misconstrued as an SP1500, I think the box doesn't lie.

Piquing my interest is where did you buy these that had such a poor description?

And obviously I'm burning to tell you these usually come with not only a clear plastic liner doubled with a laminated paper wraparound stating the grit, but also that the original stamp on each stones specifies the grit as well.

I can’t remember where I bought them from. They may have even been from multiple vendors. Amazon may have been one, but I can’t remember if it was one or two. I was in a buying frenzy and all the packaging is long gone. I’m sure I read them and thought I could remember what they were, but such is not the case. As it is, they are coarse, medium, and fine. Or something like that.
 
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