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Trouble with 2000 grit

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Logan

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Hi, so I can get a knife almost push cutting sharp on a so called 400 grit diamond stone and barely push cutting on a so called 600 grit which seems way finer than the 400 and I can get barely to push cutting typing paper and slicing it pretty well. Even after deburring and doing descending strokes and then alternating strokes on the Shapton Pro 2000 the knife gets worse at cutting paper, contrary to every video I have seen and likely pretty much the whole sharpening community, even if I go light. A person in the business says to sharpen at 320, go to the 2000 with descending strokes and after that go to a leather stop which I guess is supposed to bring out the benefit of the 2000. He doesn't believe a 1000 is much different than a 2000?? I'm thinking of trying to get rid of the 2000, getting an 8 inch stone at 320-400, maybe an 800 to 1000 and then a strop. Anyhow I'm very disappointed in my results with such a well thought of stone. I just do basic crude cutting for every day food but it would be nice to easily push cut onions with little resistance and have a quick way to get back a good edge every day. Even like a 1200 ceramic rod was better than the 2000 Shapton. I had a rod I liked but lost it and I tried 2 others that were seemingly not as good but they still made the edge sharper after the 600 grit. What to do? I'll only have moderately priced stainless knives. Thanks
 

JDC

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Sometimes grit doesn't reflect the edge it produces: scienceofsharp
But, in your case a 600 -> SP 2000 should be no problem push cutting after deburring.

I'm not sure about your skill level, but a lot of things you can look into: angle stability, pressure, flatness of stones, stroke directions, etc.

Are you using edge trailing strokes or edge leading? And did you flatten your stones before sharpening?
 

FishmanDE

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I have the same issue (@JDC) but going from 1k to 6k. I personally have to be cognizant that I'm taking my time and really extra focusing on the angle. Not saying that's your issue, just saying its a common one
 

JDC

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I have the same issue (@JDC) but going from 1k to 6k. I personally have to be cognizant that I'm taking my time and really extra focusing on the angle. Not saying that's your issue, just saying its a common one
I see, is your 6k a soft stone? Also were you doing edge trailing or leading?
 

FishmanDE

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I see, is your 6k a soft stone? Also were you doing edge trailing or leading?
I believe harder? King 6k. And I was doing back and forth, but have since switched to trailing exclusively. My rushing the sharpening process has been well documented in a few threads lol.
 

JDC

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I believe harder? King 6k. And I was doing back and forth, but have since switched to trailing exclusively. My rushing the sharpening process has been well documented in a few threads lol.
King 6k is indeed hard. It is one of my first stones, and it's easier than king 8k to obtain a sharp edge.

Just pulled it out and did a quick, dirty sharpening jumping from shapton pro 1k.

Out of 1k the white 2 knife could already push cut, with some care. After a few strokes on the 6k, it push cut letter paper with ease.

The better you polish your edge, the better it push cuts paper. This requires a properly formed apex, and a proper deburring process.

The apex need to be narrow without being rounded. Sometimes a light micro-beveling can better form the apex, and this process also helps with deburring (don't be afraid of lifting up the angle).


Also you can search about the Kippington method.

Edge leading strokes suppress the burr formation, that's what I use to achieve push cutting without stropping.

 
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