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MattPike4President

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It'd have to be a really damn good steakhouse for me to be interested. I don't eat out a lot, and when I do its food I don't want to or won't do as well making for myself. I know how to cook a steak and make mashed potatoes as well and likely far better than any steakhouse I can afford.
 
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steak houses are a big part of my NYC experience—worked across the street from Les Halles (of Bourdain fame) in the 90s,
Les Halles is/was not really a steak house, although the Tartare trolley was quite the trip. Bourdain's Les Halles cookbook is terrific; some earlier posts recommended Pat Wells's Bistro Cooking; Bourdain's is better IMHO. Also Keller's Bouchon is the (ahem) cat's cookies.
 
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Big fan of the 48 hour sous vide short ribs. It's also wonderful for doing a braised chashu. I hardly cook a steak any other way than sous vide at the moment. Super convenient on weeknights for set it and forget it when I'm busy doing other things.
 

DitmasPork

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Les Halles is/was not really a steak house, although the Tartare trolley was quite the trip. Bourdain's Les Halles cookbook is terrific; some earlier posts recommended Pat Wells's Bistro Cooking; Bourdain's is better IMHO. Also Keller's Bouchon is the (ahem) cat's cookies.
Les Halles didn’t fit the mold of the classic American Steakhouse—but identified as a steak house, nearly everyone ordered steaks, the wait staff called it a steak house—it was known for steaks more than anything else. I like his Les Halles cookbook, though bought it long after he’d left, and the restaurant lost its coziness becoming touristy and corporate. Also loved BLT steak, another French inspired steak house, with enough of a varied menu to appease non-red meat eaters.
 

spaceconvoy

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Right, and you don’t have the moral quandary of murdering likely intelligent critters to enjoy it.
If that was a real concern then vegetarianism would be the only moral option

Let's be real, this isn't about murdering an animal that can solve spatial problems because the world would be impoverished without their genius. It's about causing pain and suffering in a creature with the capacity for foresight, who experiences not only immediate sensory pain but cognitive terror at its approach. If you truly cared about that, you would stop eating meat and fish entirely

People set arbitrary limits on what level of animal 'intelligence' is acceptable to kill, not because it solves a moral quandary but to avoid grappling with that quandary

I still eat meat though 😛
 

DitmasPork

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It'd have to be a really damn good steakhouse for me to be interested. I don't eat out a lot, and when I do its food I don't want to or won't do as well making for myself. I know how to cook a steak and make mashed potatoes as well and likely far better than any steakhouse I can afford.

For me—whether or not I can cook better food than what's served up in a restaurant, has little to do with deciding to eat out. That form of competitiveness is not in my nature.

Sure, I can cut up a platter of sashimi that it fresher, better, than a lot of sushi joints, at a fraction of the cost—but I enjoy eating at sushi bars.

Food and how it’s made is important—but equally important is all the creative work that's gone into the restaurant, like interior design, lighting, branding, menu design, FOH outfits, plating, etc.

Being an urbanite, eating at restaurants is a way of life, as for many NYC dwellers. I'm a people person; love the buzz and scene of a bustling restaurant; dig the hype stirred up by food critics; appreciate the work, and like to support pro cooks, even forgiving the occasional kitchen missteps; enjoy engaging with the FOH. Yeah, and judging food/service, etc., is a time honored NYC sport.

When going to a steakhouse that I've not gone to before—I've really no idea whether it'll be sublime, mediocre, or disappointing—which is akin to buying gyutos, I don't know if I'll jive with it until I use it.
 

enrico

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Not all styles in all sizes. What actual use cases have you executed which were "inferior and lame"?
First, look what thread you are posting in. No need to get the shorts in a bunch over my statement but I'll engage a little.

Sous vide is inferior, I stand by that. After working in many places and seeing a TON of different cuts/proteins like pork, veal, beef, lamb, fish, octopus, etc... I can honestly say this. It's cool to do it at home if that what you're into but IMO and many chefs I've worked with/for, agree with my sediment. The only time the circulator comes out is if I need to stuff a cut and need the protein to set.

Can't beat a properly braised piece of meat, but you do you.
 
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I don't drag out the sous vide gear much. That's more because of a personal preference for the kinds of cooking that are very hands-on, visceral, than because I have enough experience with it to properly affirm or reject.

The one use that makes me really glad I have it is corned beef. I got really tired of half the flavor leeching out into the simmering water, not to mention the connective juices that bind the brisket together. Using sous vide, no more stringy, bland corned beef.
 

enrico

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It’s pretty nice for bulk poached eggs. Much nicer when doing eggs Benedict for a group vs the silliness of sitting over a pot of warm water 1-2 at a time
Maybe I’m just slow, but are saying soft boil?
 

enrico

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He never mentioned shell on. Did mention poached though. So I'd assume, since he didn't specifically say it, he meant shell off. Since that's normal for poached eggs.
Yeah that was my question. How is it easier than doing it the normal way over a pot of water.
 
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