Unpopular opinions

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
This just seems arbitrary to me. Is it perhaps a cultural thing?
Also sushi would be my counterpoint.

Meat closer to the bone generally has more flavor. Think dark meat and wings with chicken, t-bones and ribeye vs filet mignon, baby back ribs vs pork chop, short ribs. etc.

There’s a lot of exceptions, like brisket and pork belly but I think those run into another rule that fatty and hard-working tough cuts also taste pretty great when cooked properly.

And also I challenge your nigiri sushi with a steaming hot hamachi kama fresh off the grill.
 
I just did a Google image search for carnitas estilo Michoacan and seeing plenty of bones in there, just sayin'! I've done both because sometimes just buying a boneless shoulder is most practical cooking for a small family, but given my druthers I like bone-in for carnitas. I love how in Mexico the carnitas stands often have a variety of cuts on offer, one of my favorites was rib carnitas.
My favorite taqueria in Tucson did their stewed chicken by just throwing the whole plucked birds into a giant pot and letting it roll all day. Might get a bone now and then but I'll tell ya, small price to pay for that level of flavor!
 
Firstly, I love NYC, one of the greatest cities to live, best food city (chefs/restaurants), best culture/arts city, dig the people, been here decades.
However, during the past decade there’s been subway pushing trend, Asian hate violence, etc. But it’s not as bad here as the in other cities—me and my wife still feel safe, walk everywhere, just being a little more alert. I consider NYC a safe city.
i do miss the food in brooklyn, but i think a lot of the food in the US is poor value. there’s no $5 lunch anymore. still plenty of cheap food in asia. yes the racism. i’ve lived in nyc since the 80’s and i can handle it. but i want to go on a cross country road trip with my wife, and i feel like the current state of 🇺🇸 racism, that road trip will be an episode straight out of Deliverance.
Surprised at that — or maybe you’re just being careful, which is smart. My wife was just in HK for business last week, and 95% of our expat friends are gone. Of those that stayed, one mom was arrested and did jail time for being caught on video at a protest. Another family that we remain very close with was just forced to send their son to boarding school after he was caught posting something negative about China online and expelled from his international school. HK was a city where East and West broke bread and partied together until the wee hours of the morning. Now it’s just another city in China.
yeah, none of that was worth getting arrested and possibly deported over. the quality of life is still very good here.
Once you've learned to drive on both sides switching back is easy. And in case you make any mistakes in America there will usually be a helpful fellow driver who will kindly let you know with a hand gesture.
yeah i still remember driving protocols using friendly hand gestures 🤌
 
none of that was worth getting arrested and possibly deported over.
the quality of life is still very good here.
I struggle a bit with the tension between these two sentiments.

I’ve got deep, lifelong, personal ties with the place. When I went back for a 2-week visit this past winter, in some ways, life has never been better there. The city looks cleaned up, and there are cool new civic projects.

But how can quality of life be good if you always have that thought in the back of your mind that you could be arrested for something as benign as gesturing four numbers with your hands in public?

I certainly wouldn’t want to raise kids there, and most people I know have an escape plan if/when it comes to it.
 
Since I'm more into savory than sweet, always wanted to try a 'bull shot.'


BULL SHOT
(FROM MUSSO FRANK GRILL IN LOS ANGELES CA)

1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/8 teaspoon celery salt
-
Ice cubes
1/4 cup vodka
3/4 cup chilled double-rich double-strength canned beef broth
Lime wedge
since I recently inadvertely poured the tbs of fond that was supposed to go in my sauce in my glass of wine I think I know how this may taste....not for me...where I'm usually open to anything.
 
I struggle a bit with the tension between these two sentiments.

I’ve got deep, lifelong, personal ties with the place. When I went back for a 2-week visit this past winter, in some ways, life has never been better there. The city looks cleaned up, and there are cool new civic projects.

But how can quality of life be good if you always have that thought in the back of your mind that you could be arrested for something as benign as gesturing four numbers with your hands in public?

I certainly wouldn’t want to raise kids there, and most people I know have an escape plan if/when it comes to it.

i dunno. i consider it a privilege to even be here. so i feel like i need to respect what is now currently in place. it's like when i go to thailand, i don't question lese majeste laws. i'm a guest in the country and i need to respect that. but there is a certain point where we draw the line. like if they start seizing assets and removing hk's free trade status, then we are gone. it's still a very lively place to do business. and geographically, at the center of it all if you are doing trade. but if the **** hits the fan, we are fortunate enough to live elsewhere, or anywhere really. but we still choose to live here for now.
 
Meat closer to the bone generally has more flavor. Think dark meat and wings with chicken, t-bones and ribeye vs filet mignon, baby back ribs vs pork chop, short ribs. etc.

There’s a lot of exceptions, like brisket and pork belly but I think those run into another rule that fatty and hard-working tough cuts also taste pretty great when cooked properly.

And also I challenge your nigiri sushi with a steaming hot hamachi kama fresh off the grill.
Distance to bones has little to do with it; most of the less flavorful options you mentioned are just as close to bones. It's all about how much activity a muscle gets as it'll lead to more circulation and different structure.
Hence why there's almost always an inverse relationship between flavour and tenderness.

Fatty cuts like bacon are a bit weird...fat doesn't necessarily add a lot of flavor but it does keep meat juicier after cooking, and might indirectly benefit taste by being a carrier of flavor and our brains being programmed to simply appreciate fatty foods.
 
Last edited:
Distance to bones has little to do with it; most of the less flavorful options you mentionedmare just as close to bones. It's all about how much activity a muscle gets as it'll lead to more circulation and different structure.
Hence why there's almost always an inverse relationship between flavour and tenderness.

Fatty cuts like bacon are a bit weird...fat doesn't necessarily add a lot of flavor but it does keep meat juicier after cooking, and might indirectly benefit taste by being a carrier of flavor and our brains being programmed to simply appreciate fatty foods.

Just to expand in this a little. Tuna and beef and chicken thighs are all "dark meat" because of myoglobin. It is an oxygen carrier. The more muscles get used the more myoglobin gets developed, the darker the meat. Tunas never stop swimming and their main long distance swimming muscle is their loin. That's why it's so dark. Chicken breasts on farmed chickens don't get used much so the flesh stays white. Fat affects mouth feel more than flavor. The molecules are too big for us to taste but we can feel them and they feel good. Fat molecules also carry fat soluble aromatics which we experience as part of flavor combined with the water soluble molecules that our taste buds taste.
 
Just to expand in this a little. Tuna and beef and chicken thighs are all "dark meat" because of myoglobin. It is an oxygen carrier. The more muscles get used the more myoglobin gets developed, the darker the meat. Tunas never stop swimming and their main long distance swimming muscle is their loin. That's why it's so dark. Chicken breasts on farmed chickens don't get used much so the flesh stays white. Fat affects mouth feel more than flavor. The molecules are too big for us to taste but we can feel them and they feel good. Fat molecules also carry fat soluble aromatics which we experience as part of flavor combined with the water soluble molecules that our taste buds taste.
Yea thanks for adding the technical background. Was too much to type on a tablet. :D
Another thing that makes a huge difference is diet (although I have a hard time disentangling the effect from welfare as they tend to correlate). Both on the muscle color & flavor but also on fat composition and color.
My general experience is that darker will always be better and more flavorful.

The fat equals flavor mantra you hear a lot in recent years is IMO very much overstated and easily disproven by flavorful lean game meats like venison.
 
Last edited:
Some flavors dissolve in fat, some in water, IMHO you need both unless there is a specific single/group of flavors you try to incorporate in something.
I think it's no coincidence that so many cuisines either prepare a meat in fat, add fat to cooking mediums, or add a sauce containing fat post-cooking.
 
Some flavors dissolve in fat, some in water, IMHO you need both unless there is a specific single/group of flavors you try to incorporate in something.

Technically, smells dissolve in fats. Flavor = taste + smell. There's an ongoing scientific debate about whether fat has an intrinsic taste. But most of it's affect on the experience of flavor is olfactory.
 
Technically, smells dissolve in fats. Flavor = taste + smell. There's an ongoing scientific debate about whether fat has an intrinsic taste. But most of it's affect on the experience of flavor is olfactory.
Pure fat doesn't have much taste, in my experience. Yes, there is some flavour in rendered pork/beef/duck fat, but it is quite mild. Many plant fats, especially highly refined ones, have almost no flavour at all.

I agree on the smell aspect. Fat has a lot to do with that. And smell makes up the lion's share of the eating experience. Just try eating something with a clamp on your nose. Something like 80% of the experience disappears without smell.
 
Many plant fats, especially highly refined ones, have almost no flavour at all.
That's also because a lot of them get deodorized during processing to make them remotely palatable.
 
yeah, none of that was worth getting arrested and possibly deported over. the quality of life is still very good here.
As the saying goes, all it takes for evil to prevail is for good men (and women) to do nothing.
Sounds like bread and circusses still work...
 
Pure fat doesn't have much taste, in my experience. Yes, there is some flavour in rendered pork/beef/duck fat, but it is quite mild. Many plant fats, especially highly refined ones, have almost no flavour at all.

I agree on the smell aspect. Fat has a lot to do with that. And smell makes up the lion's share of the eating experience. Just try eating something with a clamp on your nose. Something like 80% of the experience disappears without smell.

It has to do with the size of the molecules. Taste bud receptors are sized to accept water soluble compounds. Water is a tiny tiny molecule. Fat molecules we eat are generally triglycerides, three chains of hydrocarbons held together by glycerol. They are orders of magnitude bigger than water molecules. This is also what makes oils less dense and float on top of water. You just can't cram them as tightly into a space and they don't mix with water because they are nonpolar. Our olfactory senses deal with smell molecules which are much larger and thus fat soluble. This is why garlic oil smells so much stronger than it tastes. Fat also cuts tastes. It does this physically by running interference and blocking some of the water soluble molecules from being able to access your taste buds. Emulsions are wonderful things because you get to blend the mouth feels of water and fat and blend their different flavor bringing compounds.

I am working on a YouTube video about vinaigrette where I am going to explain a bunch of this.
 
Let me know if you need more recommendations…there are great Italian and sushi places on the island…

Leaving now, unfortunately! Since it was a family trip and my family prizes ease and convenience, mostly our choices were dictated by proximity to hotel. I had a good sushi takeout meal from Sugarfish last night though! And I went to Bibble and Sip this morning. Got a few things. The cake was a little sweet for us for the morning, but real good. Croissants were very good.
 
It has to do with the size of the molecules. Taste bud receptors are sized to accept water soluble compounds. Water is a tiny tiny molecule. Fat molecules we eat are generally triglycerides, three chains of hydrocarbons held together by glycerol. They are orders of magnitude bigger than water molecules. This is also what makes oils less dense and float on top of water. You just can't cram them as tightly into a space and they don't mix with water because they are nonpolar. Our olfactory senses deal with smell molecules which are much larger and thus fat soluble. This is why garlic oil smells so much stronger than it tastes. Fat also cuts tastes. It does this physically by running interference and blocking some of the water soluble molecules from being able to access your taste buds. Emulsions are wonderful things because you get to blend the mouth feels of water and fat and blend their different flavor bringing compounds.

I am working on a YouTube video about vinaigrette where I am going to explain a bunch of this.
A great post with an asterisk. Smell molecules range from the tiny (nothing but ammonia smells like ammonia) to the rather large (steroids, some peptides) with a sweet spot around the monoterpenes e. g. lemon or weed.
Also, odor molecules are of every polarity, from small alkanes (butane, pentane smell subtly different) to ethanol, acetic acid or DMSO.

Steroids and small peptides have quite low volatility, a limiting physical property. Our olfactory systems are evolved to be extraordinarily sensitive to a small set of these that have adaptive value … like estrogen.
 
A great post with an asterisk. Smell molecules range from the tiny (nothing but ammonia smells like ammonia) to the rather large (steroids, some peptides) with a sweet spot around the monoterpenes e. g. lemon or weed.
Also, odor molecules are of every polarity, from small alkanes (butane, pentane smell subtly different) to ethanol, acetic acid or DMSO.

Steroids and small peptides have quite low volatility, a limiting physical property. Our olfactory systems are evolved to be extraordinarily sensitive to a small set of these that have adaptive value … like estrogen.

I was regretting the way I phrased that. Thanks for the clarification and additional info.
 
I always enjoy testing my own smell against our field testing equipment when screening soil for petroleum constituents. Usually I'm good to about 1 ppm for scented volatiles
I am peculiarly sensitive to cigarette smoke.

We had a solvent in the lab: pyridine. It struck three distinct odor receptors. As an organonitrogen compound, it can be reasonably expected to stink. The class is responsible for the smell of bad fish, rot and death.

It’s a stinker all right: it smells like an unholy mix of fresh dog poo, heavy petroleum and something very dead. However at high concentrations it was hard to distinguish from tetrahydrofuran, another darling of bench chemists. (Those who use red hot blue glue to weld ABS plumbing pipe — that’s the smell. More of a penetrating solvent odor than the full-on stench of pyridine at level two.)

However, at very low, barely perceptible concentrations, it had an almost-pleasant odor somewhat like vanilla.

I always thought that was a cool demo of olfaction at work.
 
Last edited:
Why is everyone so obsessed with pineapple all of a sudden?
Trauma makes for sharp clear memory.

1718310347884.gif
 
Back
Top