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I've been struggling with either to use and embrace my Tsourkan 240 WH and use it or sell. Yesterday I did use it for food prep for dinner but have finally decided that it needs to go. It is a stunning knife but I find I'm using my Yoshis just seem to fit better. I'm a littlie hesitant to put the Tsourkan on the stones where the Yoshi's I have no fear. Probably a mental thing but the Tsourkan is such a work of art it is just hard to use on a daily basis. Anyone else suffer from the same issue?
 

PappaG

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I found myself in that exact same boat and sold mine. I think everyone here will tell you to use it though!
 

Mikeadunne

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I love my Marko gyuto but I totally feel you, the thought of putting on the stones is intimidating. I know I cannot come close to replicating the finish on my own.
 
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Use it!!! I'm sure there's some philosophical support that would claim no better way to honor the work and craftmanship than using the object as intended. Plus you can always send it out for professional sharpening/polishing if you don't want to risk messing anything up yourself.
 
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DitmasPork

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I've been struggling with either to use and embrace my Tsourkan 240 WH and use it or sell. Yesterday I did use it for food prep for dinner but have finally decided that it needs to go. It is a stunning knife but I find I'm using my Yoshis just seem to fit better. I'm a littlie hesitant to put the Tsourkan on the stones where the Yoshi's I have no fear. Probably a mental thing but the Tsourkan is such a work of art it is just hard to use on a daily basis. Anyone else suffer from the same issue?

Your Tsourkan is not a work of art—no knife is, except perhaps Claes Oldenburg's knife (below)—the innate functionality of your Tsourkan disqualifies it from ever being art, no matter how well crafted the blade and handle are made. That said, sell it if you're not jiving with it. Personally, I'd suggest keeping it, you never know if you'll start fancying a WH. If you keep it, put it on the stones, don't worrying about scratches and scuffs, it's just a tool—I have a 225 Tsourkan workhorse, lovely knife, would be a nice contrast to the Yoshi.

knife-ship-1-by-claes-oldenburg.png
 

kpham12

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I use to be super concerned about scuffs and scratches and any other visual defects on my knives until I really started to use them heavily and sharpen and eventually thin them. Now even my more expensive knives have scratches, thinning marks and other signs of heavy use and I see them more as kind of badges of honor than anything else. I think it’s definitely a bit of a mental block and once you take the leap, you don’t mind nearly as much.

That being said, I do tend to avoid knives with really fancy finishes or nice Damascus because I feel I tiny bit more guilty when I go to thin or modify those as opposed to knives with a simple belt or hairline finish.

However, if you do end up keeping the Tsourkan, it’ll inevitably end up gaining some battle scars, but I think that those add character and will end up making you love the knife more as opposed to less.
 

Jason183

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I’ll only sell if it’s not the best performer on specific tasks or isn’t unique in it’s own way.
If it’s the only WH knife or the only knife that makes you think it’s work of art in your collection then I’ll keep it.
 

slickmamba

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WH grind is not for everyone, even if its a mental thing to put it to stone I would sell it. Nothing wrong with keep it in your collection if you want it though
 

Corradobrit1

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I returned mine. Had an overgrind (hole in the edge) and I found the handle too thin for my liking. Beautiful fit and finish and one of the few knives I've used that bit into the endgrain board. We just didn't gel.
 

DitmasPork

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+1 I had to grow into a few myself.

For me, I occasionally find myself unintentionally buying a bunch of knives at the same time—ordering a knife directly; spotting something on bst; and my name coming up on a waitlist all at the same time—so some don’t make it to the kitchen immediately.
 
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You bought it for a reason. You owe it to yourself to try it. If it's not for you, you can later sell, for a pretty small fee to have that opportunity. It's not like anyone can just go out and buy a Tsourkan on any given day.
Use it, sharpen it (carefully). Once you've done that, it's yours and there's no going back. By doing so, you no longer have the option to "not use/not sharpen." I suspect you'll be more comfortable and will embrace the choice once you commit to it.
[And now I'm off to follow my own advice and use some of my more expensive knives . . . ]
 

adam92

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If using the knife make you feel happier, use it, don’t worry about refinish or scratches, those scratches make them have their new character & soul.

Unless the weight, grind doesn’t fit you, otherwise probably keep it.
 
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