Welded tang, does it matter?

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blokey

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I was watching a video about Ryusen knives, but noticed they use welded tang in some of their western Knives, does it matter in regard to strength? I know it probably gonna cost alot more to do a integral, but how does it compare to pinged on bolsters? I'm really interested in buying one of the ryusen knives.

The video in question
 

blokey

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Kind reminds me TF looks like it is welded on too.
Capture.JPG
 
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Assuming they use proper technique when welding, it could potentially be tougher than otherwise. There are variables though. Like the type of filler material they use, the skill of the welder, and other things. I don't honestly see it making it weaker than otherwise. Usually the tang on knives isn't hardened in the first place so the strength will likely not be effected in that regard.

I can say, under kitchen use, it certainly wont matter.
 

Pie

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I can’t imagine you’d be using it hard enough for it to matter. Hopefully not anyways.

Ryusen knives are pretty good.. I have one in VG10, my wife started using it so I have to sharpen it every couple weeks - easy to get sharp, and amenable to being ground by jnat. The grind, f&f, and geometry is also quite good. Very slim, but heavy due to that weird hybrid handle idea. I don’t love how visually garish some of them are anymore, although I definitely used to.

Imo buy with confidence.

Someone else welds the tang onto wa handle.. I think it’s Takeda. Doesn’t seem to cause any issues 🙂
 
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Delat

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I used to view welding with suspicion but I’ve seen so many respected bladesmiths talk about doing it that I’ve come to accept I’m just ignorant on the subject and it’s just fine.
 
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I will add, although not 1 for 1 with high carbon steels, and knifemaking. Generally in construction. Something that has been welded (assuming it was done skillfully) will be considered to actually be stronger than a non welded item.
 

blokey

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Thanks guys, that's really reassuring knowing Ryusen's quality, just ordered one from Miura.
 

blokey

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Ryusen make some great knives. Buy with confidence.

Which one did you buy?
The western handled 240 Blazen, always want a nice stainless knife. With the current conversion rate and 10% off at Miura is one heck of deal.
 

Nemo

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The western handled 240 Blazen, always want a nice stainless knife. With the current conversion rate and 10% off at Miura is one heck of deal.
Blazen is a beaut knife. Great balance. Excellent fit and finish. Feels great in the hand. A reasonably thin grind (not laser like though) with decent food release given its thinness.

You may find this thread helpful when it comes to thinning time:

I guess it would be a bit easier to refinish from a medium stone than from a coarse stone, so maybe consider a maintenance thinning schedule every time you need to drop down to a medium stone (I.e.: whenever a 'quick' touch up on a fine stone takes more than a dozen or so strokes to create a burr). And you will have a better performing knife in the meantime.
 

blokey

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Blazen is a beaut knife. Great balance. Excellent fit and finish. Feels great in the hand. A reasonably thin grind (not laser like though) with decent food release given its thinness.

You may find this thread helpful when it comes to thinning time:

I guess it would be a bit easier to refinish from a medium stone than from a coarse stone, so maybe consider a maintenance thinning schedule every time you need to drop down to a medium stone (I.e.: whenever a 'quick' touch up on a fine stone takes more than a dozen or so strokes to create a burr). And you will have a better performing knife in the meantime.
Thanks, that helps a lot, I was able get a hand on with one and with really impressed with the grind and distal taper.
 

Pie

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Good purchase!

The laser-but-not-laser feel is… almost unique in my small collection. Most worth it for a low maintenance, well constructed knife.
 

blokey

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Good purchase!

The laser-but-not-laser feel is… almost unique in my small collection. Most worth it for a low maintenance, well constructed knife.
Thanks! Is there anything that it can compare in terms of cutting feel? I feel like it might be able to compare to something like Yoshikane or maybe Watanabe just looking at the choil.
 

Pie

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Thanks! Is there anything that it can compare in terms of cutting feel? I feel like it might be able to compare to something like Yoshikane or maybe Watanabe just looking at the choil.
It’s quite thin behind the edge, and it’s more of a soft shinogi than wide bevel. It reminds me a bit of how myojin’s grinds feel in a very broad sense, albeit much much less refined. I haven’t had my hands on either yoshi or wat unfortunately.
 
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