What grit ceramic rod to get? If any?

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

10160

Active Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2021
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Location
USA
So, newbie to j-knives here. I read that you want to get a ceramic rod with them instead of a steel steel. Question is, what grit do you get? I normally see them at 1000,1500,2000. I was looking at the
CKTG Black Ceramic Sharpening Rod 270mm
from CKTG with stellar reviews that is a 2k grit.

But, do you even need one? I have also read people saying that you dont need it and its better to hone on a whetstone. So many different opinions, ugh.
The two knives I will be using it on have sg2 steel if that matters.
 

daveb

Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderators
Joined
Mar 12, 2012
Messages
12,789
Reaction score
5,123
A rod will typically do more harm than good for a Japanese knife. The rod to blade contact area is very small and all of the force is applied to that small area. The Japanese blades are much harder than their Euro counterparts and do not flex. This may result in chipping the blade.

Sharpening stones are the ideal way of maintaining a Japanese knife. A couple will get you started, I like the Shapton Pro series, especially for newcomers.

I do keep a Mac Black Rod for emergency, right damn now, touch ups. As rods go this is one of the most popular among users.


As a side note, if you peruse the togo site, you'll find everything in there gets very high reviews. I wouldn't lend much credence to them. And to be fair, that's true of most web sites.
 

Hz_zzzzzz

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2019
Messages
1,087
Reaction score
1,658
Location
CT
I have the Mac Black and it works fine for my Shuns, Yaxells and Miyabis. I never tried it on my good knives but I bet if I do it carefully it can also hone my nice knives a little bit.
 

chefwp

Timing is everything when doing a raindance
Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2020
Messages
310
Reaction score
846
Location
Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Consider having a leather strop on hand instead of a rod? Many folks make these themselves, denim works too. You can even apply a compound to them to make them more effective or to polish, Here is an example of a strop and compound.
 
Last edited:

stringer

Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
1,233
Reaction score
2,780
Location
Richmond, VA
I have used all kinds of stuff over the years but I've come full circle back to my hick roots and touch up knives the way my great grandfather showed me some 35 years ago. I use a small pocketknife stone in hand. I like soft arks, washitas, and coticules for this task.
 

bahamaroot

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2013
Messages
1,897
Reaction score
1,192
Location
Happy Town
Get the Idahone Fine Ceramic Rod it's the better one and is 3000 JIS. It is listed as 1200 grit but that is on the ANSI(US scale).
I keep a ceramic in my kitchen and use it on a wide variety of J-knives with no problems.
 

Bobby2shots

Senior Member
Joined
May 8, 2019
Messages
507
Reaction score
272
Location
Lachute Quebec
I use an Idahone 10.5" "fine" ceramic sharpening/honing rod (1200 grit U.S.), and I've recently added the 10.5" "coarse" ceramic rod. (300 grit U.S.) I've used the "fine" for roughly 2.5 years, and have yet to try or need the 300. I've been experimenting with the 1200 to see how long I can use only that rod (no stones) for sharpening/honing my 6.25 Victorinox petty/utility/sandwich knife that I purchased in Nov. 2018. As of yesterday (Sept. 15th,'21), it's been 2 years and 10 months, and I've used that knife 5-6 times a day. I have yet to sharpen it on stones. I never allow that knife to get dull, and if it doesn't cut tomatoes on the first attempt, I immediately use the rod. Occasionally, I'll strop the knife on my leather paddle-strop, or, I'll simply strop it on a dish-towel that's draped over my stoves' oven-handle after washing/drying the knife.

There was a brief period where the 1200 "fine" did not appear to be removing metal, and it's now working fine again. I suspect that this was due to a residue from cleaning the rod with Idahones' Superaser,,,, but that has yet to be confirmed. The Superaser however, does a great job at cleaning the rod.

Over the last 4-5 months, there has been rare occasions where I've needed to use a steel, in combination with the Idahone rod. I've been using trailing edge strokes exclusively, and very light strokes. 3-4 strokes is usually enough.

FWIW, I have plenty of stones; Shapton Glass 120, 220, 320, 500, 1k, 2k, 3k, 4k, 8k, Diamond Glass Lapping plate, etc. Norton 220,1k, 4k, 8k, waterstones, Norton fine/coarse Crystolon, Naniwa Green Brick of Joy, King 800/4000 combo, Large Naniwa flattening stone, black Arkansas stone, Atoma 400 and 1200 diamond plates, various 3M micro-films, SiC powders and abrasive sheets, paddle strop, a Tormek SuperGrind 2000, 6" and 8" bench grinders with specialty wheels, Chef'sChoice TriZor, and a few more goodies.
 
Last edited:

Benuser

from The Netherlands, EU.
Supporting Member
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
7,387
Reaction score
1,920
For soft steels the Sieger LongLife is an excellent option. But indeed, an emergency solution. No replacement of stones. It restores the edge without taking into account the entire geometry. Frequent use will lead to thickening behind the edge.
For only restoring an edge with soft steels there isn't always need for an abrasive ceramic rod. An almost smooth steel rod as the Dickoron Micro is another possibility. To be used with a very light touch, and not with steels beyond 62Rc.
For both ceramic and steel rods: please respect the blade's asymmetry and follow the existing edge. There is a serious learning curve in avoiding the risk of a wire edge.
 

coxhaus

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2020
Messages
764
Reaction score
723
Location
Texas
I have found using my Worksharp Ken Onion sharpener there is no reason to use a steel. I have not used one in years. I just do a pull through 1 time on the Worksharp with an extra fine belt if the knife needs attention. I am now trying to only power strop using the Worksharp with polishing compound if the knife needs attention. Stropping is new for me so I can't really tell you how it is going. I have stropped all my knives and I will see how it goes. I have not had to sharpen again since stropping my knives. I am going to try to avoid stones for a long time.

I am sharpening Wusthof Classic knives and Henckels 4star knives. I have 1 MAC Pro knife that I sharpen.
 
Last edited:
Top