What is the one knife you would never sell or trade?

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madelinez

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Since were talking TFs here’s mine. 240 Western Denka, the very last one they produced in 2019. It was showed to me in unfinished and unground form. If you believe in Japanese swordsmith traditions, the final piece is always the best one and it’s only kept for themselves and offered to people who will use it to it’s fullest ability. I’m honored TF thought I was worthy of it.

Perfect knife, no overgrinds, flat bevels, eased spine and choil, lefty bias ground and stupidly thin, friction fit saya. It’s like they heard what I wanted and delivered.

View attachment 67542
Hey I'm not a TF fanboy but if you sell me that one I'll become his biggest cheerleader ;)
 

mack

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I have at least 2 never giveaways, both Kamons.



The smaller one is used by my wife, it's the first custom Benjamin ever made and it is a 5-layer san mai. The black one is a 7-layer san mai with stainless cladding, simply perfection in performance and looking.

Mack
 

MAS4T0

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I have at least 2 never giveaways, both Kamons.

The smaller one is used by my wife, it's the first custom Benjamin ever made and it is a 5-layer san mai. The black one is a 7-layer san mai with stainless cladding, simply perfection in performance and looking.

Mack
Mack,

What's the reason for the extra layers? Aesthetics?

BTW, 5-layers of lamination would be go-mai (go=5) as opposed to san-mai (san=3).
 
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Benuser

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I hope I never will have to sell these two Sheffields I got from @sachem allison

The larger one is a Latham & Owen from 1948, the smaller one is from the twenties. Before war Sheffield knew a lot of home production, workers had only a few facilities in common. After war only, production took place in factories — built with the Marshall-aid, as not much was left after the bombing.
Both knives are made of some spicy kind of carbon steel I have only seen with the very best Sabs. Don't know what those Sheffield folks added to the Swedish ore — or didn't remove from it.
 

lemeneid

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I hope I never will have to sell these two Sheffields I got from @sachem allison

The larger one is a Latham & Owen from 1948, the smaller one is from the twenties. Before war Sheffield knew a lot of home production, workers had only a few facilities in common. After war only, production took place in factories — built with the Marshall-aid, as not much was left after the bombing.
Both knives are made of some spicy kind of carbon steel I have only seen with the very best Sabs. Don't know what those Sheffield folks added to the Swedish ore — or didn't remove from it.
Amazing! Have you used those knives? How do they cut and sharpen up?
 

mack

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Mack,

What's the reason for the extra layers? Aesthetics?

BTW, 5-layers of lamination would be go-mai (go=5) as opposed to san-mai (san=3).
There is one layer nickel on each side which doesn't allow C to diffuse. And it's aesthetics as well.

Mack.
 

Benuser

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Amazing! Have you used those knives? How do they cut and sharpen up?
My favourites at home. Remarkable distal taper, slightly less extreme than with pre-war Sabs. Steel is much harder, I guess 58Rc. Take and hold an amazing edge. Slightly more abrasion resistant than other carbons.
 

Carl Kotte

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My favourites at home. Remarkable distal taper, slightly less extreme than with pre-war Sabs. Steel is much harder, I guess 58Rc. Take and hold an amazing edge. Slightly more abrasion resistant than other carbons.
These look lovely. And from your description they sound lovely too. Wonderful!
 

Geigs

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I have at least 2 never giveaways, both Kamons.



The smaller one is used by my wife, it's the first custom Benjamin ever made and it is a 5-layer san mai. The black one is a 7-layer san mai with stainless cladding, simply perfection in performance and looking.

Mack
What core steel are these, that black looks awesome
Is it etched or patina?
 

mack

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What core steel are these, that black looks awesome
Is it etched or patina?
@Geigs

Core steel is 1.2519 on both knives. The black one is etched. I really like this look, it's a deep dark black, which you can find at the handle as well. The cladding of the blade and the end caps of the handle are stainless steel. So you can find the black/silver materials on both - the handle and the blade.

Some close-up pics:






Mack.
 
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sleepy

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I hope I never will have to sell these two Sheffields I got from @sachem allison

The larger one is a Latham & Owen from 1948, the smaller one is from the twenties. Before war Sheffield knew a lot of home production, workers had only a few facilities in common. After war only, production took place in factories — built with the Marshall-aid, as not much was left after the bombing.
Both knives are made of some spicy kind of carbon steel I have only seen with the very best Sabs. Don't know what those Sheffield folks added to the Swedish ore — or didn't remove from it.
How can you tell what kind of carbon steel an older knife is made of? For example, is there any way to know or confirm if a knife is Blue #1, White #2, etc without being told?
 

ecchef

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I guess I’m not as sentimental about my culinary knives any more; none are in the ‘take to the grave’ category. The Bauchops on the other hand...
 

sachem allison

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I hope I never will have to sell these two Sheffields I got from @sachem allison

The larger one is a Latham & Owen from 1948, the smaller one is from the twenties. Before war Sheffield knew a lot of home production, workers had only a few facilities in common. After war only, production took place in factories — built with the Marshall-aid, as not much was left after the bombing.
Both knives are made of some spicy kind of carbon steel I have only seen with the very best Sabs. Don't know what those Sheffield folks added to the Swedish ore — or didn't remove from it.
Those were some of my favorites to use also. Happy holidays, guys
 

cotedupy

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I was about to post basically exactly the same thread, but thought I'd do a search first... Great to see some of people's favourites! I'm cheating and putting two, one of which officially belongs to my better half, and one of which isn't a kitchen knife.

Blenheim Forge Stainless Clad Funyaki. A birthday present for my wife a couple of years back, I actually swapped this one for wine. I tried to give them far more than the rrp of the knife, but as I work in the industry it actually cost me very little, apart from a lot of time and effort getting various bottles together and delivering to them over a few months.

I suspect also it may probably be a prototype from when they were just starting the stainless clad range. The handle looks like one of the bog oak, brass, and Richlite handles they use for special editions, rather than the normal version on the website.

And my 20 odd year old Opinel Carbon no.8. Miraculously I've not managed to lose this over the years, tho I did snap the tip off on the decking of a boat just after I got it while trying to cut the head off an eel. As a bonus I discovered the other day that the flat tip works almost like a tiny chisel when doing fine woodwork.

IMG_0954.jpg
 

F-Flash

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My second serious J-knife, one that my wife (at the time gf) bought me as present:

Masamoto ks gyuto 240mm (I had to marry her after that, right?!)


Knife that we cut our wedding cake with:

Loon knifeworks damascus slicer 315mm (won it on auction, and the purpose of buying, was to use it as wedding cake slicer). Don't worry about the knife, only me and wife used it to cut the cake and had wooden plate where the cake rested 😁.


And two knives I bought while we were at our honeymoon, we flew to Bangkok and worked our way down to Singapore. One must see places for me was razorsharp. Never been to proper knifestore before. I/we Bought Mizuno honyaki white #2 gyuto 240mm and yozhikazu tanaka white #2 kurouchi gyuto 240mm. Tells something about my knife preferences.

 
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IsoJ

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This is lovely, can you tell me a bit more about the style of knife/maker...?
Leuku is a hunting knife. Traditionally used by reindeerman in Lapland Finland. Doesnt suite for carving very well, more of handling the meat and using as a small billhook?. This one has a curly birch handle with brass cap and stainless blade. Iisakki Järvenpää is over 100 years old maker and nowadays I believe around 10 people are working in the factory. They do mostly different puukko models for carving, hunting and fishfileting.
 

AFKitchenknivesguy

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As someone wrote earlier, this is a topic that comes up now and then.

I don't think any knives fall into the must keep realm, but if I had to grab one it would be my original damascus Kramer, cause I could replace a lot of knives when I sell it! (I had another original Kramer I used, it performed awesome and I wish I still had it)
20200621_112924.jpg

Here is my old one
20160803_191659_zpsjvvuuojc.jpg
 

kleeer

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This was my first custom knife. It was a birthday present from my lovely wife ❤. Of course, that's The reason why it's never sold.

It is a handforged San Mai Construction with the german ultra pure, low alloy carbon steel Called SC145 and framed by dutch butter iron.

BTW: The blacksmith is called Jean-Jose Tritz ...a frenchman living in hamburg, germany and IMHO his San Mai knives have the best foodrelease of all concepts dealing with the subject.

be soulful, kup
 
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