What Japanese Makers Are Doing "Classic" French Profiles?

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HumbleHomeCook

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I think this is what I want to know. My understanding of that old school French chef profile is sort of sleek with a longer "flat" profile and a spear-like tip. If I'm right, then those are the profiles I'm talking about!

I'm guessing a lot of these will be OEM's which is fine and I'd actually like to know about western handle offerings as well as Wa.
 
Doi-san’s 240 gyuto

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Everyone were doing it the French way, old German, American knives are very French too, their knife simply has a huge impact on western cuisine, Japan also learned from French manufacturers first, some old Masakane still have French words on them
Oh I thought you asked why… it’s “what”, then in that case probably a lot of KS stuff, Sugimoto are great
 
I'm not a Sab nerd so I can't really compare with a vintage sab in hand but...
Masamoto KS is usually what gets mentioned first here...but keep in mind that when people are referring to 'the' KS they are referring to the 240 model, which runs long and has about 255 mm edge length.
Something very close to that (at least on the edge profile side of things) is an Ashi Ginga 270 wagyuto (because they run rather short). In general I think their 240s and 270s might thick the box?

Two other classical options that have stuck rather close to French influences are Mac and Misono, but at least with the Misono there's again a pretty big difference between the 210 and the 240 where IMO the 240 profiles are just better.

Another option that comes to mind are JCK's Carbonext knives. Again, the 210 is a bit of a redheaded stepchild when it comes to profile but the 240 and 270 are really sweet. Only real drawback is that the grind is unremarkable at best... but I'm not sure that's much better with Mac or Misono these days.

You miight see a theme here... if you want to go down this road I think you'd really have to put your short knife preference on ice for a while... the shorter models just don't work as well because there isn't enough room to work with and you end up with either a hockey stick profile or a tall petty.
 
It was a word play on Québec. (I’m not sure you’re there, but I like my odds.)

In retrospect, Keibeku would have been phonetically more apt.
Ohhhhh

Interestingly enough, when I put that word into translate and hit the button to transition from one to the other "Quebec" is what it settled on.

I'm actually in Ontario though, the population is about 60% french.
 
I'm not a Sab nerd so I can't really compare with a vintage sab in hand but...
Masamoto KS is usually what gets mentioned first here...but keep in mind that when people are referring to 'the' KS they are referring to the 240 model, which runs long and has about 255 mm edge length.
Something very close to that (at least on the edge profile side of things) is an Ashi Ginga 270 wagyuto (because they run rather short). In general I think their 240s and 270s might thick the box?

Two other classical options that have stuck rather close to French influences are Mac and Misono, but at least with the Misono there's again a pretty big difference between the 210 and the 240 where IMO the 240 profiles are just better.

Another option that comes to mind are JCK's Carbonext knives. Again, the 210 is a bit of a redheaded stepchild when it comes to profile but the 240 and 270 are really sweet. Only real drawback is that the grind is unremarkable at best... but I'm not sure that's much better with Mac or Misono these days.

You miight see a theme here... if you want to go down this road I think you'd really have to put your short knife preference on ice for a while... the shorter models just don't work as well because there isn't enough room to work with and you end up with either a hockey stick profile or a tall petty.

The 8" chef's knife has been around for a long time.

I'm not changing my length preferences.
 
This is ila great knife if you can get one from CKTG with their MSRP
gotta have ffaasstt fingers

Some folks like big-game fishing. Others get their ya-yas out by working hot new drops at (yeah there)
 
The 8" chef's knife has been around for a long time.

I'm not changing my length preferences.
But a lot of the Japanese ones are kinda meh in comparison to their slightly larger brethren. Especially on Seki Made knives 210s are just entirety different from 240s.

It's not a coincidence that 'the' KS everyone loves is a 240 (and a long one at that), that the clones are 240s, and that K-Sabatier didn't even make an 8 inch model in their 200 series.
 
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