what loupe strength do you suggest for edge checks? 10, 15, 20x?

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by canali, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Jul 7, 2018 #1

    canali

    canali

    canali

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2018
    Messages:
    10
    what loupe strength do you suggest for edge checks? 10, 15, 20x?
    belemo or b/l i presume are the better brands...i should also make sure it's a 'triplet'?
     
  2. Jul 7, 2018 #2

    daveb

    daveb

    daveb

    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Messages:
    7,810
    Easy answer is none - but it's a "thing" everybody goes thru.

    I have a 20x and 40x laying in a junk drawer. Cheap is good. In the states they're about $5 on Amazon.

    The main value of the "paper test" is that it will show you where any dings are that are too small to see.
     
  3. Jul 7, 2018 #3

    Grunt173

    Grunt173

    Grunt173

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2017
    Messages:
    318
    Location:
    Northeast Ohio
    Short answer,none of your picks. I would say 30x minimum. I have the 10x and the 20x,waste of money and collecting dust or the wife uses them to find a splinter. My 30x does ok but you have to practically put your nose right down by the edge to see clearly. Anymore,I just go by feel or do a cut test.
     
  4. Jul 7, 2018 #4

    canali

    canali

    canali

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2018
    Messages:
    10
    thanks gang...i'm now reading similar ops about it not being essential...that instead many more savvy sharpeners bypass a loupe and instead also just look for a consistent streak of light all along the edge when sharpening, and that any black or shadow shows a burr is still there..i'm also going to experiment with a sharpie given i'm a newbie to it.

    i do have one of those edge angle guides (that attaches to the knife) which i'll initially use for the first handful, as i read consistency of angle in stroke is more important than the angle used, though i'll still aim for 15-20 degrees of course when i'm not using it.

    question: how can you check by a cut test (say it cuts fine after sharpening)
    do you simply run the knife very slowly thru the paper to listen/feel for any rougher, slower cuts?

    will be sharpening my 2nd knife (or 1st , independent from sharpening class i took) in a few days...i'm stoked!:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2018
  5. Jul 7, 2018 #5

    McMan

    McMan

    McMan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2018
    Messages:
    229
    I agree with Dave--and mine lives in the junk drawer too. It probably won't help much (if at all) with sharpening and there are easier/better methods to check the edge (fingers, paper test). But they are fun to use just to check stuff out. It's like being back in kindergarten--any time I take it out to look at an edge I look at whatever else is nearby...
    This works way better than a loupe since it's 20-40x and focuses (can't focus a loupe):
    https://www.amazon.com/Carson-Micro...70&sr=8-6&keywords=carson+handheld+microscope
     
  6. Jul 7, 2018 #6

    canali

    canali

    canali

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2018
    Messages:
    10
    -------------------------------

    per magnification, i hear you: brings out the kid in you, that 'oh, so cool!' factor
     
  7. Jul 7, 2018 #7

    Dave Martell

    Dave Martell

    Dave Martell

    Forum Founder Professional Craftsman

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    13,307
    Location:
    Airville, PA
    Actually it's the opposite. A burr will glint in the light and a clean (sharp) edge shows no reflection at it's apex.


    As to your loupe question, I too say skip it, unless you have an additional use for it once you realize it doesn't help much at all for sharpening.

    I bought a Belomo 10x triplet back in the 90's when they first came to the western market, these things are great and were practically free at the time. I looked at edges initially and then just stopped but the loupe served me well on many antiquing trips. Seeing a makers mark on old knives ad razors can be tough sometimes. :)
     
  8. Jul 7, 2018 #8

    canali

    canali

    canali

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2018
    Messages:
    10
    -------------------
    Thanks for clarifying the burr visuals.
     
  9. Jul 10, 2018 #9

    Boynutman

    Boynutman

    Boynutman

    SR. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2014
    Messages:
    61
    I bought a 20 euro 20x loupe in a dusty stamp collectors shop some years ago. It helped me learn how to feel a bur, so I always felt it was useful. Plus you can see in more detail what finish a stone leaves on the edge. Plus I liked looking at the edge just for the sake of it. Money well spent as far as I am concerned.
     
  10. Jul 11, 2018 #10

    chinacats

    chinacats

    chinacats

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2012
    Messages:
    6,447
    I enjoy having a glass but for other purposes. For feeling an edge I think the best thing I ever did was to learn the 3 finger test from an old Murray Carter video.
     
  11. Jul 11, 2018 #11

    Grunt173

    Grunt173

    Grunt173

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2017
    Messages:
    318
    Location:
    Northeast Ohio
    Yep,me too.I think I use the three finger test more then anything.My three fingers tell me a lot about my edge safely. They clearly tell me if my edge is good or not good,there is no in between.
     
  12. Jul 11, 2018 #12

    krx927

    krx927

    krx927

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2014
    Messages:
    607
    My opinion also! Not much use in sharpening it self. I find the most usage for loupe using it compare the grit of the stones.
     
  13. Jul 11, 2018 #13

    canali

    canali

    canali

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2018
    Messages:
    10
    this 3 finger dave murray test?
     
  14. Jul 11, 2018 #14

    chinacats

    chinacats

    chinacats

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2012
    Messages:
    6,447
    Who's Dave Murray, lol? FWIW, that is Murray Carter in the linked video and yes that is the 3 finger test.
     
  15. Jul 11, 2018 #15

    daveb

    daveb

    daveb

    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Messages:
    7,810
    That's not Murray Carter. That's two finger Dave Murray - his cousin. Dave conceived the test but never perfected it.
     
  16. Jul 11, 2018 #16

    Godslayer

    Godslayer

    Godslayer

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2014
    Messages:
    1,859
    Gonna be honest, I can make a knife sharpener, really really sharp and I've never used a loupe, if there's a burr and it's small I just run the knife through a wine/beer cork and strop the blade, a loupe is for jewelry no t knives. Maybe you could use it to estimate the grit of a natural stone as mentioned before .But those are more about mystique anyway. Take the $5 and buy your self a nice beer instead.
     
  17. Jul 13, 2018 #17

    Bill13

    Bill13

    Bill13

    SR. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2013
    Messages:
    1,951
    Damn Dave that made me LOL.
     
  18. Jul 14, 2018 #18

    Marek07

    Marek07

    Marek07

    SR. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2016
    Messages:
    992
    :D Very funny Dave!
    I miss the all the other emoticons - there's no ROFL. :(
     
  19. Jul 14, 2018 #19

    Mucho Bocho

    Mucho Bocho

    Mucho Bocho

    SR. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2012
    Messages:
    3,502
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    What everyone said is absolutely correct. Personally I use a loop, not observe the edge, but the sides, especially when thinning. I like to see the scratch pattern, cause everyone the sharpens wobbles. I also like to see how the angles are blended. On certain knives like a gyuto/nakiri, I'll put a little more shoulder on the right side to aid in food release, others like Suji I prefer zero bevels.

    RANT:I'm going to make a blanket statement here: Using the three finger test is not useful its mandatory. I'm not a knife maker, but those that are, am I wrong? If you don't have horizontal slices through the first two layers of your epidermis on your fingers, learn how to get them.
     

Share This Page