Quantcast

Whatever happened to Aritsugu A-type?

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

TDj

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
144
Reaction score
0
Hey guys,

Whatever happened to Aritusugu A-type? Is that soooo 3 years ago? I just thought about it when I was posting at KF - but I figure that over here it might get more response - especially b/c I'm sure that Dave has sharpened his fair share of A-types. So do they live up to their hype? Are they tougher than anything else out there? Semi-stainless, right? And at 240, they're not super-thick. Souns like a winner, no?
 

bprescot

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
671
Reaction score
24
Location
Berkeley, CA
I had one and ended up selling it. I've no idea if the steel is as awesome as it's cracked up to be, simply because the profile was such that I never really used it. It's super easy to keep an edge if all you do is sit in a knife block. For me, the profile was just too dead flat, and the angle of attack was wrong... I just didn't like the shape of the blade.
 

SpikeC

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
3,717
Reaction score
4
There are discussions of it here and there, mostly about how much it needs to be thinned behind the edge.
 

memorael

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2011
Messages
391
Reaction score
1
Its a monster of a knife, the steel gets a real aggressive edge and its a real pain to sharpen for the first time since it comes with no edge whatsoever and the steel is real abrasive resistant. As mentioned for it to shine it has to be thinned and well good luck with that.

BUT! if you put the work into it you will reap the rewards of a good knife. You can also just purchase something like a HD or other tool steel knife and skip the whole thinning shenanigans. I guess it really so last 3 years.
 

TDj

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
144
Reaction score
0
i think the 270 was indeed a monster - extremely thick. But the 240, from what I recall was as thin as Suisin at the spine - maybe a little beefier behind the edge, but nothing like the 270. With all this talk, I kind of want to get a 240 to check it out ... and if i'm in over my head, i can always have our local expert work his magic ...
 

JohnnyChance

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
3,418
Reaction score
15
i think the 270 was indeed a monster - extremely thick. But the 240, from what I recall was as thin as Suisin at the spine - maybe a little beefier behind the edge, but nothing like the 270. With all this talk, I kind of want to get a 240 to check it out ... and if i'm in over my head, i can always have our local expert work his magic ...
IIRC, Dave no longer accepts thinning jobs for A-types because they are so time consuming.
 

tk59

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
4,212
Reaction score
6
I still have, use and enjoy my 240 A-type. It isn't absurdly thick at the spine (just over 2 mm) but that is thicker than you might expect when the knife is 45 mm tall. If it was 50+ mm tall at the heel, it would feel significantly thinner. The steel is wear resistant but it doesn't seem as much so as everyone makes it out to be. The edge also seems to deform more easily than I expected at the reported ~60 hrc. Sometime later, someone (Rottman, I believe.) tested it at 58 hrc and also tested the composition which proved to be fairly unremarkable, if I recall correctly. It was a pretty clean carbon steel with a fair bit of chromium in it. I learned a lot about geometry by essentially using this knife as a blank to slowly make my own custom knife. I'd grind some and test and grind and test, etc. ...a very cool experience.
 

Seb

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2011
Messages
498
Reaction score
0
I have a 210mm which I have sharpened to 99/1 at 10-degrees. It took about an hour or maybe a bit more... it is a great performer.
 

TDj

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
144
Reaction score
0
that was a fairly informative post - i seem to remember that post now that you mention it. thanks for reminding me.
 

Citizen Snips

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
452
Reaction score
0
so i found this thread while i was doing some searching and would like to revisit this.

i have recently decided that i want a 240mm gyuto to go along with my 270mm HD. i am not looking for a laser, but more of a workhorse. i want something that will take some abuse and will act as the opposite of the HD. i need something that will withstand like 20lb of winter squash and then some. my HD could do it but i want to reserve it for a bit more delicate work.

also having a spare gyuto in the bag will be advantageous and as much as i would like the HD to have a suisin inox brother, it will not be as versatile of a setup.

i feel like an a-type could be exactly what im looking for. i know they take some time to thin out and i dont mind spending the time if it is going to be what i want in the end. it took me a few hours to get my HD where i want it anyway. i feel like i sharpen my HD currently the way you would have to sharpen the a-type.

so anyway, if i could get some advice on whether to pass or pull the trigger here or any other suggestions for a knife that would fit my description, it would be appreciated.
 

JohnnyChance

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
3,418
Reaction score
15
Shoulda grabbed that Heiji that was in the BST earlier this week!

Do you want to keep it stainless/semi stainless? I prefer my DT ITK to my A-Type, both are more robust than lasers, but still cut well. With a little more work the A-type could be as good or better than the ITK, perfomance wise. The A-type is obviously cheaper and more readily available, but I find the stock handle to be completely unsatisfactory. Plan on a new one...maybe Darkhoek or mhenry can make you an ebony and marble horn handle to match the rest of your kit. I would also get it stock and put an edge on it yourself. Even if you have to buy a new stone to do the job and have never tackled something like this before, it will most likely come out better than the farmed out "pro" jobs that are offered some places.
 

tk59

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
4,212
Reaction score
6
+1 on the Heiji... I'm kicking myself for not grabbing that. What other knives to consider... I love my A-type. It had enought meat on it to modify the geometry to exactly what I wanted. +1 on the UNSHARPENED. The handle is a little odd in that it is normal height and length but narrow in width. I don't really mind it but I can see why someone would want to switch it out. The other knife I'd consider is a Yoshikane. One thing about those is I've seen two 270's (one wa and the other yo) and seen measurements for another wa and yo. It seems the thickness of the knives may vary considerably. Both the thick one I tried and the thin one are excellent cutters but one is a BEAST. I would recommend it but you should call up the seller and get dimensions so you get what you're expecting. The same thing goes with the DTITK suggestion. Depending on which batch it came from, there will be significant differences.
 

rhygin

Active Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
27
Reaction score
0
Agreed with tk,totally. For better or worse, the forums tend to be a reflection on what's new and interesting at the moment. But that doesn't mean there aren't tons of other great tools out there - it's just that they have been discussed already, so people move on to newer topics. It's a personal peeve of mine, since the knives that we're great 5 years ago may still be great now.

My experience with my own wa - Yoshikane has been great. It's definitely a beast, a workhorse, but it's a great knife. I don't know if we're allowed to reference this forum (if we're not, I apologize), but a good review is at: http://www.foodieforums.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?1989-My-new-favorite-gyuto&highlight=yoshikane

Another workhorse that doesn't get many comments now, but is absolutely worth looking at is the Watanabe gyuto. Have one of those and consider him a master craftsman.

Never tried the A-type, but one comment that I remember is that some buyers had negative comments about the original sharpening. The thought back in day was that it might be best to order one without a bevel to be able to tune it to your own preference. But someone with more experience can probably address whether that's a good idea.
 

Sarge

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2011
Messages
234
Reaction score
0
Another option could be a Yoshihiro from JKI. Not a laser but a clunker either all the feedback I have heard has been very positive. I'm planning on purchasing one as soon as I donate enough plasma to cover it and my current gyuto wears out.

I'm also still considering an A-type myself I prefer knives with flatter profiles and it certainly has one.
 

tk59

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
4,212
Reaction score
6
One more thing about the A-type: I wish it were more pointed. And +1 to the Yoshihiro. The one I bought from Ben is holding up very nicely.
 

ecchef

Staff member
Founding Member
Global Moderators
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
5,889
Reaction score
178
Location
MCAS Miramar
So far, discussion has centered on gyutos. How about the single bevels?
 

obtuse

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
942
Reaction score
1
I have a 270mm a-type. I might finally use it the day I get a belt grinder.
 

tk59

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
4,212
Reaction score
6
So far, discussion has centered on gyutos. How about the single bevels?
I don't think of single bevel knives as all around workhorses. What are you suggesting?
 

heirkb

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2011
Messages
899
Reaction score
1
I think he meant the A-type single bevels. As in, what do people think of those?
 

Chef Niloc

Banned
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
1,030
Reaction score
0
I got one, it took me hours and hours to get it right but once I did the thing stayed sharp longer then any other knife, and it's sharpness can be maintained if you stay on top of it (diamond spray on glass or felt) It's almost completely stainless if not completely ( ive never noticed it stain). The biggest problem I had with the A- type is that it was a bit small for me. I used it for a year or so then got a Heiji and stopped using it. The Heiji is far from stainless. it staines easily a mater a fact, it just won't rust in front of your eyes. This is a problem with Heiji's single bevel SS knives as most of the stain resistant steel is removed from the back side.
I put a A-type up for sale a few weeks ago just because I don't use it, it's still there if you want it.





As you can see I did all the hard work
 

tk59

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
4,212
Reaction score
6
...The Heiji is far from stainless. it staines easily a mater a fact, it just won't rust in front of your eyes. This is a problem with Heiji's single bevel SS knives as most of the stain resistant steel is removed from the back side...
I hadn't thought about how useful the semi-stainless would be for single bevel knives. I guess it would be more useful to just go with stainless for those if you are afraid of rust?
 

ecchef

Staff member
Founding Member
Global Moderators
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
5,889
Reaction score
178
Location
MCAS Miramar
Thanks, Colin. Too many yanagiba already.
I'm thinking about an Usuba, and this climate is murder on straight carbon.
 

Dave Martell

Forum Founder
Professional Craftsman
Joined
Feb 27, 2011
Messages
14,068
Reaction score
965
Location
Airville, PA
Aritsugu single bevels come without an edge at all. They can be a tremendous amount of work to set up initially.
 

Dave Martell

Forum Founder
Professional Craftsman
Joined
Feb 27, 2011
Messages
14,068
Reaction score
965
Location
Airville, PA
BTW, I'm happy to see the A-type gyuto craze die away. That knife caused almost as many problems for people as Moritakas do.
 

welshstar

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2011
Messages
552
Reaction score
2
Dave

Whats your thoughts on the Heiji's that seem to be very popular right now

Alan
 

Citizen Snips

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
452
Reaction score
0
thanks for all the info. i still am considering the a-type along with a few others

a few more points for this purchase include my lack of desire to buy a clad knife again (nothing against mizuno or hiromoto but i just dont care for clad anymore) and the cost. i dont want to break the bank here. i want something like a backup gyuto that will be able to take a beating.
 

Latest posts

Top