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Michi

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erickso1

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@lowercasebill, you inspired me, thank you! Last time I ate this was nearly two years ago in Munich. (It's not available as a ready-made product in Australia.) Takes all of five minutes to throw together and is delicious.

If anyone wants to try this, here is a good recipe.
View attachment 86812
@lowercasebill , @Michi What would be the american version of ingredients in this? I checked out the recipe linked above and I don't think we have those brands locally. We have some "german" bolognas (see below), but what is the american counterpart to Thomy, the bread, and the pickles? In my youth I had my fair share of white bread, bologna, mayo (bestfood/hellmans) and american cheese.
 

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lowercasebill

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I saw you tube and then used what i had. Cubed smoked pork butt home made lacto pickles home made bread. Not authentic like Michi but good. Pickles pork and mayo, who knew? It is addictive!. At the height of the food shortages i got a gallon of blue plate heavy duty mayo for less $ than a qt of hellmans on amazon. I like it.
Also, for Michi and I it is culturally appropriate.😁
 

Michi

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Hmmm... Polish dill gherkins are quite close to German "Gewürtzgurke". Another decent option would be Cornichon pickles. Basically, these are pickles with little sugar; their flavour is driven by the vinegar and spices (dill and/or mustard seed), not by sweetness. (Don't even think about trying to substitute bread and butter pickles or some such; the Fleischsalat will come out utterly wrong that way.)

For the mayonnaise, I just did a side-by-side tasting of S&W (similar to Hellman's, but a little more eggy and a little heavier), Japanese Kewpie, and the Thomy mayonnaise. (Sorry, I don't have any Hellman's in the pantry at the moment for the comparison.)
  • The S&W is driven by a really rich eggy taste, and is very creamy (and a little bit heavy).
  • The Thomy is more vinegary and salty, and a lot lighter. Think of the difference between butter (S&W) and vegetable oil (Thomy). The Thomy also has a just noticeable undertone of mustard in it. I checked the ingredients list and it indeed contains mustard.
  • The Kewpie is halfway in between the other two as far as the texture and fat are concerned. Not quite as light as the Thomy, but not as heavy and rich as the S&W. And it is more sharply acidic, with distinct citric acid notes as opposed to the vinegary notes of the Thomy.
As an experiment, I did a 50/50 mix of S&W and Kewpie, which comes close to the Thomy in texture. Still a bit too heavy, but close, and the acidity is about right. I added a very small pinch of powdered Keen's mustard; what I ended up with was remarkably similar to the Thomy.

I suspect that an even better replica could be made by using Hellman's instead of S&W to combine with the Kewpie. The Hellman's is just a little bit lighter and closer to the Thomy in texture.

If you try to make a replica, go easy on the powdered mustard. The mustard is barely noticeable in the Thomy; I have to really search for the taste to pick it up. If the mix starts tasting mustardy, you have too much mustard. The aroma and flavour should be there as just a hint, barely discernible.
 
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Michi

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@lowercasebill , @MichiWe have some "german" bolognas (see below)
The Groetzinger looks like it has the right texture. Otherwise, mortadella will make a good substitute for Fleischwurst. But really, there are no hard and fast rules. What you are looking for is a fine-textured sausage stuffing (not smoked). Leberkäse will work just fine, as would a finely sliced (good quality) Frankfurter without the casing. Avoid any sausages that contain cereal as binder. You really want something that is a 100% meat sausage.

And, even if not entirely authentic, I have no doubt that you could make a fantastic Fleischsalat by using a decent quality (non-smoked) ham or Bierschinken, if you can find it. (Bierschinken is a large-diameter sausage made for slicing—similar to mortadella—that contains a mix of chunks of ham and very finely-ground sausage paste, much like what goes into Leberkäse or Frankfurter.)

Avoid anything that has dense noticeable lumps of fat mixed in. Polish (Kielbasa), Chorizo, Kransky, Cabanossi, salami, or any other kind of fermented coarse sausage are exactly what you do not want to use.
 
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Lars

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I spent 30 minutes pounding out this thai curry paste
IMG_0828.jpg

So I could make Gai Pad Prik Gaeng with steamed rice, fried egg and Prik Nam Pla
IMG_0849.jpg

Really tasty and a lot spicier than what I usually eat. I was sweating and blowing my nose by the end and it took like 15 minutes to come down afterwards. Great meal.
 

riba

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Where from? I was delighted a few weeks ago to find San Daniele ham at Costco in CA.
San Daniele ham floats my boat, great stuff!

I found a Spanish producer who ships Iberian ham to The Netherlands. Really happy to have found them. This is a piece of the front leg (acorn fed).

Globalization has its advantages too....
 
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