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Made smoked and dried "Nußschinken". It comes from the upper front part of the hind leg, number 16 in this diagram:
View attachment 199072
Meat prepared for curing for two weeks in vacuum:
View attachment 199073
After curing:
View attachment 199074
Trussed and hung up to dry and equilibrate for a few days:
View attachment 199075
Then four cold smoking sessions spread over four days, eight hours of smoke each time. After that, dry the ham some more (about a week), re-seal in vacuum and ripen in the fridge for a month. Finally, hung up for a few days more to dry:
View attachment 199076
And the finished product. It's tasty. Very tasty :)
View attachment 199077
Wow! Nice work! Cold smoking is no walk in the park. That looks beautiful. What type wood and smoker did you you use for smoking? Pellets?
 

Michi

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Wow! Nice work! Cold smoking is no walk in the park. That looks beautiful. What type wood and smoker did you you use for smoking? Pellets?
Thank you!

I have a Bradley digital smoker (4 racks). But, for cold smoking, I'm just using it as an enclosure. I have one of those stainless steel wire mesh snakes for cold smoking. I use the snake with sawdust or pellets, depending on what I have around. This time, I used maple to smoke the ham. But oak or beech would be suitable, too.
 

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Kålpølser. Danish smoked pork(and sometimes beef too) sausages and a broccoli and green bean sauté with cashews and almonds, plus a cheeky dollop of Colman's mustard.
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MarcelNL

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What’s the trick to getting the guanciale to soften and crisp without shrinking too much from the render? Is it to start with big chunks that become small chunks?
Using plenty is my trick ;-)
Last time I got my hands on good guanciale I made strips rather than chunks, seemed to work well.
I guess that if you want them real crispy you cannot avoid rendering much of the fat, I used a hot carbon steel pan for the exercise and ended up with tender strips with crispy outside.
 
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What’s the trick to getting the guanciale to soften and crisp without shrinking too much from the render? Is it to start with big chunks that become small chunks?
If you have a convection oven (even a regular or toaster over will probably work) then you can keep it on the thicker side and bake it at high temp, 200+C, and I think you'll get close to what you're looking for. Just keep an eye on it because it goes fast from "perfect" to overdone relatively quickly. I tend to pull it a little earlier than I think I need to.
 

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What’s the trick to getting the guanciale to soften and crisp without shrinking too much from the render? Is it to start with big chunks that become small chunks?
It'll shrink somewhat during rendering. The trick is to render the fat at a fairly low temperature. Medium-low is what you are aiming for. Let it sit in the pan so that it just bubbles lazily. That way, you get most of the fat rendered without drying out the lean parts. Cutting the lardons a little larger than you normally would avoids ending up with small and hard chunks of guanciale.

Don't fry it until it gets crispy. For carbonara, you want the fat rendered, but the meat still soft and not dry, without any crispness.
 

Edge

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Breakfast.

3KsYDsel.jpg

What is all of that? I think I see peanut butter on the left bread, and some type of meat and cheese on the right side.
But can you tell me what all is on it, including condiments?
 

HumbleHomeCook

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What is all of that? I think I see peanut butter on the left bread, and some type of meat and cheese on the right side.
But can you tell me what all is on it, including condiments?

Peanut butter? Now that would've been interesting indeed but alas that's stone ground mustard and mayo.

Scrambled eggs, sliced ham, and melted Swiss cheese on a bun. :)
 
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sGxlY1Rl.jpg


Chilled noodles with shrimp and sesame dressing. Scallion pancakes. Spicy beef stir fry.

The noodles were good but the dressing was a touch off. Not sure what it was, just a hint of bitterness but still good. Overall a nice meal and the wife loves the pancakes and attacked the beef. :)
Well….that beef looks absolutely delicious and attackable. Not sure how you made your sesame dressing. There are tons of variations. But I find that sesame, especially tahini has some bitterness to it.Doesn’t look like you used tahini though. But I think that’s why all variations have some sort of sweetener added. Really nice meal tho.
 

ch_br

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Murghi aur masoor dal (Bombay-style chicken with red split lentils), Peelay chaaval (aromatic yellow rice), Gujerati sem (Gujerati-style green beans), Baigan ka raita (yogurt with eggplant):

That looks great, do you happen to have a recipe to share for this?

Indian food is one of my top 5 favorite cuisines.. And its great for lots of steel useage!
 
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